18 Nov

Hantavirus cases in 5 states may signal active year

first_img The number of cases reported in January through March matches the pace recorded in 1994 and 1999—both years of high HPS case counts. In both those years, the preceding 1 to 2 years brought environmental conditions that favored a large rodent population, including increased rainfall and plant cover. The larger rodent population, according to the CDC, increased transmission of hantavirus among rodents, which heightened the risk for people. HPS typically begins with a headache, myalgia, and a fever above 101°F, followed shortly by bilateral, diffuse lung edema that can resemble acute respiratory distress syndrome radiographically. Most cases occur in the spring and summer, according to the report, but this seasonal pattern varies by location. Jun 13, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Nine human cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in five states were reported from January through March of 2006, which could signal an above-average risk of the disease this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Editor’s note: A correction was made in this story on Jul 11 (2006) to eliminate errors concerning the numbers of hantavirus cases in Arizona and New Mexico since 1993. Cleaning up potential food sources and nesting sites See also: People contract HPS through contact with the saliva or droppings of rodents, most commonly the deer mouse. The disease is characterized by fever and severe pulmonary symptoms and is fatal 30% to 40% of the time, the report says (the CDC doesn’t say how many of the cases early this year were fatal). The culprit is most often the Sin Nombre virus. Sealing up holes around the home to prevent rodents from entering Taking precautions when cleaning rodent feces or nest sitescenter_img CDC has initiated a “Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!” campaign (see link below) to limit exposure to HPS and other rodent-borne diseases. Measures to prevent HPS include: Trapping rodents in the home to curb the population The report also says that survival probability increases with early disease detection, so healthcare professionals should become familiar with HPS’s presentation. The only treatment, according to the CDC, is supportive care. Since the virus was identified in 1993, the CDC (as of May 10) has confirmed 438 HPS cases in the United States, 35% of which have been fatal. Most cases have occurred in states west of the Mississippi River, with New Mexico (68 cases since 1993), Colorado (49), Arizona (46), and California (43) outpacing other states. As noted in the Jun 9 issue of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, HPS was reported early this year in Arizona (3 cases), New Mexico (3), Texas (1), North Dakota (1), and Washington state (1). The CDC says people should take precautions against the often deadly disease. CDC. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome—five states, 2006. MMWR 2006 Jun 9;55(22):627-8 [Full text] CDC’s “Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!” campaignhttp://www.cdc.gov/rodentslast_img read more

20 Sep

GSA, MDI boys post prelim shutouts; local girls’ teams start playoffs 0-5

first_imgBLUE HILL — The George Stevens Academy and Mount Desert Island boys’ soccer teams advanced to the Northern Maine quarterfinals with shutout victories in Friday’s preliminaries.In Blue Hill, seventh-ranked GSA scored early and often to breeze to an 8-0 win over No. 10 Piscataquis (4-10-1). The victory gave the Eagles their fourth 10-win season in a row and propelled the team to a quarterfinal showdown with Orono.Facing the No. 2 Red Riots on the road Wednesday, GSA went down 1-0 in the first half before Lars Hooper scored in the second to send the game to overtime. After both teams failed to score in the two overtime periods, the game went to penalty kicks.After three rounds of penalty kicks, though, officials made the decision to call the game due to darkness. That decision nullified the entire contest, meaning the Eagles had to return to Orono on Wednesday to replay the quarterfinal.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textIn the replay, GSA went down 2-0 at halftime before scoring twice to force a second overtime game in as many days. Yet Orono (11-4) came away with the win courtesy of Trent Lick, who completed a hat trick to sent the Red Riots past the Eagles (10-6).In Class B North, the MDI boys defeated No. 8 Hermon (6-6-3) 3-0 on the road Friday. Oliver Johnston, Leao Nelson and Derek Collin scored for the ninth-ranked Trojans, who advanced to the quarterfinals for the third time in five years.“That was one of the best games we’ve played all year,” MDI head coach Tyler Frank said of his team’s win over Hermon. “We’ve played that well before, but we haven’t played that well for that long. We were communicating well, and we did very well at being the first team to the ball.”On Tuesday, MDI traveled to The County to take on top-ranked Caribou. The Trojans (6-8-2) fell behind 4-0 to the Vikings (13-1-1) but fought back to make the final score 4-2 with goals from September Murray and Nelson in the final 15 minutes.On the girls’ side, the No. 10 Ellsworth girls traveled to Thorndike to face No. 7 Mount View in prelim action Saturday. Playing in their first playoff game in five years, the Eagles (7-8) fell to the Mustangs (11-4) 3-0.Elsewhere in Class B, the 12th-ranked MDI girls went on the road for a prelim contest against Caribou on Saturday and succumbed to a 2-0 defeat. Jocelyn Hartin and Willow Whitten scored for the No. 5 Vikings (8-4-3), who handed the Trojans (5-9-1) their eighth loss in the past nine games.Hancock County’s misfortunes extended to the lower classes with prelim losses by Bucksport, the No. 8 seed in Class C North, and Deer Isle-Stonington, the No. 12 seed in Class D North. The Golden Bucks finished the year 4-10-1 with a 7-2 home loss against ninth-ranked Penquis Valley (6-7-2), and the Mariners finished 2-11-2 with a 6-0 loss against No. 5 Katahdin (10-5) in Stacyville.In the Class C North quarterfinals, No. 6 GSA (5-6-4) fell 1-0 on the road against third-ranked Fort Kent (8-5-2) on Tuesday. The fifth-ranked Sumner girls (10-2-2), who had their showdown with No. 4 Central (8-4-2) postponed Wednesday, will now face the Red Devils at 5 p.m. tomorrow, Oct. 25, on the turf at Hampden Academy.Sumner’s No. 4 boys’ team (13-1) had its quarterfinal against No. 5 Lee Academy (7-6-1) postponed Tuesday. The game has been rescheduled for 6 p.m. tomorrow under the lights at Ellsworth’s Del Luce Stadium. Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at mmandell@ellsworthamerican.com. Biocenter_img Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020 Latest Posts Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all)last_img read more