14 Jan

The Ellen “House of Cards” in These Elections: Why She Doesn’t Trust the Current…

first_imgBy Varney AnastersBackgroundThe Liberian General elections of 2017 is already parading many controversies. From crossing carpet to infightings, electoral activities have been filled with tension, as well as surprising, if not mystical, occurrences. However, the person dictating the current electoral climate is no other than the “Maradona,” or in modern day attribution, the “Cristiano Ronaldo” of Liberian politics, Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. The Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Varney Sherman long time feudPresident Sirleaf and Senator Varney Sherman were one-time real buddies. When Sherman graduated from the Louis Arthur Grimes School of Law in 1979, he joined the Maxwell and Maxwell Law Firm in 1980 as an associate, performing duties as a consulting attorney and a trial lawyer. After his graduation from Harvard Law School in 1982, he was given additional assignments and was entrusted to represent some of the firm’s biggest corporate clients; notably Citibank, Chase Manhattan Bank, Tradevco Bank among others. While at this firm, it was noticed that President Sirleaf had formed a special friendship with the head of the firm. The friendship between President Sirleaf and this head of the firm where Senator Sherman worked went on until the inception of the war in 1990, when all of them fled the country. After the war subsided, Cllr. Sherman went back to Liberia while the head of this Maxwell and Maxwell Law Firm stayed in the United States. The agreement was, Cllr. Sherman should revamp the law firm and report to him. After doing that for a while, Cllr. Sherman saw that as a disservice to himself, as he had to do all the work while this so-called boss was receiving the bulk of the remittances. He then decided to establish his own firm. After the Sherman and Sherman Law Firm was founded, Cllr. Sherman took all the valuable clients from the Maxwell and Maxwell Law Firm over with him. This caused some bad blood between Sherman and his former boss who President Sirleaf was close to, thereby starting a rift between Sirleaf and Sherman. It is understood that President Sirleaf was being aided by Sherman’s ex-boss while in exile. After Sherman stopped the cash flow, it ultimately triggered disenchantment and heated exchanges between Ellen and Varney. For years, Ellen and Varney could not see eye-to-eye, and after the elections of 2005, he somehow started reversing his stiffness. After peace talks, both parties decided to reconcile, and in 2011, they formed a coalition which, in earnest, Ellen was only using to gain a second term win. Originally, Varney Sherman was promised a vice presidential slot after Ellen ended her term, when Joseph Boakai would have become the candidate on the party ticket. However, the rift between them reignited during the 2014 midterm elections when the Unity Party refused to support the senatorial candidacy of Robert Sirleaf and the Vice President subsequently campaigned for Sherman in Cape Mount. This led to President Sirleaf empowering the former President of NOCAL, Dr. Foday Kromah, who was also a candidate in Grand Cape Mount county race, to file a lawsuit about the elections result, which led to Sherman missing out on the Senate Pro-Temp position. Fast forward to 2016, Vice President Boakai’s top pick for a vice standard bearer was Senator Varney Sherman. Since President Sirleaf still harbored some resentment against Senator Sherman, she ignited the Global Witness investigation. Tyler was included in that investigation because he would have ultimately become chair of the party, and a Sherman-Tyler clique would not have owed any loyalty to Ellen after her term and could have had real influence on Vice President Boakai (Madam President knew that Sherman and Tyler would have been hard to control). Although Tyler had resigned from the Unity Party and founded the LPDP, he had plans to join the Unity Party in a coalition, which was going to give him some leverage and chairmanship of the party. But Ellen thwarted all those plans with the Global Witness report and setting up of a task force which eventually sent both Sherman and Tyler to court. The 2017 Ellen play: the Liberty Party and Coalition for Democratic Change scenarios After the dismantling of the Sherman and Tyler forces, and with the election of Wilmot Paye as chairman of the UP, Madam President still saw that as a threat to her influence; most of Sherman’s young intellectuals he brought over during the merger in 2011 have become the most powerful and influential people in the Unity Party. In addition, Sherman and Vice President Boakai have a strong relationship, therefore, Madam President started having reservations about Boakai’s candidacy. It was with this thought that she turned her focus toward the Liberty Party. Cllr. Fonati Koffa, a former chairman of Liberty Party, started working on a deal between the President and the party for her support, and the party’s protection of her family when they win. This was how Koffa was appointed as head of the special task force on the Global Witness saga. The earlier negotiations started with a proposal to Vice President Boakai for a Boakai-Brumskine ticket by Madam Sirleaf, which the VP rejected. After that rejection, Madam Sirleaf decided to boost the morale of the Liberty Party by funneling money through the task force headed by Cllr. Koffa. Because she did not want this money to be detected, the task force budget was embedded into the National Security Agency’s budget (the NSA can’t be audited). Three payments of US$250,000 each were made through the NSA over the last three months with the intent of the task force’s operational budget. It was not: it was a means used to clean the money for onward transfer to the Liberty Party by Fonati Koffa. This was how the Liberty Party brought in all those vehicles and bikes, with Musa Bility fronting like he made the arrangements for them. Actually, it was taxpayers’ money. During this period of Madam President’s support to the Liberty Party, officials of the Unity Party started to become a bit jittery. Tension was visible between the Madam President and Vice President Boakai, which eventually led to a peace talk between the two by Bishop David Daniels of the AME Church of Liberia. During that meeting, Madam President wanted assurance from Vice President Boakai for the protection of her family and to eliminate the Country and Congau rhetoric. Vice President Boakai could not commit to the protection of her family, as his stance was if they were found culpable of any crime, they will be prosecuted. But he promised to intervene with the party to calm the Country and Congau rhetoric. Since that meeting did not yield the fruit she wanted, Madam President then turned her attention to the Liberty Party once and for all. However, after three surveys were done by Nigerian, UK and an Israeli firms, the President was told that Liberty Party does not have a chance of winning these elections. She was advised that if she wants to partner with any opposition, the Coalition for Democratic Change of George Weah could be the best shot. At a meeting at the American Embassy some time ago, the President was informed by the Americans that they want a free and fair elections, void of any malpractice. This put the president in a position of eliminating any thought of influencing the results in favor of Liberty Party for a second-round spot. Being the ‘smartest’ Liberian politician she is, President Sirleaf then reached out to the CDC. Madam President’s outreach to the Coalition for Democratic Change is for two reasons: protection of her family from prosecution and Weah’s support to Robert Sirleaf during the special elections for Montserrado for his vacant seat if Weah wins. Since the provisional acceptance of her outreach by Senator Weah and co., the President has instructed all her trusted confidants to choose between the Unity Party and her. This led to the resignation of Eugene Nagbe as Secretary General of the Party and Gbezongar Findley from the party (Nagbe will officially resign from Unity Party soon). More resignations are expected in coming weeks. In addition, it is being reported that Robert Sirleaf has promised Gazprom, a Russian Oil Company, some of Liberia’s oil wells with the election of Weah. This has prompted Gazprom to make some significant commitment to the campaign of Weah through the Sirleafs. The CDC is expected to benefit from choppers and some good sum of money from this arrangement. Conclusion Although they are saving face, the Unity Party is in serious disarray. The party is divided into two factions: the President Sirleaf faction on one hand, and the Vice President Boakai and Varney Sherman faction on the other hand. If the marriage between the Sirleafs and the CDC becomes really successful, we will see unusual defections from the party in the coming weeks. While it is true that politics is about interest, I would like to clearly state in my impartial and independent opinion that the treatment of the Vice President by President Sirleaf is very bad. This was the party that elected you to two terms. In the meantime, the Coalition for Democratic Change needs to be careful with this marriage with Ellen. Madam President is a political strategist and should not be trusted in a wholesome manner. While Madam President might not influence the election by manipulating the results, she might just influence it by manipulating parties. In our Liberian terms, “Ellen is putting political susu hand all over.” As the Liberian “House of Cards” series premieres, we are on the sidelines watching. Good luck to all parties involved. 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20 Dec

