23 Jun

Part 1: Top 14 comings and goings – Bayonne to La Rochelle

first_imgThe Top 14 is the most moneyed domestic league in the world, so where are the players heading, here’s the essential transfer news Former Ireland and Leinster Bernard Jackman has been promoted to Director of Rugby and among the new arrivals this season are scrum-half David Mélé, Canberra Raiders wing Sisa Waqa and second row Aly Muldowney, who makes the move from Connacht. There are only a handful of departures with Irish scrum-half James Hart joining Racing 92 and centre Jackson Willison signing for Worcester.La RochelleA season that began ominously with a 44-6 thrashing at home to Clermont improved and La Rochelle finished ninth, although they failed to win once on the road. The arrival of All Black flanker Victor Vito and fly-half Brock James will strengthen the squad for the new campaign, with the latter’s vast experience gained during a decade at Clermont sure to prove invaluable.World Cup winner: Victor Vito brings with him 33-caps of All Blacks experience As the Top 14 clubs start returning this week from their summer holidays to begin preparing for the new season next month, Gavin Mortimer runs an eye over the comings and goings. Veteran Welsh prop Ben Broster makes the short journey to Bayonne from Biarritz and he’ll be joined the front-row by Italian and former Wasps prop Lorenzo Cittadini. Sixteen of last season’s squad depart including Blair Stewart, the Kiwi fly-half who has retired after eight years playing in France.Bordeaux-Bègles In finishing seventh in the Top 14 – the same position as 2014-15 – Bordeaux have qualified for the Champions Cup again but without playing in the same expansive style as the previous season. Manager Raphael Ibanez came in for criticism in some sections of the French press after Bordeaux suffered a slump in form in the spring. At his end of season press conference, Ibanez dismissed talk that the club was “in crisis”, saying: “Yes, our style was less flamboyant [than last season] but the Top 14 is a championship of rucks, not passes.”Star turn: Ireland’s Ian Madigan is one of the big names to go to Bordeaux Leaving it behind: Brock James is leaving the mighty Clermont for La Rochelle LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Bayonne Relegated to the ProD2 in May 2015, the Basque club have bounced straight back up after beating Aurillac in the play-off to clinch the second spot behind Lyon. Notable among their 23 new recruits are Scotland No 8 Johnnie Beattie, who arrives from Castres, and former All Black lock Tom Donnelly, who spent last season at Montpellier.Experience: Lorenzo Cittadini has 50 caps for Italy Widely travelled: 63-cap Puma wing Horacio Agulla arrived from BathOn the other hand, Castres have welcomed a couple of experienced South-Africans in prop Daniel Kotze (Clermont) and hooker Jody Jenneker (Oyonnax), along with French locks Thibault Lassalle and Loic Jacquet, Steve Mafi from Western Force and arriving from Bath is Argentine threequarter Horacio Agulla.Clermont Dumped out of the Champions Cup at the pool stage, and beaten by Racing 92 in the semi-final of the Top 14, Clermont endured by their standards a disappointing season. With rumours of squad unrest midway through the campaign, coach Franck Azema knows he need silverware this season to keep his critics at bay.Midfield maestro: Remi Lamerat is part of the French squad and highly-ratedA couple of faithful servants have left Clermont after a decade of service with lock Jamie Cudmore relocating to Oyonnax and Aussie fly-half Brock James signing for La Rochelle. Jonathan Davies has returned to Wales and Daniel Kotze is now with Castres. Azema has largely kept faith with last season’s squad with Osprey prop Aaron Jarvis and Castres centre Remi Lamerat the most eye-catching of the six signings.Grenoble An impressive European Challenge Cup campaign saw Grenoble beat Connacht in the quarters to set up a semi-final clash against Harlequins. Though unsuccessful the cup run proved the quality in the Grenoble squad and what they need to add this season in the Top 14 is consistency if they’re to improve on 11th position.Irish connection: Bernard Jackman has persuaded Aly Muldowney to join him in Grenoble The most notable addition is Julien Ledevedec, the 30-year-old second row who impressed on his Test debut for France last month in Argentina. Joining him from Bordeaux is Patrick Toetu, the veteran Samoan-Kiwi prop, while another man bringing plenty of experience to Brive will be full-back Benjamin Lapeyre, of Toulon, Racing and, most recently, La Rochelle.CastresThe 2013 champions exceeded expectations this year by finishing sixth, putting behind them memories of the previous season when they avoided relegation by the skin of their teeth. Nonetheless the 2016-17 will be a challenge for Castres following a raft of departures. Scotland lock Richie Gray and Samoan flanker Piula Faʻasalele have joined Toulouse, France centre Remi Lamerat is now with Clermont, Johnnie Beattie is at Bayonne, Rudi Wulf at Lyon, as is prop Karena Wihongi. Among the prominent arrivals for next season are Aussie lock Luke Jones and Ireland fly-half Ian Madigan, while several stalwarts have hung up their boots, including former Springbok scrum-half Heini Adams and Kiwi Matt Clarkin. The loss of fly-half Pierre Barnard to Toulon, wing Sofiane Guitoune to Toulouse and Julien Ledevedec to Brive will also leave sizeable gaps in the squad.Brive A solid season for Brive, who narrowly missed out on qualification for the Champions Cup but who nonetheless can take satisfaction in finishing eighth with just one defeat at home (to Clermont). Compared to some of their rivals Brive have resisted the urge to shake up their squad with just a handful of players released and only six new arrivals.Late bloomer: Julien Ledevedec made his France debut last month and impressed Another new signing is 24-year-old South African centre Paul Jordaan, who joins from the Sharks, while among those departing are scrum-half Julien Audy (Bordeaux) and Jean-Pascal Barraque (France Sevens).For the Lyon to Toulouse transfers, click here.last_img read more

