18 Dec

SA’s mortality rate continues decline

first_img2 December 2011 Source: BuaNews The annual report, produced jointly by the departments of health and home affairs, found that the decline in the country’s number of deaths was for both men and women, with female deaths declining at a higher rate than men. TB remains most common cause Accidental injury Releasing the findings of the Mortality and Causes of Death in South Africa report for 2009, Stats SA said a total of 572 673 deaths occurred in 2009, and were registered with the Department of Home Affairs. “The highest percentage of deaths due to non-natural causes was observed for those aged 15 – 19 when compared to other age groups; and the number of deaths was generally higher for males of all age groups compared to females. In 2009, tuberculosis continued to be the most commonly mentioned cause of death on death notification forms, as well as the leading underlying natural cause of death in the country. However, the number of deaths due to this cause has been decreasing since 2007. “Also, compared to other provinces, the province of death occurrence that had the highest proportion of non-natural deaths was the Western Cape,” the report stated. “Information on causes of death indicated that the majority of deaths resulted from natural causes, particularly certain infectious and parasitic diseases,” noted the report.center_img Influenza and pneumonia were the second leading cause of death, followed by intestinal infectious diseases, other forms of heart disease and cerebro-vascular diseases. This was observed in men and women. “The total number of deaths processed by Stats SA decreased by 1.5% between 2007 and 2008, and by 3.8% between 2008 and 2009,” the agency said. HIV overall was the seventh leading cause of death, accounting for 3.1% of all deaths in 2009. For men and women, HIV was the sixth and eighth leading cause of death respectively. “The majority of deaths occurred among the black African population group. Most deaths occurred at healthcare facilities, although about 30% still occurred at home. South Africa’s mortality rate continued to decline in 2009, with tuberculosis (TB) being the most commonly mentioned cause of death on certificates, says Statistics South Africa (Stats SA). Children under 15 years died mainly from intestinal infectious diseases, while those aged between 15 and 64 years died mostly from tuberculosis. Those aged 65 years and older died mostly from cerebro-vascular diseases. “The results indicate that mortality continues to decline in the country as observed from 2007 in both data processed by Stats SA and the number of deaths recorded in the national population register.” A proportion of 8.6% of all deaths were due to non-natural causes of death, with the majority of these due to other external causes of accidental injury.last_img read more

16 Dec

U.S. Green Building Council Names Award Recipients

first_imgOther award winnersOther projects recognized in the 2017 LEED Homes Awards were these:Project of the Year: The House at Cornell Tech, Roosevelt Island, New York, is a 26-story Passive House apartment building.Outstanding Single-Family Developer: Maracay Homes in Scottsdale, Arizona. The company has built more than 9,000 homes in Phoenix and Tucson.Outstanding Multi-Family Developer: The Hudson Companies Inc., which has completed more than 3,500 housing units in the New York metro area, including The House at Cornell Tech.Outstanding Affordable Project: Crescent Crossings Phase 1, Bridgeport, Connecticut, is a four-part project that is helping to transform a high-crime section of the city.Outstanding Affordable Developer Builder: Native American Connection, Phoenix, Arizona. The project offers high-quality, safe, and affordable apartments to both individuals and families. The U.S. Green Building Council has named a high-performance house in a Decatur, Georgia, historic district as its 2017 Outstanding Single-Family Project.The house will be familiar to Green Building Advisor readers. Carl Seville, who built and owns the 2,646-square-foot, two-story home, is a longtime GBA author who detailed the ups and downs of this home’s construction in a series of posts beginning in 2016.Seville is a principal at SK Collaborative, a consulting company that offers a variety of services revolving around green building. The house was designed by Thomas Bateman Hood Architecture in Carmel, California.Seville, a former remodeler, and his partner Abe Kruger offer consulting services to builders, architects, and remodelers. One service is certifying green buildings under a number of programs, including the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The Historic Infill Home, as it’s called, is a LEED Platinum home that has won a number of other certifications and awards.“The Historic District Infill Home manages to fit seamlessly into a prestigious existing historic district while meeting the highest standards of energy efficiency and sustainability through its LEED Platinum certification,” the USGBC announcement said. “The 100 percent electric home employs state-of-the-art concepts in design, construction, and mechanical systems.”As Seville described in a 2016 post, the house came after two earlier attempts at construction on the site fizzled. Seville bought a 750-square-foot cottage on the property in 2005. His first attempts to win local approval for a new house on the property failed. Then, in 2013, after failing to get a mortgage from a local bank for a new house, Seville decided to remodel the 1925 cottage. The renovated cottage, protected by historic preservation rules, eventually became an accessory building on the lot when the new house was constructed. Work on the new house started in 2016.Seville started writing his blog series for GBA, the “Green Building Curmudgeon,” in 2008.“I’ve come to think of this project as a ‘stealth’ green home,” Seville wrote a year after moving in, “primarily because it doesn’t have the touchstone ‘green’ features people think about: solar panels, ground-source heat pumps, a heat-pump water heater or tankless water heaters, and maybe that key one, spray foam insulation.“It’s also a very traditional design which doesn’t seem to get as much attention as contemporary architecture these days,” he continued. “But I don’t care what people think about it. We are enjoying the house, the porch, and even the carport and driveway which, it ends up, is an awesome party space.”last_img read more