Ousted Coliseum executive’s spending raises eyebrows

first_imgOAKLAND — Ousted Coliseum Authority Executive Director Scott McKibben is facing criminal charges of violating state conflict-of-interest laws, but his spending habits as head of the special agency raise new questions about how he did his job.Bills show McKibben charged the public agency for two NBA Finals tickets given to lawyers, traveled out of state without board approval to meet with an executive he now works for, and authorized a $25,000 payment to the son of former state Sen. Don Perata, …last_img read more

18 Dec

World Coaches Academy at Wits

first_imgThe University of the Wiwatersrand has aproud tradition of football, and is home tothe “Clever Boys”, the Bidvest Wits FCPremier Soccer League team.(Image: Wikipedia)MEDIA CONTACTS• Shirona Patel, communications managerUniversity of the Witwatersrand+27 11 717 1019Shironal.Patel@wits.ac.zaRELATED ARTICLES• From Football to Fly the Flag• Top marks for SA’s World Cup• Out of Africa, something new• A legacy of harmony and pride• World Cup: 97% of SA ‘more proud’ Thato MokhouSouth Africa’s Johannesburg-based University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) and the Netherlands government have joined forces to create a World Cup legacy programme to develop social and football skills in the southern African region.Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbalbond (KNVB), the Dutch football association, saw the need to revolutionise school-level football development in South Africa and decided to make Wits the home of the first World Coaches Academy in the country.As part of conditions set for the Netherlands team to use the university as a training camp for its 2010 Fifa World Cup preparations, the team was required to present a legacy project that would run long after the tournament. The team formulated two projects. The first was to extend the World Coaches Academy to southern Africa, and the second the laying of a brand new astro pitch to develop Wits’ youth programme in Johannesburg’s inner-city area of Hillbrow.“The Wits World Coaches Academy will see 1 000 coaches in the southern African region trained as life-skills mentors and coaches,” says Yunus Ballim, the Wits vice-chancellor in charge of academic affairs.“The academy is a well-established programme in Holland and it seeks to improve the relationship between football and social development. The World Coaches programme launching at Wits has a new dimension and that is the life-skills element.”The university has a proud tradition of football, and is home to the “Clever Boys”, the Bidvest Wits FC Premier Soccer League team.Wits academics Ruksana Osman, Norman Duncan, Eric Worby and Demitri Constantinou have partnered with colleagues from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands to develop a curriculum for the life-skills component of the initiative.Ballim will meet with the deputy vice-chancellors from the Universities of Zambia and Mozambique this week to get their institutions involved in the project.“Our intention is to focus on soccer as social development rather than develop players who will play for premier leagues around the world,” Ballim says. “And that is why we are going to try and focus on teachers in rural and township schools who will become the coaches trained by the World Coaches programme.”The primary aim is to see teachers going back to their schools to develop the lifeskills of their students. The skills taught will include how to deal with crime, poverty and social power relations, and how to take advantage of opportunities for learning.“If we can reach 1 000 coaches in four years, I think we can make an enormous contribution,” Ballim says. Wits will be the academic coordinator and base for the training programme. There will, however, be delivery sites that will reach out to the 1 000 people throughout the southern African region.KNVB have proposed to lay an astro pitch at Sturrock park stadium where the coaches from Wits will be trained and will also improve facilities where the lifeskills lectures will take place.“Sturrock Park will become a soccer-knowledge precinct. In other words, it will be about the knowledge about soccer and also knowledge about the role of soccer in community development,” says Ballim.The programme will also be used as a research, learning and teaching structure, and Ballim encourages Wits students to take part in the initiative.last_img read more

