2 Jun

Kaneka Eurogentec Receives GMP Accreditation for New mRNA Manufacturing Facility – COVID-19 Vaccine Production…

first_img Facebook Twitter Twitter TAGS  By Digital AIM Web Support – February 17, 2021 Facebook Kaneka Eurogentec Receives GMP Accreditation for New mRNA Manufacturing Facility – COVID-19 Vaccine Production Ongoing Local NewsBusinesscenter_img WhatsApp SERAING, Belgium–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 17, 2021– Kaneka Eurogentec: This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210217005028/en/ Photo credit: Kaneka Eurogentec S.A. A new GMP facility for active pharmaceutical ingredient production The new facility audited and accredited by Belgian Authorities will allow the production and the purification of up to 10 g scale ( up to 1 Million doses of vaccine) of RNA for use in human clinical trials and commercial supply, with potential for expansion. Strengthening Eurogentec’s position as a leader in gene therapy Dr. Lieven Janssens, Kaneka Eurogentec’s President and CEO, said, “Manufacturing GMP mRNA complements perfectly our ongoing GMP DNA manufacturing activities providing a one-stop-shop offering Plasmid DNA, linearization and mRNA production. It’s definitely the ambition of Kaneka Eurogentec to become the world leading CDMO for mRNA, as we are already for the production of plasmid DNA. ”. Two mRNA contracts already signed The expertise of the company for more than 25 years as CDMO for the manufacturing of GMP Biopharmaceuticals is recognized worldwide. Two customers have already signed for three mRNA sequences including for early phase COVID-19 clinical trials. About Kaneka Eurogentec Eurogentec was founded in 1985 as one of the first biotech companies in Belgium. Kaneka Eurogentec contributes to improving health and fighting diseases by supplying products and services to scientists involved in life science research, molecular diagnostics, and therapeutic developments. The Liège-based company is recognised as one of the major suppliers in the field of genomics and proteomics as well as a trusted Contract Development and Manufacturing Organisation (CDMO) for the bio-production of pharmaceuticals (vaccines and medicines In 2010, Eurogentec, renamed Kaneka Eurogentec in April 2017, became part of Kaneka Corporation, a large Japanese chemical company focusing on technology and innovation. About Kaneka Corporation Kaneka is an innovation-oriented chemical company. Traditionally the company has been active in polymers, fermentation, biotechnology and electronics, as well as other fields. Business activities now span a broad spectrum of markets ranging from plastics, EPS resins, chemicals and foodstuffs to pharmaceuticals, medical devices, electrical and electronic materials and synthetic fibers. The life science related activities are currently one of the strategically important domains for Kaneka. The company has been a pioneer among Japanese chemical companies in establishing overseas operations, beginning in 1970 with a subsidiary in Belgium. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210217005028/en/ CONTACT: Kaneka Eurogentec S.A. Frédéric Dimola – Marketing Manager;[email protected]; 0032 4 372 74 00 www.eurogentec.com KEYWORD: BELGIUM EUROPE INDUSTRY KEYWORD: MEDICAL SUPPLIES HEALTH INFECTIOUS DISEASES RESEARCH SCIENCE PHARMACEUTICAL BIOTECHNOLOGY SOURCE: Kaneka Eurogentec Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/17/2021 04:00 AM/DISC: 02/17/2021 04:00 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210217005028/en WhatsApp Pinterest Pinterest Previous articleCockburn, Dosunmu lead No. 5 Illini past Northwestern 73-66Next articlePandemic politicking: Israel’s election sprint echoes US’s Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