15 Dec

Why We’re Not In A Cyberwar With China

first_imgantone gonsalves Tags:#business#China#CISPA#corporate networks#cyberespionage#cyberwar#Government#hackers#Obama administration#spying#u.s. Related Posts IT + Project Management: A Love Affair 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Nowcenter_img Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Recent reports of Chinese cyberspying have revealed hacking operations with a shocking scale and level of sophistication. China’s hackers appear to be stealing massive amounts of intellectual property and proprietary information from U.S. companies, including those connected to the nation’s critical infrastructure, such as waterworks, the electrical power grid and oil and gas pipelines. A recent study  by security company Mandiant has shown that, in all probability, some of the snooping has been done by an arm of the Chinese military.The revelations of China’s misbehavior have led some writers to rashly declare that the U.S. is at war with our Asian rival, at least in cyberspace. This could not be further from the truth, and here’s why.There’s No WarFirst, something obviously needs to be done to punish China for its thievery. But to describe the current state as war or cyberwar draws emotions at the expense of rational thinking. We are not at war with China, either in or out of cyberspace.Real cyberwar would start with an attack that destroys something valuable or vital, kills people, or both. If the recipient labels the strike an act of war then time for negotiations is over. “Reacting diplomatically and legally to an act of cyberwar is inadequate,” says Stewart Baker, a partner at Steptoe & Johnson and a former assistant secretary for policy at the Department of Homeland Security. “It’s an act of war, we need to treat it as such and respond with our own acts of war.”An example of a true cyberattack was the Stuxnet malware that destroyed centrifuges in Iran’s nuclear facilities. Discovered in 2010, Stuxnet was designed by the U.S. and Israel, according to media reports.We are not under attack by China. The country is not our enemy. It is our economic and political rival. There is no evidence China wants to destroy anything. What it wants is information that provides a trade advantage, and at the moment there’s no better way to get data from U.S. competitors than to let your spies loose on the Internet.Most experts assume the U.S. also hacks China’s computers to gather intelligence. The Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank, has identified two growth areas in the U.S. defense industry, drone manufacturing and the development of malware capable of exploiting software vulnerabilities not yet known to the developer.Governments have always spied on each other, so it’s no surprise that China, the U.S. and many other countries are using the Internet to steal information. Where China goes too far is in hacking U.S. companies. By law, the U.S. government cannot break into the computers of private companies for the sole purpose of taking intellectual property. China has no such restrictions.What We Can DoSo the U.S. is within its rights to use every diplomatic, political, legal and economic tool at its disposal to pressure China to stop hacking private companies – or to at least negotiate an informal agreement that sets limits. While it’s true China holds $1.2 trillion in U.S. debt, the U.S. is also the biggest buyer of Chinese goods. The U.S. is not without leverage here.The Obama administration has already put China on notice. On Wednesday, the White House released its strategy for preventing the theft of U.S. trade secrets. The plan includes ratcheting up diplomatic efforts and making prosecution of foreign companies a top priority.Such pressure could eventually lead to informal agreements that start small and grow in scope as trust builds. A starting point for the U.S. and China could be a ban on the destruction or disruption of critical infrastructure or technology driving the global economic system.In the past, nations have reached understandings governing maritime transportation, air transport, the behavior of navies and international trade well in advance of formal treaties on these subjects, according to a recent paper by Richard Clarke, a former White House adviser on cybersecurity and cyberterrorism, entitled “Securing Cyberspace Through International Norms.” For example, the U.S. and Russia are in discussions to establish a cyber hotline in order to prevent cyberspace activity from escalating into a conflict.In the meantime, the U.S. should move much faster to adopt regulations for securing critical infrastructure and corporate networks. A good start would be passage of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which would establish rules for sharing cyberthreat information between private industry and government agencies. Such information is important in strengthening defenses.Eventually, China and the U.S. will draw lines in cyberspace that neither will cross. To get there, we should avoid nonsensical discussions of war that paint China as the enemy, and look for areas of agreement from which we can move forward.Photo by Shutterstock Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

28 Nov

London Olympics: Beijing silver medallist Lucie Decosse wins gold in wmen’s 70kg judo

first_imgFrance’s Lucie Decosse took the women’s 70kg judo gold at the Olympics on Wednesday, beating Germany’s Kerstin Thiele by waza-ari in the final. Decosse won silver in the 63 kg class in Beijing four years ago and has since taken two World titles in the 70 kg class, and was the clear favourite against Thiele, whose greatest achievement to date was a European silver medal in 2009.Colombia’s Yuri Alvear and Dutch judoka Edith Bosch won the bronze medals after both coming through the repechage.Alvear took bronze by waza-ari against China’s Fei Chen, while Bosch won her medal on a referee’s decision after finishing level with South Korea’s Ye-Sul Hwang on one yuko each.For Bosch, it was her second Olympic bronze in two Games after she received the same prize in Beijing four years ago.last_img read more