18 Dec

SA’s mortality rate continues decline

first_img2 December 2011 Source: BuaNews The annual report, produced jointly by the departments of health and home affairs, found that the decline in the country’s number of deaths was for both men and women, with female deaths declining at a higher rate than men. TB remains most common cause Accidental injury Releasing the findings of the Mortality and Causes of Death in South Africa report for 2009, Stats SA said a total of 572 673 deaths occurred in 2009, and were registered with the Department of Home Affairs. “The highest percentage of deaths due to non-natural causes was observed for those aged 15 – 19 when compared to other age groups; and the number of deaths was generally higher for males of all age groups compared to females. In 2009, tuberculosis continued to be the most commonly mentioned cause of death on death notification forms, as well as the leading underlying natural cause of death in the country. However, the number of deaths due to this cause has been decreasing since 2007. “Also, compared to other provinces, the province of death occurrence that had the highest proportion of non-natural deaths was the Western Cape,” the report stated. “Information on causes of death indicated that the majority of deaths resulted from natural causes, particularly certain infectious and parasitic diseases,” noted the report.center_img Influenza and pneumonia were the second leading cause of death, followed by intestinal infectious diseases, other forms of heart disease and cerebro-vascular diseases. This was observed in men and women. “The total number of deaths processed by Stats SA decreased by 1.5% between 2007 and 2008, and by 3.8% between 2008 and 2009,” the agency said. HIV overall was the seventh leading cause of death, accounting for 3.1% of all deaths in 2009. For men and women, HIV was the sixth and eighth leading cause of death respectively. “The majority of deaths occurred among the black African population group. Most deaths occurred at healthcare facilities, although about 30% still occurred at home. South Africa’s mortality rate continued to decline in 2009, with tuberculosis (TB) being the most commonly mentioned cause of death on certificates, says Statistics South Africa (Stats SA). Children under 15 years died mainly from intestinal infectious diseases, while those aged between 15 and 64 years died mostly from tuberculosis. Those aged 65 years and older died mostly from cerebro-vascular diseases. “The results indicate that mortality continues to decline in the country as observed from 2007 in both data processed by Stats SA and the number of deaths recorded in the national population register.” A proportion of 8.6% of all deaths were due to non-natural causes of death, with the majority of these due to other external causes of accidental injury.last_img read more

18 Dec

Transcript: 14th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture by Bill Gates