23 Jun

Women’s World Cup 2017: Day One review

first_img Undoubtedly the pick of the first round of pool games from the Women’s World Cup was Ireland v Australia.The hosts went into the game as overwhelming favourites, Australia having played just five Tests in the three years since the last global showpiece and been heavily beaten by England, New Zealand and Canada during the International Women’s Series in June.Yet the Wallaroos showed a remarkable upturn in form to push Ireland all the way at UCD Bowl in Dublin, with the Irish eventually sneaking home 19-17 in the Pool C clash – much to the delight of the vocal crowd.Tight tussle: Ireland and Australia had a physical battle up front. Photo: Getty ImagesHaving seen their scrum demolished by Canada in June, the biggest surprise was the performance of the Wallaroos forward pack. On a couple of occasions they drove Ireland off their own ball and the hosts never enjoyed the ascendency in that area that they would have expected. Australia’s physicality at the breakdown also meant Ireland struggled to introduce any flow to their game – and they didn’t help themselves by playing deep behind the gain-line.Given the line speed of Australia’s defence, Ireland may have been better served putting boot to ball, turning those defenders and chasing hard, but it was a rarely-used option. The absence of Niamh Briggs, the full-back who was ruled out with injury last week, no doubt affected their kicking options.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREIreland coach Tom Tierney recognised the imperfect nature of the performance but was simply relieved to get the four points. “It’s a win and that’s brilliant,” he said. “There’s a lot of pressure on the girls and a there was a lot of tension before and during the game. In key areas we let ourselves down at critical times. But we got the win and personally I don’t care how we win as long as we win.”Ireland’s failure to secure a bonus point could come back to haunt them in the battle to reach the semi-finals. Beat Japan and France in their next two games, and they will be in the last four as Pool C winners. But if they lose to France in that decisive game next Thursday, they are likely to miss out on the best runners-up spot with both New Zealand and Canada securing five-point wins on the opening day and set to do the same in round two.Red alert: Magali Harvey scored five tries in Canada’s 98-0 win over Hong Kong. Photo: InphoFrance looked sharp as they ran in 12 tries in a 72-14 win over Japan, while the Black Ferns saw off Wales 44-12 and Canada fell two points short of reaching a century as they thumped World Cup first-timers Hong Kong 98-0, Magali Harvey scoring five tries.Defending champions England kicked off their campaign with a 56-5 win over Spain. They scored ten tries in all with wing Kay Wilson bagging four of them, the second from a perfectly weighted Katy Mclean cross-kick. They will want to improve the effectiveness of their set-piece against Italy in game two on Sunday but they secured the requisite five points.Fab four: England wing Kay Wilson runs in one of her four tries against Spain. Photo: Getty Images“Having been at the last World Cup, it was a typical opening game and full credit to Spain, who never stopping coming at us,” said England coach Simon Middleton. “They showed great energy and commitment, which is what you’d expect – there will be no gimmes. The score didn’t reflect how well Spain played and their endeavour. It was a great start for us but there’s plenty more to come.”Middleton will make a lot of changes for Italy, who lost 24-12 to the USA in their first match. Every player in the 28-woman squad has been promised game time in the first two matches so those players who have not yet featured, the likes of Tamara Taylor and Natasha Hunt, will be involved against Italy.Women’s World Cup 2017 – Day One resultsPool ANew Zealand 44-12 WalesCanada 98-0 Hong Kong Green machine: Sophie Spence celebrates Ireland’s narrow win with fans. Photo: Getty Images Pool B England 56-5 SpainUSA 24-12 ItalyPool CIreland 19-17 AustraliaFrance 72-14 JapanSunday 13 August fixturesNew Zealand v Hong Kong (noon)England v Italy (2.30pm)USA v Spain (2.45pm)Canada v Wales (5pm)Ireland v Japan (5.15pm) TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A look at all the happenings on the opening day of the Women’s World Cup in Dublin France v Australia (7.45pm)last_img read more

