21 Dec

Sharks’ defenseman adjusts to smaller role: “It’s definitely tough”

first_imgSAN JOSE — Coach Pete DeBoer talked extensively at the start of the season that some players were going to have to sacrifice some ice time this year simply because the Sharks had more depth throughout their lineup.In that sense, no player has been affected more through the first five-plus weeks of the season than defenseman Joakim Ryan, particularly in recent third periods.Ryan averaged 16:45 of ice time in 62 regular season games in his rookie year in 2017-18, but that’s down to an average …last_img read more

17 Dec

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast — December 1, 2017

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Rayn Martin 12-1-17No change in the short term forecast through next Tuesday. Behind the front that moved through yesterday, we have dry weather in for today, tomorrow and Sunday. Temps will be normal to above normal for daytime highs, but normal overnight (which is much cooler than we have become accustomed to recently). Sunshine will dominate through the period.Monday we start to see good southwest winds develop and most of the state will see another dry day with sunshine slowly followed by increasing clouds. Yesterday we mentioned our concern about some fringe moisture working into far NW Ohio for Monday. That moisture looks less impressive this morning, but we still can’t completely rule it out. Our feeling is that most of it will stay well west and north of us. But, there will at least be some clouds around as early as Monday morning and we still won’t rule out action over about 30% of far NW OH. Again, most of the rest of the state stays dry for Monday, but it gets windy and clouds increase through the day.Our next cold front arrives Monday night and goes through Tuesday and into very early Wednesday. Rain totals look to remain in that .25”-.75” range with coverage bumped to 90% of the state. We actually think that all areas have a really good shot at seeing at least the lower end of the range. Winds will be very gusty Tuesday as the front moves through. We won’t rule out 20-40 mph sustained winds. The map above is a snapshot of potential action Tuesday night. WE think the 1” rain totals projected by this model are overdone, but the spread and progression of the moisture is right in line with our thinking.A few tweaks to the rest of the 10 day forecast this morning. Behind the front we try to dry out, but we also see significantly colder air blasting into the region. This cold air comes on north winds, coming right across the great lakes region. We think now that we will see plenty of clouds in due to this lake enhancement, and we can’t even rule out some lake effect snow on Wednesday far northern Ohio. This can also trigger some light scattered rain showers off and on for Wednesday farther south over Ohio. Moisture availability is not significant…only a few hundredths for the most part, but we can’t rule it out. Coverage will be 40-50% or less.Clouds will stay part of the forecast through Thursday and Friday too as north winds continue, but they will not be as strong. We expect some sun, but not the bright, sunny set up that is expected here today and this weekend.The extended period has an upper level trough digging in over the eastern half to third of the country. This will keep temps on the defensive, mostly below normal through mid-month. IT also will mean we expect a pattern similar to the second half of next week right on through the 11-16 day forecast window. Our very pleasant finish to fall is about to become a little less pleasant as we move deeper into December.last_img read more