first_imgIn his address for the 14th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture, Bill Gates spoke under the broad theme of “living together”. He touched on a range of topics, from health to education and governance. Missed it? Read and watch his speech. American philanthropist Bill Gates delivers the 14th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture on 17 July 2016, the eve of International Nelson Mandela Day. He is pictured with Prof Njabulo Ndebele and Mandela’s widow, Graça Machel. (Image: Nelson Mandela Foundation)Bill Gates delivers 2016 Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture at University of Pretoria.Good evening ladies and gentlemen, Graça Machel, Professor Ndebele, vice-chancellor De la Rey, members of the Mamelodi families, friends and dignitaries. It is a great honour to have the opportunity to speak today.The theme of this year’s Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture is “living together.” This is fitting, because in many ways, “living together” was also the theme of Nelson Mandela’s life. The system he fought against was based on the opposite idea – that people should be kept apart, that our superficial differences are more important than our common humanity.Today, South Africans are still striving to “live together” in the fullest sense, but you are so much closer to that ideal because Nelson Mandela and so many others believed in the promise of one South Africa.I was nine years old when Nelson Mandela went to Robben Island. As a boy, I learned about him in school. I remember seeing reports about the anti-apartheid movement on the evening news.The first time I spoke with him was in 1994, when he called to ask me to help fund South Africa’s election. I was running Microsoft and thinking about software most of my waking hours. But I admired Nelson Mandela very much, I knew the election was historic, and I did what I could to help.I had been to Africa for the first time just the year before – in 1993 – when Melinda and I travelled in East Africa on vacation. The landscape was beautiful. The people were friendly. But the poverty, which we were seeing for the first time, disturbed us.It also energised us.Obviously, we knew parts of Africa were very poor, but being on the continent turned what had been an abstraction into an injustice we could not ignore. Melinda and I had always known we’d give our wealth to philanthropy – eventually. But when we were confronted with such glaring inequity, we started thinking about how to take action sooner.This sense of urgency was spurred on by another trip, in 1997, when I travelled to Johannesburg for the first time, as a representative of Microsoft.I spent most of the time in business meetings. But one day, I went to a community centre in Soweto where Microsoft had donated computers. My visit to Soweto – which was quite different then than it is now – taught me how much I had to learn about the world outside the comfortable bubble I’d lived in all my life.As I walked into the community centre, I noticed there wasn’t any electrical power. To keep the computers on, they had rigged up an extension cord that connected to a diesel generator outside. I knew that the minute I left, the generator would get moved to a more urgent task.As I read my prepared remarks, about the importance of closing the technology gap, I knew I was missing the point in some way. Computers could help people do some important things, and in fact they have revolutionised life on the continent in many ways. But computers couldn’t cure disease or feed children. And if they couldn’t be turned on, they couldn’t do anything at all.Soon after that, we started our foundation – because the costs of waiting had become clear. Our work is based on the belief that every person – no matter where they live – should have the opportunity to lead a healthy and productive life. We have spent the past 15 years learning about the issues and looking for the leverage points where we can do the most to help people seize that opportunity.It was when I started coming to Africa regularly for the foundation that I came to know Nelson Mandela personally. Aids was one of the first issues our foundation worked on, and Nelson Mandela was both an adviser and an inspiration.What we talked about most was the stigma around Aids. So I remember 2005 very clearly, when his son died of Aids.Rather than stay silent about the cause of his son’s death, Nelson Mandela announced it publicly, because he knew that stopping the disease required breaking down the walls of fear and shame that surrounded it.Watch his address:Progress and challengesIt is important to recall Nelson Mandela’s legacy – and I am grateful for the opportunity to do so. But Nelson Mandela was concerned with the future. He believed people could make the future better than the past. And so that’s the topic I’d like to discuss for the remainder of my time here today.What can South Africa be, what can Africa be, what can the world be – and what must we do to make it that way?The Millennium Development Goals adopted by the United Nations in 2000 laid a foundation that enabled Africa to achieve extraordinary progress over the last 15 years. And the Sustainable Development Goals that recently replaced them set even more ambitious targets for creating the better world we all want.When I talk about progress, I always start with child survival, because whether children are living or dying is such a basic indicator of a society’s success. Since 1990, child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa has been reduced by 54%. That translates to 1 million fewer children who died last year compared to 25 years ago. Ten African countries achieved the MDG target of reducing child mortality by two-thirds.Meanwhile, the incidence of poverty and malnutrition is down. And, though economic growth has slowed in the past few years, it has been very robust in many countries for more than a decade.This is very real progress, but the Africa Rising narrative doesn’t tell the whole story about life on the continent.First, the progress has been uneven. You know this very well here in South Africa. In last year’s Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture, the French economist Thomas Piketty pointed out that income inequality in South Africa is, quote: “higher than pretty much anywhere else in the world”.In general, African countries tend to have higher rates of inequality than countries on other continents. And despite healthy average GDP growth in the region, many countries have not shared in it. Gross inequalities exist both within countries and between countries. Until progress belongs to all people, everywhere, the real promise of living together will remain elusive.Second, even with the great progress Africa has made, it still lags behind the rest of the world in almost every indicator. In sub-Saharan Africa, 1 in 12 children will die before they turn 5. This is a vast improvement compared to 25 years ago, but African children are still 12 times more likely to die than the average child in a wealthy country. And because rates of poverty and malnutrition aren’t shrinking as fast as the population is growing, the total number of people who are poor or malnourished has actually gone up since 1990.Finally, the progress is fragile. The continent’s two largest economies, here in South Africa and in Nigeria, are facing serious economic turmoil. And new threats require attention. The Ebola crisis pointed out weaknesses in many national health systems. The effects of climate change are already being felt among farmers in many countries.In short, to meet the goals of the SDGs, Africa needs to do more, do it faster, and make sure everybody benefits.It won’t be easy, but I believe it can be done.The successes and failures of the past 15 years have generated exemplars and lessons that we can learn from. Phenomenal advances in science and technology are constantly expanding the range of solutions available to solve development challenges. And then there is the ingenuity of the African people.YouthOne topic that Nelson Mandela came back to over and over again was the power of youth. He knew what he was talking about, because he started his career as a member of the African National Congress Youth League when he was still in his 20s.Later on, he understood that highlighting the oppression of young people was a powerful way to explain why things must change. There is a universal appeal to the conviction that youth deserve a chance.I agree with Mandela about young people, and that is one reason I am optimistic about the future of this continent. Demographically, Africa is the world’s youngest continent, and its youth can be the source of a special dynamism.In the next 35 years, 2 billion babies will be born in Africa. By 2050, 40% of the world’s children will live on this continent.Economists talk about the demographic dividend. When you have more people of working age, and fewer dependents for them to take care of, you can generate phenomenal economic growth. Rapid economic growth in East Asia in the 1970s and 1980s was partly driven by the large number of young people moving into their work force.But for me, the most important thing about young people is the way their minds work. Young people are better than old people at driving innovation, because they are not locked in by the limits of the past.When I started Microsoft in 1975 – at the age of 19 – computer science was a young field. We didn’t feel beholden to old notions about what computers could or should do. We dreamed about the next big thing, and we scoured the world around us for the ideas and the tools that would help us create it.But it wasn’t just at Microsoft. Steve Jobs was 21 when he started Apple. Mark Zuckerberg was only 19 when he created Facebook.The African entrepreneurs driving start-up booms in the Silicon savannahs from Johannesburg and Cape Town to Lagos and Nairobi are just as young – in chronological age, but also in outlook. The thousands of businesses they’re creating are already changing daily life across the continent.In a few days, I’ll be meeting with some of these young innovators. People like the 21-year-old who founded Kenya’s first software coding school to provide other young people with computer programming skills. And like the 23-year-old social entrepreneur here in South Africa who manufactures schoolbags from recycled plastic shopping bags. Besides being highly visible to protect children as they’re walking to school, these school bags