23 Jun

Lawrence Dallaglio Q&A on leadership

first_img Lawrence Dallaglio was 25 when he became England captain at the start of the Clive Woodward era in 1997. He proved a natural for the job, leading his country on 22 occasions, whilst he also holds the record for the most English Premiership matches as a captain – 142 for Wasps during a golden age for the club. Leadership consultant Andy Bird, author of a new book called The Inspired Leader, interviewed Dallaglio about his leadership insights and here Rugby World publishes what this legendary rugby figure had to say…Lawrence, what does leadership mean to you?“In rugby there has to be someone prepared to make a decision, one way or another. I’ve found a lot of people are quite risk averse and wait for others to do something first.As a leader, when you’re faced with several different directions you can go in, you need the confidence to say: ‘We’re going to go that way.’ Now, it may not be the right way, and you have to acknowledge that. But someone has got to make a decision; you have to be prepared to put your marker down: ‘We haven’t got much time, let’s get on with it.’”How did you handle becoming a team captain at such a young age?“I felt a real sense of honour when I was given the captaincy, because you know there’s so much hierarchy and heritage involved. There were people in the team who were a lot older and more experienced than me, so in many ways it was quite daunting. You’re suddenly leading a team of people who might be looking at you and saying: ‘What’s he doing? Why would I listen to him?’”Team talk: addressing his charges during his second match as England captain, in November 1997But I felt I just had to grab it by the scruff of the neck and go with it. So, for me it was about drawing on the strengths of everyone in the team.You have to recognise, as a leader, that you certainly don’t have all the answers yourself. Neither do you necessarily have all the skills you need. And there’s nothing wrong with that. You’ve got to do what you’ve got to do with what you’ve got, but never be afraid to pull other people in. That’s the best way to get results.”What do you mean by that exactly?“It’s important to give other people responsibility and let them take the lead role at times – and also some of the pressure. Some people naturally shy away from it; some people are probably chomping at the bit to take on more. You have to recognise that and dial people up and down a bit. It’s about getting the chemistry right within the team.Success is never down to one person and I don’t think it should ever be attributed to one person, although it often is. And neither should failure be down to one person.Great eight: holding off Ally Hogg in a 2005 Heineken Cup match v EdinburghYou certainly can’t put yourself on a pedestal. Really good leaders acknowledge the contribution of everyone. It’s about having the selflessness to be able to share the responsibility and the success, because it’s the greatest feeling in the world when you achieve something and you can share it with other people.”What else did you learn about finding success as a leader?“Sport is a results-driven business. Ultimately you’re judged as a leader based on what you achieve and the scores are there for everyone to see, every match, every week. It’s about having the ability to not just get the best out of yourself – which is really important by the way – but also to get the best out of your colleagues.The best way to lead is by example. That doesn’t mean being overly brave or anything stupid like that. It’s about doing your job to the highest possible standard. If you can be one of the very best operators in the world in your position, then that’s going to make a lot of people aspire to get there as well. If you’re talking about driving standards and moving things forward, you’ve got to be moving forward yourself as well. That is fundamental.On camera: Dallaglio talks to Martin Bayfield this season in his role as a BT Sport pundit (Getty)The other thing about leading is that you need a clear understanding of what you want to achieve. You set yourself a target or a benchmark and then everything you do has to live up to that vision. If you want to be the best in the world at something, you can’t kid yourself that you’ll get there by doing what everyone else does. You have to decide, as a leader, how you’re going to drive towards your targets and how everyone else is going to drive towards them.You then have to measure yourself against those benchmarks every step of the way. You’ve got to look at yourself in the mirror and say, ‘Well, if that’s what we want to achieve…’”How do you go about doing that in practice?“There has to be an honesty and a frankness that you live by in the feedback you give to each other. Having the uncomfortable conversations together allows you to move forward and grow quickly. It’s not easy but it’s really important to get to a position of trust amongst a group where you feel that you can open up, because that’s the only way you learn.”Men of substance: the England side pictured a few months before they won the 2003 World Cup (Getty)Where did your own inspiration come from as a leader?“A lot of my aspirations and goal-setting came from my childhood. I was given a lot of care and consideration and love, but also the opportunity to have real ambition in life.My parents, particularly my mother, were adamant that you should set your goals really high – shoot for the moon and you’ll reach the stars. That gave me the confidence and the belief that anything you want to achieve is possible in life. I know that sounds a bit fancy but it’s not actually. It gives you a platform from which you feel anything can be attainable.If you’re going to do something, you should do it to the best of your ability. That’s key. A lot of people end up doing something that they obviously have a passion for but how often do they ask themselves, every day: ‘How well am I doing this?’ and then push it to the limit. Follow the leader: Lawrence Dallaglio in 2004, when he was reappointed England captain (Getty Images) * Andy Bird’s book, The Inspired Leader: How Leaders can Discover, Experience and Maintain their Inspiration, is published by Bloomsbury Business, RRP £14.99. Buy it here.Follow your dreams: Dallaglio has given so much back since putting his boots away (Getty) Lionheart: in action for the Lions v Bay of Plenty before breaking his ankle later in the matchSo it all started for me at a young age, but then you get inspired by other people along the way. There’s nothing quite like a competitive environment, where you’re working alongside your peers. You get inspired by them because you want to keep driving the standards up.Leadership for me is a two-way process. It’s about challenging people that work or play with you, but it’s also about them challenging you too. That’s how you develop and become a much stronger person.”Are there any particular experiences that proved important moments of inspiration?“I lost my sister when I was 16 and that had a profound impact on me (Francesca was 19 when she died in the 1989 Marchioness disaster). It became a constant source of motivation. Firstly, to try to ease my own pain – it gave me something to get behind. Secondly, for my family, who were in a very difficult place. Life changed after that, for all of them.World champion: displaying the Webb Ellis Cup from an open-top bus during England’s victory parade“So I was driven by a desire to bring some enjoyment or something back into their lives. It just became personal. I was trying to put all the emotion, everything, into trying to honour the memory of my sister and to make life better for my parents. Every time I had any kind of worry or anxiety, or any kind of challenge when I was not quite sure about moving things forward, I would always use that as a real driving purpose.”Has this sense of purpose influenced your leadership in other ways?“For me it was more than just a job. It became much more spiritual and emotional and I was able to tap into the emotional feelings inside to drive something that became greater than just about the rugby.Emotional response: the tears flow in his last match for Wasps – the 2008 Premiership final (Getty)When you’re up against the very best, you’re kind of neck and neck, because everyone trains really hard and everyone works really hard. Where you can get an edge over an evenly matched opponent is through what’s going on in your head and your heart. If you can find the right emotional touchpoints in people, it doesn’t matter what’s being said in the changing room next door – they’ve got no chance because the game is very emotional.That’s why great teams get beaten by teams that aren’t quite as great. They have found an emotional hook that takes their performance to a different, super-charged level. Everyone’s got that performance – no matter how well you play, there’s always another level you can play at. You just have to try and find that emotional hook.”When the time came for you to retire from rugby, how did you go about handling the transition?“If I’m honest, I was actually quite excited by the transition. Rugby was very kind to me and I had a brilliant time. But you also have to sacrifice a huge amount and the other people around me had to sacrifice a huge amount.Growing the game: passing on his knowledge during a 2013 coaching session in Hounslow (Getty)So rather than thinking ‘What can I do now?’, it was more like: ‘Wow, what can’t I do now?’ The glass is not half-empty, it’s half-full, because rugby got in the way of a lot of things.I knew I had pursued a career in rugby up to the age of 35 and I’d got to the top of my profession. So I reckon I could get to the top of any profession if I put my mind to it. You have to take that confidence, that belief, and the experience and skill-set you’ve built up, and then start applying them to something else.”You’ve ended up with a fascinating portfolio of activities, from TV punditry to setting up a charity and a sports marketing business with BBH. Is that working out well for you?“Yes, I suppose I’m in a nice position in that I’ve got a few different things going on. I like the variety. I was always fascinated by the world of business and even when I was playing, I was very passionate about giving something back.”Can you tell me more about your charitable activities?“With success comes responsibility. I’m a firm believer that you arrive with nothing in this world and you leave with nothing, but you can make an impact during the bit in-between in lots of different ways. It’s not just about making money and providing for yourself and the people around you. There are other ways of leaving your mark and I think once you’ve taken something you should give and pass it on.Fierce competitor: Dallaglio’s passion is clear as he celebrates a try against Wales in 2007 (Getty)That’s what led me to set up the Dallaglio Foundation. It’s been going for nine years now and we work with young disadvantaged people who have been excluded from mainstream education. Using rugby and the values of rugby as a hook, I deliver a programme that starts by giving these guys back some self-confidence and a bit of pride. We then take them on a three-year journey to get them back into full-time education or employment.So many of these kids come from a chaotic background and all they need is a bit of support or help or encouragement. I’m really passionate about it – I genuinely believe there is a problem in society and this is one way of helping deal with it.”FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERETo finish, if you could give other leaders one tip to help them get better at inspiring other people, what would it be?“For me, it’s about the way you carry yourself. The best way to inspire people is to give them positive energy. In the same way as you feed off other people, other people feed off you. In every interaction you have with people, try to have a positive interaction.You can’t always think about yourself all the time – you have to put other people first. The greatest thing in life is giving and it doesn’t have to be a present – you can give your time, your feelings, your thoughts. So that, for me, is the best way to inspire people – just give them your energy.”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A former world champion in both 15s and sevens, Lawrence Dallaglio is one of the greatest captains that rugby has seen. Here he explains what makes a successful leader last_img read more