26 May

Even A Trespasser In Established Possession Can Obtain Injunction: Supreme Court

first_imgTop StoriesEven A Trespasser In Established Possession Can Obtain Injunction: Supreme Court LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK8 Feb 2021 8:34 PMShare This – xEven a trespasser, who is in established possession of the property could obtain injunction, the Supreme Court observed while upholding a Madras High Court judgment decreeing an injunction suit.The bench comprising Justices Ashok Bhushan, R. Subhash Reddy and MR Shah observed that the principle that plaintiff cannot seek for a bare permanent injunction without seeking a prayer…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginEven a trespasser, who is in established possession of the property could obtain injunction, the Supreme Court observed while upholding a Madras High Court judgment decreeing an injunction suit.The bench comprising Justices Ashok Bhushan, R. Subhash Reddy and MR Shah observed that  the principle that plaintiff cannot seek for a bare permanent injunction without seeking a prayer for declaration will not apply when the plaintiff’s possession over the property is ‘admitted and established’.In this case, the plaintiff filed a suit seeking injunction simplicitor. He sought a permanent injunction interdicting the defendants from disturbing the peaceful possession and enjoyment of the plaintiff over the suit property. The judgment of the Trial Court decreeing the suit was upheld by the High Court in Second Appeal. The main contention raised by the defendant before the Apex court was that the plaintiff could not have sought for a bare permanent injunction without seeking a prayer for declaration. The suit of the plaintiff could not have been decreed mere on the fact that the defendants failed to prove their title and possession, it was contended.Examining the pleadings, the bench observed that the defendant of the suit, Subramanian had earlier filed a suit for recovery of possession and declaration for the same property and the same was dismissed and that in his cross-examination himself admitted that the plaintiff after purchase had demolished the construction. Taking note of this, the bench observed:The High Court was also right in its view that it is a common principle of law that even trespasser, who is in established possession of the property could obtain injunction. However, the matter would be different, if the plaintiff himself elaborates in the plaint about title dispute and fails to make a prayer for declaration of title along with injunction relief. The High Court has rightly observed that a bare perusal of the plaint would demonstrate that the plaintiff has not narrated anything about the title dispute obviously because of the fact that in the previous litigation, DW1 failed to obtain any relief. The High court has rightly observed that the principle that plaintiff cannot seek for a bare permanent injunction without seeking a prayer for declaration is not applicable to the facts of the present case.We do not find any error in the view of the High Court and the suit for injunction filed by the plaintiff deserved to be decreed on the basis of admitted and established possession of the plaintiff, the court observed while dismissing the appeal.CASE: A.SUBRAMANIAN vs. R. PANNERSELVAM [CIVIL APPEAL NO.9472 of 2010CORAM: Justices Ashok Bhushan, R. Subhash Reddy and MR ShahCOUNSEL: Adv K. Abhirame, Adv V. PrabhakarCITTION: LL 2021 SC 71Click here to Read/Download JudgmentSubscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

20 Sep

Pochettino sympathises with Carver

first_img Handed the reins until the end of the season following Alan Pardew’s departure, the Geordie has not had the easiest of rides – something Pochettino sympathises with, to an extent at least. “In your career, sometimes maybe you are up and sometimes you are down,” the Spurs boss said. “We know the stress. “You suffer a lot when things are not good, so for that reason I care a lot about my colleague. “I think we understand that when you put your face in front on the touchline and you are a head coach or a manager, you are responsible. “If you want to keep your place, you need to stay behind (the scenes). The manager, the head coach, needs to be brave because it is not an easy job. “When the good things happen, sometimes it is good to hear ‘good job’, ‘good manager’, ‘good man’. “When the problems arrive, it is difficult to be in a good mood like me today. But it is important to be brave and to be calm and to be clever because you need to understand this is football.” Hugo Lloris and Kyle Walker are among several Spurs doubts for the trip to St James’ Park, where Pochettino’s men will look to get back to winning ways after a disappointing few weeks. A number of fans will boycott the Magpies’ match against Spurs on Sunday in a show of defiance against owner Mike Ashley as another disappointing season comes to a close. The protest may well hinder United’s chances of a first Premier League win since February, which will no doubt ratchet up the pressure on Carver. Press Association Tottenham head coach Mauricio Pochettino sympathises with under-pressure John Carver, even though his Newcastle counterpart knew exactly what he was letting himself in for. A goalless draw at Burnley was followed by defeat at White Hart Lane to Tim Sherwood’s Aston Villa, but the Spurs boss insists his players’ are not already thinking of their summer holidays. “When you lose it is an easy explanation,” Pochettino said. “In football we use a lot of those but it’s not true. “When you lose we need to be serious and analyse why. But it is difficult to explain sometimes why. “It is true that different things happen during the season, we are up or down. But it is true that the last two games were not good. We need to improve.” last_img read more