sport a small solar panel that charges a lantern during the journey to and from school – providing illumination so students can study when they get home.The real returns will come if we can multiply this talent for innovation by the whole of Africa’s growing youth population. That depends on whether Africa’s young people – all of Africa’s young people – are given the opportunity to thrive.Nelson Mandela said: “Poverty is not natural. It is man-made and it can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings.”We are the human beings who must take action, and we have to decide now, because this unique moment won’t last forever. We must clear away the obstacles that are standing in young people’s way so they can seize all of their potential.If young people are sick and malnourished, their bodies and their brains will never fully develop. If they are not educated well, their minds will lie dormant. If they do not have access to economic opportunities, they will not be able to achieve their goals.But if we invest in the right things – if we make sure the basic needs of Africa’s young people are taken care of – then they will have the physical, cognitive, and emotional resources they need to change the future. Life on this continent will improve faster than it ever has. And the inequities that have kept people apart will be erased by broad-based progress that is the very meaning of the words: “living together”.Health and nutritionWhen Melinda and I started our foundation 15 years ago, we asked ourselves: What are the areas of greatest opportunity? It was clear to us that investing in health was at the top of the list. When people aren’t healthy, they can’t turn their attention to other priorities. But when health improves, life improves by every measure.Over the last 15 years, our foundation has invested more than $9-billion (about R128-billion) in Africa – and we are committed to keep on investing to help Africa. In the next five years, we will invest another $5-billion (about R71-billion).We’ve put a lot of this money into discovering and developing new and better vaccines and drugs to help prevent and treat the diseases of poverty. We’ve also invested in global partnerships that work closely with countries across the continent to get these solutions to the people who need them most.We’ve been fortunate to work with amazing partners and, together, we have seen some incredible progress.The entire continent of Africa has been polio-free for two years, which puts us within reach of wiping polio from the face of the Earth… forever.The newest vaccines that protect children from two of the most devastating diseases – pneumonia and severe diarrhoea – are reaching children across Africa at the same time they’re available for children in wealthier countries.Countries that invest in strong, community-based primary health care systems – like Malawi, Ethiopia, and Rwanda – are making great progress reducing child mortality.Malaria infections and deaths are down significantly thanks to better treatment and prevention tools.And efforts like the Ouagadougou Partnership in West Africa are helping millions of women get access to contraceptives, which can make it easier for them to care for their families.Aids is another area where there’s been good progress – though it’s a more complicated story and there are big challenges ahead.In a few days, I’ll be speaking at the International Aids conference in Durban. When the global Aids community last met there in 2000, only a few thousand Africans were receiving antiretroviral drugs. Today, more than 12 million Africans are on treatment – more than a quarter of them living here in South Africa.But the rate of new infections remains high. In sub-Saharan Africa, more than 2 000 young people under the age of 24 are newly infected every single day. The number of young people dying from HIV has increased fourfold since 1990.There are other challenges. Almost half of the people living with HIV are undiagnosed. Millions more aren’t being treated. And millions of people who are receiving treatment aren’t able to stay on it.Add to this the high rates of tuberculosis among people living with HIV, including here in South Africa where TB/HIV co-infection continues to wage a devastating toll.So we need more creative ways to make testing and treatment accessible and easier to use.We need to get much more out of existing prevention methods like condoms, voluntary medical male circumcision, and oral anti-HIV medicine.And we’re going to need new and better prevention solutions – like an effective vaccine and medicines that people are more likely to use consistently.If we fail to act, all the hard-earned gains made in HIV in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 15 years could be reversed, particularly given that Africa’s young people are entering the age when they are most at risk of HIV.Nutrition is another critical area of focus for Africa. Nearly one third of the continent’s children suffer from malnutrition that stunts their growth and development and robs them of their physical and cognitive potential. Millions more suffer from micronutrient deficiencies. These are impacts that last a lifetime and impact whole generations of Africa’s youth.African Development Bank president Akin Adesina put it best when he said recently that the greatest contributor to Africa’s economic growth is not physical infrastructure, but “grey matter infrastructure” – people’s brainpower. The best way to build that infrastructure is with proper nutrition.Candidly, it’s hard to imagine a better future for Africa’s youth without tackling this problem.While eliminating malnutrition is a complex challenge, there is a lot we already know about how to ensure that every child gets a healthy start in life.We know that mothers and infants need good nutrition for healthy growth and brain development, and that breastfeeding protects children from life-threatening diseases like pneumonia and diarrhoea.We also know that certain vitamins and minerals are essential for children and for women of reproductive age.The good news is we have a growing suite of cost-effective interventions – things like cooking oil, sugar fortified with Vitamin A and sugar and flour enriched with iron, zinc, and B vitamins.One of the most exciting advances is the breeding of staple crops so they are more nutritious. For example, when adolescents eat high-iron pearl millet, their likelihood of iron deficiency decreases six-fold. And just half a cup of biofortified orange sweet potato is all it takes to meet a child’s daily vitamin A needs.The human and economic toll of micronutrient deficiency is huge, but the costs of fighting it are not.Recent estimates in Nigeria and Uganda indicate that every dollar invested to reduce stunting will return $17 in greater earning capacity in the workplace.EducationWhen children’s bodies and brains are healthy, the next step is an education that helps them develop the knowledge and skills to become productive contributors to society.Improving education is incredibly hard. I have learned this first hand through our foundation’s efforts to create better learning outcomes for primary, secondary, and university students in the US. But this hard work is incredibly important. A good education is the best lever we have for giving every young person a chance to make the most of their lives.In Africa, as in the US, we need new thinking and new educational tools to make sure that a high-quality education is available to every single child.In Uganda, young innovators at an NGO called Educate! are helping high schools prepare young people for the workplace by teaching students how to start their own business.And with the high level of mobile phone penetration in Africa, technology using mobile phones connected to the internet have the potential to help students build foundational skills while giving teachers better support and feedback.Globally, the education technology sector is innovating and growing rapidly, and it’s exciting to see new tools and learning models emerging to meet the needs of educators and students that are not currently being met by existing systems.At the post-secondary level, we not only need to broaden access, we also have to ensure that governments are investing in high-quality public universities to launch the next generation of scientists, entrepreneurs, educators, and government leaders.South Africa is blessed with some of the best universities in Africa, universities that our foundation relies on as partners in important health and agricultural research. Maintaining the quality of this country’s higher education system while expanding access to more students will not be easy. But it is critical to South Africa’s future.Other countries in the region will do well to follow South Africa’s example and provide the highest level university education to the largest number of qualified students.ProductivityHealthy, educated young people are eager to make their way in the world. But African’s youth must have the economic opportunities to channel their energy and their ideas into progress.One way to create economic opportunity is to turn agriculture, which still employs more than half the people on the continent, from a struggle for survival into a thriving business.Right now, most African smallholders suffer from an almost total lack of innovation. They plant unproductive seeds in poor soils in order to produce just enough to feed their family. With climate change leading to more severe weather, doing more of the same is going to bring even more meagre harvests.The key to breaking this cycle is a series of innovations at every step along the way from farm to market.First, African farmers need better tools to avoid disasters and grow a surplus – things like seeds that can tolerate droughts, floods, pests, and disease, affordable fertiliser that includes the right mix of nutrients to replenish the soil, and easy-to-administer livestock vaccines that can prevent flocks and herds from being wiped out.Second, farmers need to be connected to markets where they can buy these inputs, sell their surplus, and earn a profit they can invest not only in their family’s basic needs but also back into the farm.This, in turn, will provide employment opportunities both on and off the farm as more prosperous farmers begin to support a range of local agribusinesses like seed dealers, trucking companies, and processing plants.I recently met with a group of young crop breeders, one from Ethiopia, one from Kenya, one from Nigeria, and