23 Jun

Rugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: Osaka

first_imgTOP TIPGet an Osaka Amazing Pass. Available for one or two days, it gives you unlimited use of trains and buses in the Osaka area as well as discounts for 35 popular tourist sites. TAGS: Japan Tickle your tastebuds in the place known as the ‘nation’s kitchen’ Advertising FeatureRugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: OsakaSEEThe World Cup takes place at the same time as the Hiraoka Shrine Autumn Festival, so you can experience the sights and sounds of local culture up close.Take in the ‘aqua metropolis’, as it has been described, by travelling around the city’s many rivers on one of the various forms of water transport. At night, there are impressive light displays on the bridges and river walls.Osaka is also a great base for exploring the historical sights of Kyoto, Nara and Wakayama because they are all destinations that are easily and quickly accessible from the city.DOYou won’t get bored with the nightlife in Osaka. Head to Dotonbori, where you can grab street food as you take a stroll along the river and enjoy the neon lights.Another area to explore is Hozenji Yokocho, an alleyway with 60 small bars and restaurants serving myriad styles, and if you want local craft beers in a Western-style pub, Beer Belly in the Tenjinbashi district is the place to go.Cruise control: Take a boat tripEATOsaka provides a feast for foodies, from Michelin-starred restaurants to more casual dining options like okonomiyaki, which translates as ‘grill what you like’ and could be described as a cross between an omelette and a pancake. Another local favourite is takoyaki, which is octopus inside a spherical pancake batter. Wash it all down with an Asahi beer – the brewery was founded in Osaka in 1889. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Autumn spectacle: The Hiraoka Shrine Festival TOURIST WEBSITEosaka-info.jp/enWORLD CUP VISITOsaka is known in Japan as ‘Rugby Mecca’ and will host four RWC 2019 matches – Italy v Namibia, Argentina v Tonga, Georgia v Fiji and USA v Tonga – at Hanazono Stadium, the country’s first rugby ground that was built in 1929. Higashiosaka, where the stadium is located, declared itself ‘The City of Rugby’ in 1991. It’s also close to another host city, Kobe.Related: Rugby World Cup venuesRugby Mecca: Osaka will host four World Cup gamesGETTING THEREThe bullet train to Osaka takes two-and-a-half hours from Tokyo or catch a direct flight to Osaka International Airport.DID YOU KNOW? Hanazono has hosted Japan’s National High School Rugby Tournament since 1963 and is being redeveloped ahead of the World Cup.last_img read more