20 Sep

Must Read: NY Times Columnist Bari Weiss’ Resignation Letter

first_imgBari WeissDear A.G.,It is with sadness that I write to tell you that I am resigning from The New York Times. I joined the paper with gratitude and optimism three years ago. I was hired with the goal of bringing in voices that would not otherwise appear in your pages: first-time writers, centrists, conservatives and others who would not naturally think of The Times as their home. The reason for this effort was clear: The paper’s failure to anticipate the outcome of the 2016 election meant that it didn’t have a firm grasp of the country it covers. Dean Baquet and others have admitted as much on various occasions. The priority in Opinion was to help redress that critical shortcoming.I was honored to be part of that effort, led by James Bennet. I am proud of my work as a writer and as an editor. Among those I helped bring to our pages: the Venezuelan dissident Wuilly Arteaga; the Iranian chess champion Dorsa Derakhshani; and the Hong Kong Christian democrat Derek Lam. Also: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Masih Alinejad, Zaina Arafat, Elna Baker, Rachael Denhollander, Matti Friedman, Nick Gillespie, Heather Heying, Randall Kennedy, Julius Krein, Monica Lewinsky, Glenn Loury, Jesse Singal, Ali Soufan, Chloe Valdary, Thomas Chatterton Williams, Wesley Yang, and many others.But the lessons that ought to have followed the election—lessons about the importance of understanding other Americans, the necessity of resisting tribalism, and the centrality of the free exchange of ideas to a democratic society—have not been learned. Instead, a new consensus has emerged in the press, but perhaps especially at this paper: that truth isn’t a process of collective discovery, but an orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else.Twitter is not on the masthead of The New York Times. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor. As the ethics and mores of that platform have become those of the paper, the paper itself has increasingly become a kind of performance space. Stories are chosen and told in a way to satisfy the narrowest of audiences, rather than to allow a curious public to read about the world and then draw their own conclusions. I was always taught that journalists were charged with writing the first rough draft of history. Now, history itself is one more ephemeral thing molded to fit the needs of a predetermined narrative.My own forays into Wrongthink have made me the subject of constant bullying by colleagues who disagree with my views. They have called me a Nazi and a racist; I have learned to brush off comments about how I’m “writing about the Jews again.” Several colleagues perceived to be friendly with me were badgered by coworkers. My work and my character are openly demeaned on company-wide Slack channels where masthead editors regularly weigh in. There, some coworkers insist I need to be rooted out if this company is to be a truly “inclusive” one, while others post ax emojis next to my name. Still other New York Times employees publicly smear me as a liar and a bigot on Twitter with no fear that harassing me will be met with appropriate action. They never are.There are terms for all of this: unlawful discrimination, hostile work environment, and constructive discharge. I’m no legal expert. But I know that this is wrong. I do not understand how you have allowed this kind of behavior to go on inside your company in full view of the paper’s entire staff and the public. And I certainly can’t square how you and other Times leaders have stood by while simultaneously praising me in private for my courage. Showing up for work as a centrist at an American newspaper should not require bravery.Part of me wishes I could say that my experience was unique. But the truth is that intellectual curiosity—let alone risk-taking—is now a liability at The Times. Why edit something challenging to our readers, or write something bold only to go through the numbing process of making it ideologically kosher, when we can assure ourselves of job security (and clicks) by publishing our 4000th op-ed arguing that Donald Trump is a unique danger to the country and the world? And so self-censorship has become the norm.What rules that remain at The Times are applied with extreme selectivity. If a person’s ideology is in keeping with the new orthodoxy, they and their work remain unscrutinized. Everyone else lives in fear of the digital thunderdome. Online venom is excused so long as it is directed at the proper targets. Op-eds that would have easily been published just two years ago would now get an editor or a writer in serious trouble, if not fired. If a piece is perceived as likely to inspire backlash internally or on social media, the editor or writer avoids pitching it. If she feels strongly enough to suggest it, she is quickly steered to safer ground. And if, every now and then, she succeeds in getting a piece published that does not explicitly promote progressive causes, it happens only after every line is carefully massaged, negotiated and caveated.It took the paper two days and two jobs to say that the Tom Cotton op-ed “fell short of our standards.” We attached an editor’s note on a travel story about Jaffa shortly after it was published because it “failed to touch on important aspects of Jaffa’s makeup and its history.” But there is still none appended to Cheryl Strayed’s fawning interview with the writer Alice Walker, a proud anti-Semite who believes in lizard Illuminati. The paper of record is, more and more, the record of those living in a distant galaxy, one whose concerns are profoundly removed from the lives of most people. This is a galaxy in which, to choose just a few recent examples, the Soviet space program is lauded for its “diversity”; the doxxing of teenagers in the name of justice is condoned; and the worst caste systems in human history includes the United States alongside Nazi Germany.Even now, I am confident that most people at The Times do not hold these views. Yet they are cowed by those who do. Why? Perhaps because they believe the ultimate goal is righteous. Perhaps because they believe that they will be granted protection if they nod along as the coin of our realm—language—is degraded in service to an ever-shifting laundry list of right causes. Perhaps because there are millions of unemployed people in this country and they feel lucky to have a job in a contracting industry. Or perhaps it is because they know that, nowadays, standing up for principle at the paper does not win plaudits. It puts a target on your back. Too wise to post on Slack, they write to me privately about the “new McCarthyism” that has taken root at the paper of record.All this bodes ill, especially for independent-minded young writers and editors paying close attention to what they’ll have to do to advance in their careers. Rule One: Speak your mind at your own peril. Rule Two: Never risk commissioning a story that goes against the narrative. Rule Three: Never believe an editor or publisher who urges you to go against the grain. Eventually, the publisher will cave to the mob, the editor will get fired or reassigned, and you’ll be hung out to dry.For these young writers and editors, there is one consolation. As places like The Times and other once-great journalistic institutions betray their standards and lose sight of their principles, Americans still hunger for news that is accurate, opinions that are vital, and debate that is sincere. I hear from these people every day. “An independent press is not a liberal ideal or a progressive ideal or a democratic ideal. It’s an American ideal,” you said a few years ago. I couldn’t agree more. America is a great country that deserves a great newspaper. None of this means that some of the most talented journalists in the world don’t still labor for this newspaper. They do, which is what makes the illiberal environment especially heartbreaking. I will be, as ever, a dedicated reader of their work. But I can no longer do the work that you brought me here to do—the work that Adolph Ochs described in that famous 1896 statement: “to make of the columns of The New York Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion.”Ochs’s idea is one of the best I’ve encountered. And I’ve always comforted myself with the notion that the best ideas win out. But ideas cannot win on their own. They need a voice. They need a hearing. Above all, they must be backed by people willing to live by them. Sincerely,Barilast_img read more

