19 Oct

Russia rolls out first approved COVID-19 drug as infections pass 500,000

first_imgRussia on Thursday rolled out a drug approved to treat patients suffering from the novel coronavirus, its state financial backer said, as the number of infections there surpassed half a million.The first deliveries of the new antiviral drug, registered under the name Avifavir, were made to some hospitals and clinics across the country, Russia’s RDIF sovereign wealth fund said in a press release. RDIF has a 50% share in a joint venture with the drug’s manufacturer ChemRar that runs the trials.The health ministry gave its approval for the drug’s use under a special accelerated process while clinical trials, held over a shorter period and with fewer people than many other countries, were still underway. Topics : With 502,436 cases, Russia has the third highest number of infections in the world after Brazil and the United States, but has a relatively low official death toll of 6,532 – something that has been the focus of debate.The Moscow health department on Wednesday raised its death toll for the month of May, citing changes in the way it determines the cause of death for patients suffering from other health problems.Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov on Thursday denied there was anything untoward with Russia’s official coronavirus death data after the World Health Organization said this week that Russia’s low death rate was “difficult to understand”. center_img There is currently no vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, and human trials of several existing antiviral drugs have yet to show efficacy.RDIF chief Kirill Dmitriev last week told Reuters the plan was for ChemRar to manufacture enough of the drug to treat around 60,000 people a month.Dmitriev on Thursday said more than 10 countries had made requests for Avifavir supplies.Negotiations were underway to supply the drug to almost all of Russia’s regions, with seven of its more than 80 regions receiving Thursday’s initial deliveries, Dmitriev added.last_img read more

27 Sep

Loving dad’s year of torment

first_imgNelson Mail 3 Nov 2012Fathers beware. Giving your child a kiss and cuddle in public could land you in court.http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/news/7903081/Loving-dads-year-of-tormentWhile pleased to walk free from the court, the father is disturbed at what happened. Particularly concerning was the police refusal to take statements from independent witnesses in his support. A Wellington family, which had never met the family until camping at the reserve, only became aware of the charges in August last year. The mother then wrote to Motueka police saying she saw the events at close range and could give an impartial account. Another couple at the domain who knew the family said it was inconceivable that anything inappropriate could have happened. It was daylight, with a large number of people around the playground, and camp sites next to it. If anything inappropriate had happened they would have intervened, the man said. Another woman, a nurse, who was there also said the accusations were nonsense. Yet the police did not interview these witnesses.WHAT HAPPENEDJanuary 3 and 4 2011: Family visit McKee Domain, Ruby Bay, along with 300 others. Other visitors allege inappropriate behaviour between father and daughter, report to caretaker who calls police. Constable arrives and father denies any wrongdoing.March 24: Police arrive at family home with search warrant for shirt and dress. Father taken to Motueka police station, arrested for indecent assault on 10-year-old daughter.March 25: Father appears in court, bailed with conditions not to contact family.June 21: Father’s lawyer Brett Daniell-Smith applies for an oral evidence order to hear evidence of witnesses.July: Lawyer asks police to review decision to charge father. Detective Sergeant Craig Johnston responds that police have six credible accounts of indecent behaviour and he believes the father has been correctly charged.August 29: Judge Ellis grants an oral evidential order for three defence witnesses, bail conditions relaxed but father not allowed home.September 29: After eight months father gets 1 hours of supervised contact with two younger daughters.November 25: Oral evidence called at committal hearing at Nelson District Court. JPs rule there is no case to answer and discharge father.March 7 2012: Police apply to the High Court at Nelson to re-lay charges, arguing the JPs have exceeded their function.April 16: Application heard, Justice Miller agrees that the JPs were wrong and trial date set for October.July 11: Judge Bruce Davidson declines application from father’s lawyer for a discharge, saying it is up to a jury to decide.October: Jury trial, Crown re-lays charge with eight counts of indecent assault. After the father has given evidence, the father’s lawyer applies for him to be discharged saying there is insufficient evidence, and the identity of the complainant in each charge is uncertain. The trial is halted and none of the defence witnesses called. Judge Behrens discharges the father.last_img read more