23 Jun

The Greatest Six Nations XV

first_img Six Nations Kits What will each team wear during the 2020… Terrible Two: O’Driscoll and O’Connell formed the core of Ireland’s brilliant teams (Getty Images) Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Collapse Expand Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Dotting Down: Jenkins scores the key try as wales secured a Grand Slam in 2005 (Getty Images)There were plenty who questioned his scrum technique but he found a way to survive in the tight, and that was good enough because Jenkins was one of the great footballing props of all time, up there in Wales with Graham Price.He tackled like a tank yet had a softness of touch with the ball in hand that defied the bulk of the man all of Wales seemed to call ‘Melon’.2 Raphaël Ibañez (France)French Quality: Ibanez was a sublime forward for Les Bleus (Getty Images)Famed this side of the Channel for his illustrious career at Wasps, Ibañez was an outstanding hooker in his France days, unforgiving in the set-piece and remarkably mobile in the loose.He retired from the Test arena in 2003 but was good enough to force Bernard Laporte to court his return to the international game. He did more than merely return. Laporte selected him to captain his country in an extended swansong, which highlighted this exceptional hooker’s abilities.3 Tadhg Furlong (Ireland)Modern Prop: Furlong does everything to a high standard (Getty Images)Forget the longevity rule, the Ireland tighthead’s exceptional form in the past few years makes him an automatic pick for this team – and one of the most exciting prospects for years to come.Here is a front-row forward who approaches scrummaging with the 
relish of an old-style Five Nations 
prop whilst carrying and tackling like 
a modern Kiwi.He has the technical abilities of Gethin Jenkins but without any of the question marks which swirled around the Welshman’s scrummaging.He is the complete player who, like Stuart Hogg, has great things ahead.4 Martin Johnson (England, captain)Leads from the front: Johnson led by example as captain of England (Getty Images)The second row was as difficult a call as any when picking this team. Fabien Pelous and Alun Wyn Jones have not made the cut. That tells you something about the quality of the pair included.This Tiger began his career as an uncomplicated hard man. He finished 
as England’s most garlanded player, captaining them to the World Cup.Along with many of the Woodward team, he developed a running and handling game, a little like Jones these days. But it was as an unforgiving enforcer with immense leadership 
for which he will be remembered 
on the rugby battlefields of Europe.5 Paul O’Connell (Ireland)The ‘other’ totemic presence in Ireland’s 2009 Grand Slam side. O’Connell gave what I would regard as the greatest display of second-row play when Ireland ‘welcomed’ England to Croke Park for the first time in 2007. He dominated the airways at lineout and restart like few, if any, have done before or since.He’s a man of presence, someone you follow without asking questions. Willie John McBride is a legend but in the first decade of the 21st century, O’Connell eclipsed him as the greatest Irish lock.6 Richard Hill (England)Unseen Beast: Hill did all the work every great flanker does (Getty Images)Another of the World Cup contingent to make it. Hill was good enough to be a Lions Test seven, even as he set about quietly influencing every game he played as a blindside. ‘Unseen work’ is a phrase I dislike and distrust, so easy to justify the work of a favourite, but none have merited the sobriquet quite like Hill.He was so good at doing so many things without fuss that it’s hard to recall one single moment. But he wasn’t a moment man, he was an 80 minutes perpetual motion sort of flanker.7 Sam Warburton (Wales)Day of the Jackal: Warburton was a genius at the breakdown (Getty Images)I am not sure whether 
the Wales openside was even the best Six Nations openside of his generation. When fit, Ireland’s Sean O’Brien is an equal menace as a jackler and a different class as a ball-carrier. However, endurance, if not everything, counts for plenty and while Warburton was brittle in club colours, for Wales he was a dauntless warrior and notable captain.Not a natural in the Shane Williams Welsh way, but a man of passion, no small intelligence and integrity.8 Lawrence Dallaglio (England)Swiss Army Knife: Dallaglio could do everything at number 8 (Getty Images)There’s no Sergio Parisse, no Italian presence, so my old mate ‘Bruno’ will have 
to be the nearest thing in the team to 
an Italian representative.One of four World Cup winners in the side, Dallaglio brought an indomitable will to every Six Nations game he played. ‘Remorseless’ is the right word for the Wasp who never died wondering on the field of play. Others were more skilful – Imanol Harinordoquy say – but none had the same drive and self-belief to lift those around him like ‘Big Lol’.Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Six Nations Kits Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Former England fly-half Stuart Barnes turns selector to pick his ‘dream team’ of players since the championship expanded in 2000 The Greatest Six Nations XVThe greatest Six Nations team of the century? ‘Six’ is the key word. We are about to be in the 21st year of this brave new world where Italy joined the party. Forget the famous Five Nations, the focus is on what is essentially the modern professional code – with apologies to some of the lags who crossed between the epochs.Indeed, some of those veterans 
made it from the last to this millennium, players who I played with have made the team. Only a few, and they were exceptional. In the main, excellence goes with longevity as the criteria 
for selection. Sympathy for countries which have struggled plays no part 
in the choices. So here we go.15 Stuart Hogg (Scotland)Unpredictable: Hogg has been wowing crowds for years (Getty Images)The Player of the Championship in both 2016 and 2017, the Glasgow Warrior has overtaken Gavin Hastings as the greatest Scottish full-back of them all. Never afraid to 
use his speed on the counter-attack, 
in the past three years he has added better decision-making to his physical attributes and his astonishing boot.An inspiring presence in attack and defence, there have been few full-backs to stand comparison with this flying Scot. And unlike all bar one other in this XV, we can hope the best is still to come.14 Jason Robinson (England)Billy Whizz: Robinson was rapid on the wing for England (Getty Images)If there was one player who could have ousted Hogg it was the league convert. Coming off the bench against Italy in 2001 he looked out of his depth, but it was one of Clive Woodward’s greatest decisions to make the premature introduction.In no time he was repeating his 
Wigan wizardry in the Six Nations, 
first as a wing and then as a full-back. His try against France in 2002, one-against-one from a scrum, made the game look impossibly easy; if 
you possessed a Jason Robinson.13 Brian O’Driscoll (Ireland)This was the most straightforward of all the selections. The former Ireland centre is one of the greatest of all rugby players. He drove Ireland to their first Grand Slam since 1948, as adept at the short-range score as the dazzling hat-trick of tries which marked his arrival on the Test scene in Paris.Scything in attack, he was equally accomplished in defence (a nod for his sidekick, Gordon D’Arcy, on this theme).If he had a weakness, it was his long passing game, but with the arrival of 
Joe Schmidt as coach that relative fault was eradicated. The most complete player in this Six Nations composite.12 Yannick Jauzion (France)Coolness Personified: Jauzion glided around the field (Getty Images)If O’Driscoll is the most complete 21st-century centre of the Six Nations elite, none approach the elegance that Jauzion brought to the game. Nothing seemed to happen in 
a hurry but the 6ft 4in former France centre had the knack of drawing defenders into his orbit and creating space for those players around him.The most languid of movers, he played as if he had all the time in the world. He had a game of aesthetic beauty.11 Shane Williams (Wales)Small stature: He may have been small, but he was tougher to stop than anybody (Getty Images)It took Wales a while to trust Williams but he didn’t hold 
it against them. The man 
of phenomenal footwork sidestepped off his wing and played a far from peripheral part in two Grand Slams.Here was the quintessential Welshman, smaller than his opponent but so full of craft and guile that few could lay a hand on one of the 21st century’s great rugby entertainers.In a nation famed for its wings, nobody is more revered in Welsh wing history than the fleet-footed Williams.10 Johnny Sexton (Ireland)Unflappable: Sexton always delivers under pressure (Getty Images)This was arguably the toughest call to make. Sexton was supreme in the manner in which he guided Ireland to their 2018 Slam but all of England (or its vast majority) will be up in arms at the absence of a certain Jonny Wilkinson.From 2000-03 Wilkinson was magnificent, especially his performance in the 2003 Grand Slam win in Dublin, but thereafter he was injured/average.Sexton has been hugely consistent since filling the boots of Ronan O’Gara; a ten of iron will with the coolest of heads.Sexton, frequently the torturer 
of the English, it is who gets the nod.9 Dwayne Peel (Wales)Controlled the game: Dwayne Peel was excellent at dictating matches for Wales (Getty Images)Often in the shadow of the more robust Mike Phillips, yet when Peel was running the show from the base of the scrum, Wales were a far more attractive team 
to watch and a tougher one to stop.There was a fluidity to his pass and 
a sly ability to pick the gap around the fringes that made him a rare talent, if a somewhat underestimated one at times, despite this creature of beguiling instinct being a Lions Test player in NZ in 2005. Who is leading the way in the Six… Six Nations Table 2021 1 Gethin Jenkins (Wales) Six Nations Table 2021 Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations…last_img read more