18 Dec

Still farming at 88 with no signs of stopping

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It seems like an everyday occurrence that something is unveiled in agriculture that is the next greatest thing. Products that will boost yields, thwart diseases and insects and plant at twice the speed of sound are certainly steps forward in producing enough food, fiber and fuel for our ever-increasing world population.Although we can never stop thinking about how agriculture needs to look in the future, I believe that some of the greatest assets of our industry have been around for awhile.Recently, I stopped by a half-harvested soybean field in Shelby County and jumped in a John Deere combine that was being piloted by 88-year old Bernard Clinehens.Clinehens is a true veteran, not only in the military sense, but also with his 8 plus decades of farming experience. I have always felt that one of the best ways to move agriculture forward is to take a look at the past. Farmers like Clinehens have seen it all and have survived. In his lifetime, Clinehens has seen a Great Depression, a Dust Bowl, a Prohibition, multiple wars, two new states and a boom in technology, both on and off of the farm, that changed the way we live today. Who wouldn’t want to learn from someone like that?Clinehens mentioned a time or two about the “auto-steer” function on his machine and how he could head down the rows without a hand on the wheel. Heck, he was just as thrilled that the combine had a cab. He swallowed a lot of dust when he first started farming, after deciding becoming a teacher wasn’t for him.As you might imagine, Clinehens has been asked many times by many younger farmers what it takes to make it in this business. His answer didn’t have a thing to do with outguessing the markets, or having all of the newfangled gear, but it had everything to do with enjoying the job.Who, after 88 years of doing anything would still be doing it with a smile, except for a farmer? Thanks for the ride, Mr. Clinehens. I learned more in 30 minutes in your cab than I have learned in a long time.Take a look at some of our conversation with this Cab Cam video featuring Bernard Clinehens.last_img read more