16 Dec

The History of Peeling Paint, Insulation, and Vapor Barriers

first_imgInsulation and the early building science researchersI’ve mentioned Bill Rose’s excellent book, Water in Buildings, in this space before, and it’s a wonderful resource. Chapter 3, “Water and Building Materials,” lays out the U.S. history of building science research spurred by the paint-peeling episode of those early adopters of insulation. RELATED ARTICLES Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?How Risky Is Cold OSB Wall Sheathing?Vapor Retarders and Vapor BarriersForget Vapor Diffusion — Stop the Air Leaks!Questions and Answers About Air BarriersQ&A Spotlight: Vapor Barriers Redux Vented Crawl Spaces and the Psychrometric Chart Are Not Friends Q&A: I have a problem with peeling paint Back in the 1930s, a rash of paint-peeling showed up across North America. One thing that most of these homes had in common was insulation in the walls. Painters put two and two together and decided that the problem was the insulation. According to building scientist Bill Rose, the painters surmised that the problem was happening because insulation “draws water,” and some refused to paint insulated houses.Now, I know what you’re thinking. Those painters didn’t want to paint insulated buildings because building science hadn’t been invented yet, and they thought the insulators were jumping the gun. Or was it that painters thought that stuffing the cavities with insulation was silly when all they needed was some good insulating paint? Then again, maybe I’m just jumping to conclusions here, as, it turns out, the proponents of insulated buildings did in their response to the painters’ revolt. Will the real culprit please stand up?Those early building scientists did some good research and advanced our knowledge of vapor diffusion and other building science topics. For example, Teesdale found that a material’s wetness is related to its temperature in what Rose calls the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness: Cold materials tend to be wet and warm materials tend to be dry.They misfired, however, on the cause of the peeling paint. The industry, led by Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, focused almost entirely on moisture diffusion and the need for vapor barriers. (These are also the guys who gave us vented crawl spaces, but that’s another story.) Browne is the one who got it right, way back in 1933. Yes, he mentioned diffusion as one mechanism for the wetting of walls and peeling of paint, but he also called out “poor carpenter work or faulty design,” as Rose quotes him.That is, the bigger problem was bad flashing details, which allowed rainwater to get into the building assemblies — and then stay there. Before insulation, it didn’t matter so much because of the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness. Uninsulated walls stayed warmer and thus dryer. With insulation in the walls, the cladding was colder and that meant it had less tolerance for bad flashing.Another factor more important than vapor diffusion is air leakage. Air moving through leaks in a wall can carry far more water vapor than diffusion allows. Dr. Joseph Lstiburek just wrote about this in his latest article at the Building Science Corp. website: “Air leakage was and is more important than vapor diffusion. Things have not changed.” It’s a great article about MacBeth and vapor barriers, and even though Joe is full of sound and fury, he’s not an idiot. Go read it.The moral of the story is not to jump to conclusions. We learned a lot about vapor diffusion, but our decades-long obsession with vapor barriers was counterproductive and hindered us from learning the more important lesson: It’s generally more important for building assemblies to be able to dry out than it is to prevent wetting by vapor diffusion.I’ll give the last word to Bill Rose on this topic: “Given the fact that a very small percentage of building problems (1 to 5% at most in the author’s experience) are associated with wetting by water vapor diffusion, the argument for enhanced drying potential becomes much stronger.”center_img On the first page of that chapter, Rose outlines how a set of moisture management practices developed in the period from 1937 to 1942, and that’s pretty much how we’ve treated buildings ever since. I’ll abbreviate his six bullet points to three (since I’m not going to delve into profile analysis in this article):Insulated buildings can have moisture problems because the exterior cladding and sheathing stay colder.Water vapor from the indoor air diffuses through the wall and settles in the cold cladding and sheathing.Vapor barriers are the solution to the problem.It’s a fascinating history, and Rose goes into the details of the different people who advanced the theory of diffusion and vapor barriers, the papers they wrote, and nearly two full pages on the 1952 condensation conference. The big names of the early building science research were F.L. Browne, Larry V. Teesdale, T.S. Rogers, and Frank Rowley. (For more information on Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, see Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?)One of the most amusing parts of the story is how the National Paint and Varnish Association got involved and declared “War Against Water.” Figure 2 below shows thecover of one of the booklets they published in the early 1950s. Written near the beginning of the Cold War, the booklet villainizes moisture much the same as McCarthy maligned communists. For example:They seem innocent enough, these three pools of moisture: the milk from the bottle, the steam from the shower, the vapor rising from the whistling tea kettle. But are they? Oh, no… they’re up to no good. Where do they go from here? Believe it or not, they have an engagement. At the “dewpoint” — if you please.Yeah, we can laugh now, but back then building professionals and homeowners alike were practicing their duck-and-cover drills at the slightest hint of water vapor! Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

3 Dec

Kashmir colleges to remain shut

first_imgStudents in the Kashmir Valley continued protests for the third consecutive day on Wednesday, forcing the authorities to close down all 46 colleges for two more days. “Teaching work in all colleges of the Kashmir division will remain suspended on April 20 and 21 as a precautionary measure,” said a spokesman of the Divisional Commissioner, Kashmir, Baseer Khan.Class work was stopped in all colleges and a few schools in Srinagar on Monday after students clashed with the security forces, leaving dozens injured. The trigger was the alleged police excesses on students of Government Degree College, Pulwama on April 13, which left over 50 students injured.In fresh protests on Wednesday, students took to the streets in north and central Kashmir. “This is a grim situation. We are worried,” said a spokesman of the State Education Ministry. The ministry officials claimed that the decision to close down schools and colleges “is taken by the district administration after assessing the ground situation”.This year’s academic session, like in 2016, when five months were lost to the street agitation, is again staring at a blank. Sources said the government was mulling multiple measures, including barring circulation of videos on social media platforms to stop unrest in colleges. Separatist leaders, Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Mohammad Yasin Malik, while strongly criticising the administration for “invading educational institutions and assaulting students,” called for solidarity protests on Friday.Meanwhile, the principal of Government Degree College, Pulwama, which is at the centre of the storm, was on Tuesday attached to the directorate office “till the inquiry is completed.”last_img read more