23 Jun

Sarah Hunter: How to control the ball at No 8

first_img Experience: Sarah Hunter is a Test centurion for England (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Wales lock gives his tips for getting… Jake Polledri on how to be a top ball-carrier Expand The England Women’s captain gives her tips for dictating play at the back of the scrum Cory Hill: How to catch in a lineout Cory Hill: How to catch in a lineout England Women’s full-back Danielle Waterman gives her top… Collapse Practise footwork “If you have dominance near the line, you need to control the ball as you go for a pushover. It’s important to feel comfortable with the ball on both your left and right foot and we do a drill around the posts. You can bind to a post in a similar position to a scrum and then work your feet – practising with left and right – as you move around it with the ball.”This article originally appeared in the November 2017 edition of Rugby World magazine. Danielle Waterman: How to sidestep Jake Polledri on how to be a top ball-carrier Danielle Waterman: How to sidestep “There will be a call before a scrum but sometimes things can change, so you have to adapt. If you’re under any pressure, the backs won’t want the ball; you can’t give them ball off a retreating scrum, so you need to try to get front-foot ball with a pick-and-go.”MORE SKILLS ADVICE… Jake Polledri, the formidable Gloucester and Italy ball-carrier,… Expand Sarah Hunter: How to control the ball at No 8World Cup winner in 2014, World Rugby Women’s Player of the Year in 2016, a Test centurion… Sarah Hunter has a wealth of experience in the game. One skill the England No 8 particularly excels at is controlling the ball at the base of the scrum and here she explains how you can do it to…Stay involved“Generally you want to stay in the scrummage. If you have 
to go digging, you’re not adding weight, and that means it’s seven versus eight and it’s hard to get good ball.”Keep watch“The key at No 8 is watching the ball – as soon as you lose sight of the ball, it ends up ten metres behind you! So track the ball from when the nine puts it in to which channel it comes down. And don’t rush anything – take your time
 to make a decision.”Decision time Every month Rugby World features advice from professional players and coaches on specific skills. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

23 Jun

Samson Rising – the Cornish rugby player who found strength in adversity

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS He had no phone and no tools, and no one knew he was there! An horrendous weekend of incarceration loomed until he engineered an ingenious escape using sodden shoelaces.Healing hands: class activity at the Samson Centre. Hambly is vice-chairman of the MS charity it housesHe was tubby as a boy and bullied horrifically – his tormentor was eventually expelled for putting a firework in someone’s mouth and lighting it. Rugby helped give Hambly confidence and later, after this fishing enthusiast left the safety of a job in a field sports shop to venture out in the world, it brought him friendship and memories to treasure forever.Some of his youthful behaviour, some of the mistakes he made, are things you may well relate to from personal experience. And not just wearing a shiny green New Romantic suit to work in the second week of his surveyor job – his other suit had been ruined by a passing pigeon after Hambly fell asleep during his lunch break in a park!He says he pondered whether to include the chapter called Together, in which he relates heartbreaking stories of rugby team-mates who have lost children young. In a variant of that, OAs lock Andy Hickman felt unwell during a match on the day of the 1994 England-Wales game and left the field. Before the day was out, he had died of an aortic aneurysm.Famous day: Hambly captained Old Actonians when they gave London Welsh a fright in the 1990 Middlesex Cup competitionThe first cracks in Hambly’s own happy world began in 1991, when he noticed that “something wasn’t right” about a month before he ran the London Marathon. He was a very fit 28-year-old at the time and during the marathon itself was on track to beat 3hr 10min, thus earning extra sponsorship money. Instead, his running gait became lopsided and it took him more than an hour to complete the final three miles.It wasn’t until 1999, when he was 36, that MS was eventually diagnosed. By that stage Hambly’s wife Marion was expecting the third of their four children. “I wasn’t exactly sitting in a corner rocking back and forth with my head in my hands,” says Hambly, “but the portal to an all-consuming black hole of depression lurked very close.”Family portrait: Hambly with wife Marion and their four girls in 2017His response to such cruel misfortune, finding the energy to help so many others, has been awe-inspiring. Dylan Hartley, who provides the foreword, says Hambly possesses mana, a Maori word that in this case reflects “a singular sort of bravery, the moral courage to think of others instead of yourself”.Enormous credit must also go to Old Actonians, in particular. The club has raised hundreds of thousands of pounds over the past 17 years without ever thinking their own part in creating and running the Samson Centre is done. BUY NOW from AmazonSamson Rising is published by United Writers Cornwall, RRP £18.95. A donation of £1 will be made to the Samson Centre for every copy sold.The publishers have kindly given us six copies to give away – enter our competition for your chance to win a copy of Samson Rising.Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door. Samson Rising – the Cornish rugby player who found strength in adversityAmong the likes of Lewis Hamilton, Jimmy Greaves and Rob Baxter on the New Year Honours list was John Hambly OBE. If you were unaware until now or recently of this Cornishman’s rugby exploits with Truro and Old Actonians, you are in good company.Indeed, his book, Samson Rising, which features his experiences with those two fine clubs, would never have been published had he accepted the advice of those who told him, in good faith, that there would be little interest in the story of someone not remotely ‘famous’.Thank goodness Hambly ploughed on regardless because Samson Rising, published by United Writers Cornwall, is a marvellous and inspiring read. It will almost certainly make you cry as well as laugh and quite probably make you question your limitations as a human being. BUY NOW from AmazonHambly, 58, has spent more than half his life suffering from multiple sclerosis, yet rose above it so impressively that he founded a facility in Guildford – called the Samson Centre for MS – to benefit those living with this brutal disease.The MS charity located there has more than 200 members, 11 paid staff and 40-plus volunteers, and provides around 10,000 treatment sessions a year.It’s a far cry from 2002, when he attended his first meeting of the charity, the MS Therapy Group (Guildford). At that time, the group met in a village hall and had 35 members, around a quarter of whom participated in the weekly exercise class.Haven: an aerial view of the Samson Centre, where MS patients receive practical and emotional supportHambly saw the potential for growth and became chairman of the charity the same year. He drove the project to find new premises and set about a mammoth fundraising effort that initially included a target of £250,000 in 18 months.His rugby mates and business contacts offered incredible support, and he relates some amusing stories of the sneaky tactics employed during Old Actonians dinner auctions to swell the fundraising coffers.Yet Hambly and others were also rattling tins outside supermarkets, garden centres and sports venues; on one occasion, they amassed more than £1,200 in two-and-a-half hours at Lingfield racecourse. Less successful was a stint in Leatherhead when he was abused by a Big Issue seller whose ‘patch’ he had inadvertently taken.Rugby camaraderie: Hambly with Zinzan Brooke, Jason Leonard and friends after a charity game in 2007All this Hambly did while dealing with a disease which he likens to mice nibbling away at the electric cabling of a large house. At the start of one chapter, he details an agonisingly difficult episode with the condition, and only at the end do you realise he was describing the ten minutes it took to get out of bed and stand up.Hambly is in the remitting/relapsing bracket of MS – so some periods are better than others – but it is a remorseless foe all the same. “Gradually a rolling gait became a limp, a walking stick became crutches, and a self-propelled wheelchair became a motorised one,” he writes.However, Samson Rising is much, much more than a book about Hambly’s MS and his charitable work. It’s also a superbly written account of a normal life: growing up in Cornwall, leaving home for the first time, the trials and tribulations of student days in Leicester, the anxieties of starting big-city working life as a London building surveyor.On tour: leading Old Actonians off after a 1990 match against his home club Truro. OAs got a streaky win!He is a superb storyteller and one of his tales is included at the insistence of his daughter Ellie, such is her fascination with it. It concerns a Friday in May 2005 when Hambly rushed over to inspect an apartment in Holland Park just prior to a bank holiday weekend. Needing to use the toilet at the property, he shut the bathroom door behind him out of habit – only for the doorknob to break when he tried to exit. TAGS: Book Review Before the storm: John Hambly at St Ives in the Eighties, when life for him was blissfully uncomplicated John Hambly’s rugby career was cut short when he was diagnosed with MS. As his inspiring book Samson Rising relates, the body blow led him to a higher purpose Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