one from Uganda. I may be a little unusual in this regard, but I love talking about the science of plant productivity. In this case, they were all doing cutting-edge work on cassava, a staple crop that provides more than one-third of the calories in the average African diet.Some were working to improve its nutritional content. Others were trying to breed a variety that can resist both of the devastating diseases that threaten to wipe out farmers’ entire crop.Our foundation is also working with a young computer scientist from Makerere University who designed a mobile phone app that lets farmers upload a photo of their cassava plants and find out immediately whether it’s infected or not.These are the innovators who can drive an agricultural transformation across the continent – if they have the support they need. For many decades, agriculture has suffered from dramatic underinvestment. Many governments didn’t see the link between their farmers and economic growth.Now, however, this misconception is gone – and through the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program, countries have a framework for transforming agriculture. The investment needs to follow, so that young Africans have the means to create the thriving agriculture they envision.With Africa’s small farms as a base, the next step toward economic opportunity is to promote job creation in other sectors. Doing this will require significant investments in infrastructure, including energy.Seven in 10 Africans currently lack access to power, which makes it harder to do everything. Harder to get health care in a dark clinic. Harder to learn in school when it’s boiling hot. Harder to be productive when you can’t use labour saving machinery.Unfortunately, a shortage of power – like South Africa is currently experiencing – is also a massive drag on economic growth. Businesses will not invest in places where they can’t operate efficiently.A recent report projected that more than 500 million Africans won’t have electricity in 2040. That number needs to go down.In the long run, what Africa needs is what the whole world needs: a breakthrough energy miracle that provides cheap, clean energy for everyone. I have spent much of the past two years on this issue because it’s hard to think of anything more important. I am involved with a group of businesspeople who are collaborating with almost two dozen governments, mostly in rich countries, on a project called Mission Innovation. The goal is for these governments to double their energy R&D spending in the next five years.I get angry when I see that Africa is suffering the worst effects of climate change although Africans had almost nothing to do with causing it. The countries leading Mission Innovation need to create energy breakthroughs that are applicable globally – and they need to do so urgently.No matter how accelerated the R&D agenda is, though, we cannot wait for tomorrow’s energy breakthrough. Africa needs power now, and there are ways to meet that need now.In East Africa especially, governments should invest in hydro and geothermal sources of energy, which are both reliable and renewable, as soon as possible. There has been a lot of experimentation with small-scale renewable energy, including micro solar. This approach can provide individuals with some electricity for basic purposes, but it’s not going to be the solution for the continent as a whole.One priority for governments is to get much tougher about managing their electrical grids. This means refurbishing power plants, making sure people are paying their bills, and doing the technical work to stem electricity losses so that the grid is operating as close to 100% as possible.Once the power utilities can prove they are economically viable, it will be easier to attract investors who can help fund the necessary improvements.Using the resources available now, we can provide power to many of the 500 million Africans projected to be without it 25 years from now. With breakthrough innovation, we can chart the path to zero.GovernanceAll of these things – advances in health, in education, in agricultural productivity, in energy – won’t happen on their own. They can only happen in the context of governments that function well enough to enable them.It’s great to see initiatives like Mo Ibrahim’s annual index of African governance, which looks objectively at multiple measures of government performance in each country on the continent. Citizens in other regions would be well served by this kind of comprehensive effort to spotlight and spread effective governance.A lot can be accomplished by focusing on fiscal governance and accountability. Here in South Africa, the government gets strong marks for the budget information it provides to the public. The International Budget Partnership, an independent monitoring organisation, also ranks South Africa highly for its oversight of government spending.But sometimes, it takes individual citizens to lead the way. Thirty-year-old Oluseun Onigbinde gave up a career in banking five years ago to devote himself fulltime to pulling back the curtain on Nigeria’s federal expenditures.Savvy in the use of data and social media, Onigbinde founded BudgIT Nigeria, a website that provides facts and figures the average Nigerian can understand. Onigbinde is no doubt a thorn in the side of some of Nigeria’s elite. To me, he is an example of what one person can do to make a difference.The machinery of government is still relatively new in many African countries, and it’s important that as the institutions of governance mature, they don’t just try to mimic how things are done in developed countries.One of the most exciting prospects is the role African governments can play in accelerating the use of digital technology to leapfrog the traditional models and costly infrastructure associated with banking and delivery of government services.Because so many people in developing countries have mobile phones, tens of millions of people are storing money digitally on their phones and using their phones to make purchases, as if they were debit cards.But mobile money services like M-PESA in Kenya don’t just give people a better way to move money around. They give people a place to save cash to fund the start-up of a microenterprise or pay a child’s school exam fee. They create informal insurance networks of family and friends who can help with unexpected financial shocks like a crop failure or a serious medical illness. And they increase the profitability of small businesses through lower transaction costs, easier ordering of products and supplies, and greater security of financial assets.A digital financial connection can also help governments deliver services more efficiently. I’ve seen studies from India showing the government could save $22-billion a year by connecting households to a digital payment system and automating all government payments. The early evidence suggests that similar programmes in Africa can yield the same benefits – while increasing the effectiveness of government services.For example, recent research in Uganda showed that providing people with digital cash transfers rather than direct food subsidies not only saved the cost of physical delivery, it also improved nutrition because the money gave recipients the ability to purchase a greater diversity of foods and to space out meals as needed.Governments can accelerate this digital transformation by implementing policies that encourage commercial investment, innovation, and healthy competition, by building the shared infrastructure needed to enable digital financial services to flourish, and finally by using this technology to digitise payments and improve delivery of services to citizens.Countries like Kenya, Tanzania, and Nigeria are already investing in the building blocks of this new digital financial platform, and they’re likely to see positive economic returns that more than offset the cost.ConclusionIf there is one thing I’m sure of, it is this: Africa can achieve the future it aspires to.That future depends on the people of Africa working together, across economic and social strata and across national borders, to lay a foundation so that Africa’s young people have the opportunities they deserve.Recently, I met with some students at Addis Ababa University. I started by asking them the casual questions college students tend to get asked in America: “What do you want to do after you graduate?” “What fields are you thinking about going into?”They looked at me like I was crazy to be asking questions like that. They knew exactly what they were going to do. Their parents had sacrificed for 20 years so they could go to school. They weren’t weighing their options. They had come to university to get specific training, and they were eager to get on with it so that they could help Ethiopia become a prosperous country.They saw themselves as members of a community with needs, and they were going to dedicate themselves to serving that community by meeting those needs. I see that sense of purpose whenever I come to Africa, and especially whenever I talk to young Africans. I think this is unique. I meet with students all over the world, and they aren’t all so committed to giving back.But students here believe in themselves, and they believe in their countries and the future of the continent.The priority now is to make sure they have the opportunity to turn those beliefs into action. Because young people with this sense of purpose can make the difference between stagnation and more and faster progress.Nelson Mandela said: “Young people are capable, when aroused, of bringing down the towers of oppression and raising the banners of freedom.”But our duty is not merely to arouse; our duty is to invest in young people, to put in place the basic building blocks so that they can build the future. And our duty is to do it now, because the innovations of tomorrow depend on the opportunities available to children today.It’s clear to everyone how big and complicated the challenges are. But it’s just as clear that people with bravery, energy, intellect, passion, and stamina can face big, complicated challenges and overcome them. There is so much more work to be done to create a future in which we can all live together. But there are also so many people who are eager to get to work.Let’s do everything within our power right now to help them build the future that Nelson Mandela dreamed of – and the future that we will achieve together.Thank you.© 2016 Nelson Mandela Foundation.last_img read more