28 Nov

#KicksStalker: Jordan’s second shoe gets new life

first_imgThe Bred, meanwhile, will come out on Oct. 18 together with the low-top version.No word yet on the Philippine price, but SoleCollector.com reports the regular mid-top versions will cost $185 while the low-tops will be at $160.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparc Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Read Next Photo from Jordan Brand’s official FacebookMichael Jordan’s second signature shoe is set for a resurrection, and this isn’t a new colorway of the same exact design that released in 1986.The new Air Jordan XXXII took inspiration from the Air Jordan II, the shoe that started the legend of his Airness, with its Italian roots and subtle design.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. As per Nike.com, the Air Jordan XXXII will have a Flyknit upper with “high-tenacity yarn.”The sole will feature Zoom Air bags, a Flight Plate, and a herring bone construction underneath.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingReigning NBA MVP Russell Westbrook will be the poster boy of the new design as the Oklahoma City point guard featured in the promo shots wearing the “Bred” colorway.The “Bred,” however won’t be the first colorway to be released as the distinction belongs to the “Rosso Corso,” which will be available on Sept. 23. Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo MOST READcenter_img Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Biggest Pogo service provider padlocked for tax evasion Nara upsets 2004 champion Kuznetsova at US Open Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters View comments LATEST STORIES NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaullast_img read more

28 Oct

10 months agoMan Utd boss Mourinho loses rag in post-match interview

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd boss Mourinho loses rag in post-match interviewby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Jose Mourinho took aim at a reporter after their 3-1 defeat to Liverpool.In truth United were second best all over the pitch and the defeat kept them eight points behind Arsenal in fifth place. Mourinho’s side have now conceded 29 goals this season in the league, one more than they did across the whole of last season. Asked if he believed the players are playing for him, Mourinho snapped: “What is that? Are you calling the players dishonest? You are asking me if they are dishonest.”I believe they are honest and you believe they are dishonest. A footballer has to give the maximum every day, every match, every minute, it doesn’t matter the manager, it doesn’t matter anything.”The club that pays him, the fans that are 24 hours per day in love with our club. It’s about respect for the club and the fans. The players that don’t do the maximum you are calling them dishonest. I don’t call them dishonest at all.” last_img read more

28 Oct

20 days agoLeicester boss Rodgers fumes: Mane made most of it

first_imgLeicester boss Rodgers fumes: Mane made most of itby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City boss Brendan Rodgers was furious with the way Sadio Mane won Liverpool’s matchwinning penalty on Saturday.Mane was brought down in stoppage time after a mix up between Albrighton and goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel before James Milner calmly slotted from 12 yards to give the hosts a huge victory that extends their winning run in the league to 17 games, dating back to March.Rodgers felt aggrieved by Chris Kavanagh’s decision to award the penalty kick, saying: “I think he has made the most of the contact.”Strikers now, they are clever. He has had a touch and gone over. If the referee didn’t give it I don’t think anyone would have said it was a clear and obvious error. “To concede a 95 minute penalty was difficult to take. I thought we deserved a point. You come to the European champions and you have to be resilient and deal with pressure and show your own qualities. I felt we did that.”I thought we could go on and win the game. We conceded a goal when we were in control. I thought it was a very soft penalty, not clear and obvious that is for sure but when the referee gives it it is hard for the VAR to go against it. “But I am very proud of the team and the personality we showed. To come here and be that competitive, it shows we are very much on the right path.”You have to have that [doggedness]. Any of the best teams always has a balance.”You come to a stadium that is one of the most difficult in Europe, in terms of momentum. We were able to turn the momentum around for us. “You have to have all types. Today we had to have that persistence and perseverance but when we had spells with the ball, we looked creative and we had a threat. “We looked like we could maybe get in front in the game. It wasn’t to be but I am proud of coming to here and bringing a team to compete at that level.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

23 Oct

First Teekay ECC Shuttle Tanker Starts Taking Shape

first_imgSouth Korea’s Samsung Heavy Industries has laid keel for Teekay’s first shuttle tanker newbuilding intended for the East Coast Canada (ECC) project.The milestone marks the end of the block building period as well as the beginning of the next phase – completion of the newbuilding with all its systems.The shuttle tanker, the Beothuk Spirit, is expected to be delivered in August of 2017.This shuttle tanker is the first of three newbuildings to be provided for loading crude at Hibernia, Terra Nova, White Rose and Hebron offshore oil fields located in St. John’s, Newfoundland & Labrador.Construction on all three shuttle tankers has commenced with the first vessel now 65% complete and construction on the third vessel just underway.These three vessels, which have a total cost of approximately USD 375 million, are scheduled to deliver during the second half of 2017 and first half of 2018.They will replace two in-charters and one owned vessel currently servicing this 15-year, plus extension options, contract with a consortium of 9 oil companies.last_img read more