20 Jun

Anglican Consultative Council Digest: Nov. 6

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 6, 2012 Rector Bath, NC [Episcopal News Service – Auckland, New Zealand] Much happens each day during the Anglican Consultative Council‘s (ACC) 15th meeting. In addition to Episcopal News Service’s other coverage, here’s some of what else went on Nov. 6 (local time), the 11th day of the Oct. 27-Nov. 7 gathering.Standing Committee members electedThe ACC elected six of its members to fill six of the council’s seven seats on the 14-member Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion. They are:Juanildo Barrity, Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do BrasilHelen Biggin, Church in WalesBishop Eraste Bigirimana, Anglican Church of BurundiThe Rev. Sarah Macneil, Anglican Church of AustraliaSamuel Mukunya, Anglican Church of KenyaLouisa Mojela, Anglican Church of Southern AfricaDiocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas was elected to the Standing Committee during the previous meeting of the ACC in Jamaica in 2009 and his term continues.Anglican Communion primates hold five seats on the committee. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori is one of those five.Diocese of Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga and Elizabeth Paver from the Church of England hold seats on the committee by virtue of their status as ACC chair and vice chair.The archbishop of Canterbury is an ex officio member of the committee.‘Christian Zionism’ report accepted with revisions, offered as study resourceThe council accepted a slightly revised version of “Land of Promise? An Anglican exploration of Christian attitudes to the Holy Land, with special reference to ‘Christian Zionism,’” the 33,000-word report which stirred debate earlier in the meeting.The members passed another version of Resolution 15.32 expressing appreciation for the report and requesting that it be made available as a resource for the provinces to study.Christian Zionism is defined in the report as “a belief among some Christians that the return of the Jews to the Holy Land, and the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, is in accordance with biblical prophecy … and thus deserving of political, financial and religious support.”The report comes from a working group of the communion’s Network for Inter Faith Concerns.The portions that caused the most concern with some council members come in the final chapter called “Mapping Our Views” in which the original version had a 25-item list labeled “We agree that all Anglicans can and should affirm the following.” That heading has been changed to “We wish to affirm the following.”Explanatory wording at the beginning of that chapter has also been changed to make it clearer that the opinions expressed are those of the committee and not all Anglicans.Resolutions passed by council todayResolution 15.20 welcoming “Participating in God’s Communication” and recommending it to the provinces, that they “work to ensure that it is full equipped at all levels to share the good news of God’s kingdom in the 21st century, setting a goal of each province having a “qualified, senior provincial communicator” by ACC-16 and encouraging churches of the communion to celebrate Anglican Communion Sunday.Resolution 15.22 adopting the financial summary reports for the Anglican Communion, approving the 2012-2013 budgets and the projections for 2013 and 2014, and asking each province to meet its requested budget contribution (includes a projected three percent annual increase).Resolution 15.30 commending the Francophone Network, requesting the Anglican Communion Office gather translated key documents on the website to facilitate sharing, welcoming and encouraging provinces in translating documents into local languages and asking those translations to be sent to communion office, requesting the secretary general to report to ACC-16 on progress.Resolution 15.31 requesting the secretary general to explore and, with the approval of the Standing Committee, implement as appropriate, a capital campaign to provide endowment income for the programs of the communion.Resolution 15.35 expressing concern, compassion and prayers for Sudan, Great Lakes Region (including eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Somalia and Mali); thanksgiving for “the growing peace” between Sudan and South Sudan; empathy for African countries emerging from armed conflicts; urging prayer for victims of atrocities; condemning those responsible for violation of human rights; calling upon governments, U.N. and NGOs to support victims; offering support of initiatives for the restoration of peace and improvement of living conditions, asking governments to ensure “free, fair and peaceful” elections and supporting reconciliation processes in African nations.Resolution 15.38 welcoming participation of Anglican women to the next U.N. Commission on the Status of Women meeting in March 2013 and adopting the text of a written statement to the meeting.Some, but not all, of these resolutions have been posted here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Anglican Consultative Council Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Consultative Council Digest: Nov. 6 Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion, Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