16 Dec

The History of Peeling Paint, Insulation, and Vapor Barriers

first_imgInsulation and the early building science researchersI’ve mentioned Bill Rose’s excellent book, Water in Buildings, in this space before, and it’s a wonderful resource. Chapter 3, “Water and Building Materials,” lays out the U.S. history of building science research spurred by the paint-peeling episode of those early adopters of insulation. RELATED ARTICLES Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?How Risky Is Cold OSB Wall Sheathing?Vapor Retarders and Vapor BarriersForget Vapor Diffusion — Stop the Air Leaks!Questions and Answers About Air BarriersQ&A Spotlight: Vapor Barriers Redux Vented Crawl Spaces and the Psychrometric Chart Are Not Friends Q&A: I have a problem with peeling paint Back in the 1930s, a rash of paint-peeling showed up across North America. One thing that most of these homes had in common was insulation in the walls. Painters put two and two together and decided that the problem was the insulation. According to building scientist Bill Rose, the painters surmised that the problem was happening because insulation “draws water,” and some refused to paint insulated houses.Now, I know what you’re thinking. Those painters didn’t want to paint insulated buildings because building science hadn’t been invented yet, and they thought the insulators were jumping the gun. Or was it that painters thought that stuffing the cavities with insulation was silly when all they needed was some good insulating paint? Then again, maybe I’m just jumping to conclusions here, as, it turns out, the proponents of insulated buildings did in their response to the painters’ revolt. Will the real culprit please stand up?Those early building scientists did some good research and advanced our knowledge of vapor diffusion and other building science topics. For example, Teesdale found that a material’s wetness is related to its temperature in what Rose calls the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness: Cold materials tend to be wet and warm materials tend to be dry.They misfired, however, on the cause of the peeling paint. The industry, led by Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, focused almost entirely on moisture diffusion and the need for vapor barriers. (These are also the guys who gave us vented crawl spaces, but that’s another story.) Browne is the one who got it right, way back in 1933. Yes, he mentioned diffusion as one mechanism for the wetting of walls and peeling of paint, but he also called out “poor carpenter work or faulty design,” as Rose quotes him.That is, the bigger problem was bad flashing details, which allowed rainwater to get into the building assemblies — and then stay there. Before insulation, it didn’t matter so much because of the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness. Uninsulated walls stayed warmer and thus dryer. With insulation in the walls, the cladding was colder and that meant it had less tolerance for bad flashing.Another factor more important than vapor diffusion is air leakage. Air moving through leaks in a wall can carry far more water vapor than diffusion allows. Dr. Joseph Lstiburek just wrote about this in his latest article at the Building Science Corp. website: “Air leakage was and is more important than vapor diffusion. Things have not changed.” It’s a great article about MacBeth and vapor barriers, and even though Joe is full of sound and fury, he’s not an idiot. Go read it.The moral of the story is not to jump to conclusions. We learned a lot about vapor diffusion, but our decades-long obsession with vapor barriers was counterproductive and hindered us from learning the more important lesson: It’s generally more important for building assemblies to be able to dry out than it is to prevent wetting by vapor diffusion.I’ll give the last word to Bill Rose on this topic: “Given the fact that a very small percentage of building problems (1 to 5% at most in the author’s experience) are associated with wetting by water vapor diffusion, the argument for enhanced drying potential becomes much stronger.”center_img On the first page of that chapter, Rose outlines how a set of moisture management practices developed in the period from 1937 to 1942, and that’s pretty much how we’ve treated buildings ever since. I’ll abbreviate his six bullet points to three (since I’m not going to delve into profile analysis in this article):Insulated buildings can have moisture problems because the exterior cladding and sheathing stay colder.Water vapor from the indoor air diffuses through the wall and settles in the cold cladding and sheathing.Vapor barriers are the solution to the problem.It’s a fascinating history, and Rose goes into the details of the different people who advanced the theory of diffusion and vapor barriers, the papers they wrote, and nearly two full pages on the 1952 condensation conference. The big names of the early building science research were F.L. Browne, Larry V. Teesdale, T.S. Rogers, and Frank Rowley. (For more information on Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, see Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?)One of the most amusing parts of the story is how the National Paint and Varnish Association got involved and declared “War Against Water.” Figure 2 below shows thecover of one of the booklets they published in the early 1950s. Written near the beginning of the Cold War, the booklet villainizes moisture much the same as McCarthy maligned communists. For example:They seem innocent enough, these three pools of moisture: the milk from the bottle, the steam from the shower, the vapor rising from the whistling tea kettle. But are they? Oh, no… they’re up to no good. Where do they go from here? Believe it or not, they have an engagement. At the “dewpoint” — if you please.Yeah, we can laugh now, but back then building professionals and homeowners alike were practicing their duck-and-cover drills at the slightest hint of water vapor! Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

3 Dec

Sporadic violence marks Bengal civic polls

first_imgSporadic incidents of violence took place in several parts of West Bengal since polling started on Sunday morning in seven civic bodies, including five municipalities, one municipal corporation and one Notified Area that is a settlement area in transition from rural to urban. While Opposition parties alleged that ruling Trinamool Congress (TMC) cadre were behind the violence, the TMC leadership denied the allegations. Till 7.15 p.m. 77.3% votes were polled. However, this figure is likely to increase as some voters were still in queue. Polls are being held for the Durgapur Municipal Corporation in Paschim Bardhaman district, Dhupguri Municipality in Jalpaiguri district, Buniadpur Municipality in South Dinajpur district, Nalhati Municipality in Birbhum district, Haldia and Panskura Municipalities in the Purba Medinipur district, and the Coopers’ Camp Notified Area in Nadia district. Apart from these, by-polls are being held for one ward in the Jhargram Municipality of Jhargram district, and one ward in the Champdani Municipality of Hooghly district. Most of the incidents of violence took place in the Durgapur Municipal Corporation (DMC) area in Paschim Bardhaman district. Two police personnel were allegedly assaulted and a rifle was snatched by miscreants in the Kada Road area in Durgapur. A polling booth was also vandalised. In the afternoon, bombs were hurled near a polling booth in Ward Number 13 in the Main Gate area.“Two personnel were assaulted and are severely injured. We have got information that there were some people [involved in the incident] who were Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) supporters. The rifle has been recovered,” said a senior official of the Assansol-Durgapur Police Commissionerate. He added that no one has been arrested so far.last_img read more

