17 Sep

Tropical Storm Jose intensifies TS Katia to follow

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#HurricaneSeason, #magneticmedianews, #TropicalStormJose, #TropicalStormKatia Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppUPDATE: The National Hurricane Center has advised that Tropical Storm Jose, with maximum sustained winds of 60mph, is close to hurricane strength. At present, TS Jose continues to gain strength in the Atlantic Ocean and is likely to become the fifth hurricane of the 2017 Hurricane season by tonight.Closely following is Tropical Storm Katia, who is moving little in the southwest Gulf of Mexico but is also forecasted to become a hurricane.As many brace themselves for Hurricane Irma, and others already experiencing the devastation from it, Jose is approximately 1,200 miles East of the Lesser Antilles and is moving west-northwest at 15-20 mph.Magnetic Media will continue to update you as more information comes in from the met office.Story By: Kay-Marie Fletcher Bad weather for Bahamas & TCI ahead of Hurricane Irma Caribbean countries readying for Irma, TS Jose forms today Hurricane Ike strike on TCI was nine year ago Recommended for youlast_img read more

17 Sep

2018 MCAS Miramar Airshow takes place September 2830

first_img2018 MCAS Miramar Airshow takes place September 28-30 Posted: September 21, 2018 September 21, 2018 KUSI Newsroom Updated: 6:59 PMcenter_img KUSI Newsroom, Categories: KUSI, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsThe 2018 Miramar Air Show will take place September 28-30. Colonel Charles Dockery, Commanding Officer at MCAS Miramar, joined us to give us a preview.last_img read more

13 Sep

Congress Close to Clearing FY16 Budget Resolution

first_imgThe House adopted the fiscal 2016 conference budget resolution last Thursday, a compromise that strips out a procedural hurdle that could have blocked the Senate from allocating tens of billions of extra dollars included in DOD’s war account.To evade the $523 billion Budget Control Act cap on national security spending, the budget blueprints advanced in both the House and Senate allot $96 billion — including $58 billion requested by the Obama administration and $38 billion in extra funds — to the department’s overseas contingency operations account (OCO). That account is not subject to the budget caps.The Senate version, however, included a point of order on spending from the OCO exceeding $58 billion, a mechanism that likely would have required defense hawks to produce 60 votes to override any objections raised by Senate Democrats or fiscal conservatives. The maneuver essentially would have counteracted the chamber’s attempt to sidestep the budget caps by stashing extra funds for DOD in the OCO.House and Senate conferees removed the Senate point of order due to pressure from defense hawks, reported CQ Roll Call. The Senate is expected to take up the conference report, which will not go to the president for his signature, as early as today.While the compromise budget resolution removes any obstacles to appropriators allocating the extra defense funds, it will not become law and, as a result, does not settle the dispute between congressional Republicans and the White House over how to deal with the statutory spending caps. President Obama has vowed to veto any FY 2016 spending bills that adhere to the Budget Control Act caps or provide budgetary relief only to the Pentagon. Absent a bipartisan agreement to lift the caps for both defense and non-defense agencies, it is not clear how the government will be funded next year. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

31 Aug

Scientists Create First NonCarbon Material with NearDiamond Hardness

first_imgResearch scientists have created the first non-carbon-based material with a hardness approaching that of diamond. Their work could have a significant impact on technologies and industries that rely on diamond as a cutting and drilling tool and abrasive. Extremely hard yet metallically conductive: Researchers develop novel material with high-tech prospects Explore further Citation: Scientists Create First Non-Carbon Material with Near-Diamond Hardness (2007, March 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-03-scientists-non-carbon-material-near-diamond-hardness.htmlcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The material is a boron nitride “nanocomposite.” This means that, rather than consisting of one large continuous crystal, it is made of crystalline boron-nitride grains that are each a few to several nanometers in size. Although research groups have previously reported boron carbonitride materials, claimed to be the second and third hardest materials after diamond, the particular versions, or “phases,” of those materials were unstable at high temperatures. In industry, this is a major drawback.“The real breakthrough would be a bulk material that is hard, tough, and thermally stable, and thus ideal for cutting and drilling. We are the first to synthesize a bulk noncarbon material that fits this description,” said Natalia Dubrovinskaia, a researcher with the University of Heidelberg and the University of Bayreuth, both in Germany, to PhysOrg.com. Dubrovinskaia is the lead author of the paper describing the new material, which appears in the March 8 edition of Applied Physics Letters.For many materials composed of crystalline grains, also referred to as polycrystalline materials, there is a grain size for which the material’s hardness is optimized. This size is often in the nanometer range.Along this line of thought, Dubrovinskaia and her colleagues synthesized and conducted several experiments on a series of polycrystalline and nanocrystalline phases of boron nitride. This characterization included measuring the samples’ “Vickers hardness,” a test that assigns a hardness value to a material based on how readily it is indented by diamond. That value can be expressed in terms of the pressure applied by the diamond – using the pressure unit “pascal” – before it makes an indentation. For very hard materials that usually means billions of pascals (gigapascals, GPa). Single-crystal diamond, the hardest type, has a hardness of about 100 GPa.The boron nitride nanocomposite synthesized by Dubrovinskaia and her group displayed a maximum hardness of 85 GPa at a grain size of about 14 nanometers, and is thermally stable up to 1600 degrees Kelvin (about 2400 degrees Fahrenheit). The material’s hardness arises from two factors: the nanoscale-grain-size effect and each grain’s two-phase composition. That is, each grain has a nanoscale crystalline structure and a sub-nanoscale structure. This complex composition significantly increases the bulk material’s mechanical strength.Prior to this research, the next hardest known material after single-crystal diamond was cubic boron nitride, a single-crystal phase of the material, which has a Vickers hardness of 50 GPa. That leaves a rather large 50 GPa gap.“This gap can be filled by boron nitride nanocomposites, particularly by tuning their grain size and the compositional structure of the grains,” says Dubrovinskaia. “These materials may come to play an important role in industry.”Citation: Natalia Dubrovinskaia, Vladimir L. Solozhenko, Nobuyoshi Miyajima, Vladimir Dmitriev, Oleksandr O. Kurakevych, and Leonid Dubrovinsky, “Superhard nanocomposite of dense polymorphs of boron nitride: Noncarbon material has reach diamond hardness.” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 101912 (2007)Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more