20 Jun

New York adds a bishop suffragan candidate

first_imgNew York adds a bishop suffragan candidate The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Marcia Callender says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Elections Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Posted Oct 28, 2013 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (1) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Smithfield, NC November 10, 2013 at 3:13 pm Fr. Ward came to our church as the Interim Minister. As our search process began, our parish participated in focus groups to discuss what we were looking for in a new Rector. My son who is 13 years old, was listening to someone speaking Fr. Ward sermons. I explained to my son that Fr. Ward learned how to preach from the Southern Baptists, where I am sure some of the Preachers were Black. Malcolm turned and said “we need another Black Minister at Christ Church like Fr. Ward”. Fr. Ward sermons, as all he does brings a richness and realness to the words of God, that even a child can embrace. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Patrick J. Ward has satisfied the necessary requirements to be nominated by petition as a candidate for election as bishop suffragan, according to an Oct. 27 e-mail from the Episcopal Diocese of New York.Ward presently serves as interim rector of Christ Church in the Riverdale section of the Bronx.A petition process for submitting additional candidates closed Oct. 26.On Oct. 7, the diocese the Standing Committee of the diocese announced a slate of five nominees to stand for election as the diocese’s bishop suffragan.They are:The Rev. Kim L. Coleman, rector, Trinity Episcopal Church, Arlington, Virginia;The Rev. Canon Susan C. Harriss, rector, Christ’s Church, Rye, New York;The Rev. Kathleen L. Liles, rector, Christ & Saint Stephen’s Church, New York, New York;The Rev. Allen K. Shin, rector, St. John’s Episcopal Church, Huntington, Long Island, New York; andThe Rev. Mauricio J. Wilson, rector, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Oakland, California.The nominees will participate in a visit to the diocese Nov. 12-15, during which time they will meet with clergy and lay people of the diocese.The bishop suffragan election is scheduled to take place on Dec. 7.The bishop suffragan will succeed the Rt. Rev. Catherine Roskam who retired in 2011 after serving the diocese for 15 years.last_img read more

20 Jun

Archbishops call on church to pray for new disciples of…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Lambeth Palace press release] This Pentecost, the archbishops of Canterbury and York are calling on the church to pray for those who have not yet encountered the love of God in Jesus Christ.The call to prayer for evangelism at Pentecost, which is celebrated on Sunday (June 8), was the first task given to the Archbishops’ Evangelism Task Group by the General Synod of the Church of England in November last year. The Task Group was set up by the Synod to facilitate the outworking of the priority of “Intentional Evangelism.”Members of the Archbishops’ Evangelism Task Group have put together printed and online prayer resources, which are available at www.usewords.org. There is also a short video, which explores the question: “What is evangelism?”The archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, said: “The task before us cannot be overestimated. We could easily be disheartened. We cannot do it alone. But. . . Allelulia! For we are not thrown back on ourselves, but in, by and through the power of the Holy Spirit, God brings forth life. It is right that as the Evangelism Task Group considers how it may resource the Church to bear faithful witness to Jesus Christ, the commitment to pray is the essential first step. Prayer has to be our first priority, if we are to call more people to follow Christ, and to invite others to share in the story of God’s love for the world. The wonderful news is God is always ready to hear our prayers and to send his Spirit that we may proclaim the good news afresh. I urge every church community and individual to set aside time to pray and to share God’s heart for all his people.”The archbishop of York, John Sentamu, said: “Recently all the Bishops of the North of England met with a group of young adults from across the Province of York to pray and take counsel together ‘towards the re-evangelisation of the north of England’. It was wonderful to tread in the footsteps of St Aidan and St Cuthbert, who in their time told the people of the north the good news of Jesus Christ, rooting their proclamation in the practice of fervent prayer and praise. Praying for others to come to know Christ is a privilege and a joy – and loving our neighbours and making disciples of Jesus is exactly what we are called to do. At Pentecost we recall the wind and flame of the Holy Spirit coming upon the disciples, so let’s commit ourselves afresh to pray, for a new outpouring of the Holy Spirit, and for boldness, simplicity, wisdom, and compassion in the proclamation of the Gospel.”In calling the church to pray the archbishops are reaffirming, for all Christians in all times and in all places, the priority of prayer for new disciples of Jesus, and encouraging many ways in which this prayer takes shape.For the Task Group this is just the beginning of a process to encourage everyone in the church, young and old, to consider how best to witness to the love of God in Christ amongst families, friends, neighbours, colleagues, and to hold them before God in prayer.The call to prayer is not a one-off, but a call to a continuing openness, dependence upon, and imploring of God to work among us for the sake of others. Rather than launching a programme or a campaign, the Church is seeking to respond obediently afresh to the last words of Jesus, in both the Great Commission (Matthew 28: 16-30) and his charge to wait on the empowering presence of the Spirit (Acts 1:8). Tags Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Archbishops call on church to pray for new disciples of Jesus Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jun 4, 2014 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Communion Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more