29 Nov

Yap owns up to missed free throws in loss to TNT

first_img“Those mistakes are mine, I will owe up to those misses,” said Yap, who had a game-high 23 points but went 3-of-7 from the free throw line. “I shut down the distractions, but I missed. The other one went in and out, but those misses are parts of the game.”Yap’s first two misses came with 51 seconds left with the game tied at 101.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingTNT’s rookie guard RR Pogoy took advantage of Yap’s errors and drilled a long jumper that put the KaTropa ahead for good, 103-101, with 26 seconds remaining.Yap had another chance to tie the game but the most he got was a split. Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV View comments Kerber first top seed to lose in 1st round of French Open Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students PLAY LIST 01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast “I regret missing those free throws, if only I could turn back time but I missed. I can’t do anything about it,” said Yap, who finished the conference with a 63 percent conversion rate from the line.“I will own up to my mistakes and move on from there.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR LATEST STORIES PBA IMAGESANTIPOLO—Rain or Shine swingman James Yap took full responsibility of his late-game blunders that allowed TNT to take a 105-102 victory in the PBA Commissioner’s Cup Sunday at Ynares Sports Center here.Those mistakes included three straight missed free throws in the final minute of the game that could’ve tilted the game into the Elasto Painters’ favor.ADVERTISEMENT Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCPlast_img read more

27 Nov

Raptors draw first blood, thump Warriors in 1st NBA finals appearance

first_imgCayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Fans began arriving at Jurassic Park outside the arena in the morning. There were lengthy lines at the arena entrances hours before the game, with some of the few fans who weren’t wearing Raptors red sticking to their original purple uniform with the dinosaur logo.Rapper and Raptors global ambassador Drake sat in his courtside seat wearing a Curry No. 30 jersey. That’s Dell Curry, Stephen’s father who finished his career with the Raptors.”We just got to continue to be ourselves…”After scoring a #NBAPlayoffs career-high 32 PTS, @pskills43 talks over the @Raptors Game 1 win! #WeTheNorth pic.twitter.com/sP19BlHS8d— NBA (@NBA) May 31, 2019The Raptors introduced Dell Curry and some of their other former players after the first quarter, a group that included perennial All-Stars such as Tracy McGrady and Chris Bosh.But it wasn’t until they went out and got Leonard in a trade with San Antonio that Toronto was finally good enough to get to the NBA Finals.He wasn’t the dominant force he was in the first three rounds, when he averaged 31.2 points. But he had eight rebounds and five assists in his first NBA Finals game since winning MVP of the 2014 championship with the Spurs.🔥 @pskills43 (32 PTS, 14-17 FGM) makes 11 CONSECUTIVE field goals, lifting the @Raptors over GSW in Game 1 of the #NBAFinals presented by @YouTubeTV! #WeTheNorth Game 2: Sunday (6/2), 8:00pm/et, ABC & TSN pic.twitter.com/R3TvX8C2mg— NBA (@NBA) May 31, 2019DeMarcus Cousins made it back from a torn left quadriceps to come off the bench in his first NBA Finals game, but the Warriors remained without Kevin Durant, the MVP of the last two NBA Finals. He traveled to Toronto but it’s unclear if he’ll play before the series returns to the Bay Area, with Kerr saying he would have to go through a practice first.The Warriors had won every game since he got hurt in the second round but sure missed him against the Raptors, who are on a roll after falling behind 2-0 to Milwaukee in the Eastern Conference finals.TIP-INSWarriors: Cousins finished with three points in eight minutes. … Draymond Green had his fifth triple-double of the postseason with 10 points, 10 rebounds and assists, but shot just 2 for 9. … Golden State had a 12-game winning streak in Game 1s snapped. … Curry’s four 3-pointers gave him a record 102 in the NBA Finals and he was also 14 for 14 from the free throw line.Raptors: Danny Green went 3 for 7 from 2-point range after he was just 4 for 23 in the conference finals. … The Raptors improved to just 4-15 in Game 1s.UP NEXTGame 2 is Sunday night. “I think they were into it and that’s the way it should be, man,” Raptors coach Nick Nurse said. “That’s what home court is, and our fans deserve a bunch of credit for being a big part of that.”Stephen Curry scored 34 points and Klay Thompson had 21 for the Warriors, who had won all four Game 1s in the last four years. All those had come at home, but this time Golden State doesn’t have home-court — or home country — advantage.Game 2 is Sunday night in Toronto, which is hosting an NBA Finals game for the first time after the Raptors entered the league as an expansion team in 1995.When the Spice hits ya hard 🌶️ pic.twitter.com/c7ZOrsQpXm— Toronto Raptors (@Raptors) May 31, 2019ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP MOST READ LATEST STORIES PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday PLAY LIST 03:12Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday01:43Who are Filipinos rooting for in the NBA Finals?01:08Huge Toronto crowd celebrates Raptors’ historic win02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Toronto Raptors forward Pascal Siakam (43) blocks a shot by Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green (23) during the second half of Game 1 of basketball’s NBA Finals, Thursday, May 30, 2019, in Toronto. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press via AP)TORONTO — Pascal Siakam scored a playoff career-high 32 points and the Toronto Raptors won the first NBA Finals game played outside the U.S., beating the Golden State Warriors 118-109 on Thursday night.The Raptors hardly looked like newcomers to the NBA’s biggest stage, controlling the action most of the way against a Golden State team beginning its fifth straight NBA Finals appearance.ADVERTISEMENT New era for James-Wade in high school link-up of eldest sons The Raptors were perhaps a little jittery at the start, with Kyle Lowry firing a pass well out of bounds on their first possession.But they quickly settled in afterward, building a 10-point lead by halftime.Siakam then went 6 for 6 in the third quarter to keep Golden State from gaining much ground, and the Raptors kept their lead around double digits for much of the final quarter, countering every attempt the Warriors made to catch up.“I thought we made a good effort in the second half, got back in the game. Our guys did some good things, but made too many mistakes to actually go ahead and win the game,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said..@pskills43 heard you, Canada. #WeTheNorth pic.twitter.com/VG7ludtnM0— Toronto Raptors (@Raptors) May 31, 2019All four of the Warriors’ previous finals were against LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, and they struggled to figure out a new opponent. Toronto shot 50.6 percent from the field and the Warriors never found an answer for Siakam, the finalist for Most Improved Player who has a nice start for an NBA Finals MVP resume.The player nicknamed Spicy P was red hot, shooting 14 for 17 from the field — and he tipped in his own shot on the last of those misses with 54 seconds to play. Kawhi Leonard added 23 points and Marc Gasol had 20 for the Raptors, fueled by a crowd that couldn’t wait for a party 24 years in the making.Ball game. Raps win! pic.twitter.com/TYECYB87lhFEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics— Toronto Raptors (@Raptors) May 31, 2019 View commentslast_img read more