18 Nov

Hantavirus cases in 5 states may signal active year

first_img The number of cases reported in January through March matches the pace recorded in 1994 and 1999—both years of high HPS case counts. In both those years, the preceding 1 to 2 years brought environmental conditions that favored a large rodent population, including increased rainfall and plant cover. The larger rodent population, according to the CDC, increased transmission of hantavirus among rodents, which heightened the risk for people. HPS typically begins with a headache, myalgia, and a fever above 101°F, followed shortly by bilateral, diffuse lung edema that can resemble acute respiratory distress syndrome radiographically. Most cases occur in the spring and summer, according to the report, but this seasonal pattern varies by location. Jun 13, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Nine human cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in five states were reported from January through March of 2006, which could signal an above-average risk of the disease this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Editor’s note: A correction was made in this story on Jul 11 (2006) to eliminate errors concerning the numbers of hantavirus cases in Arizona and New Mexico since 1993. Cleaning up potential food sources and nesting sites See also: People contract HPS through contact with the saliva or droppings of rodents, most commonly the deer mouse. The disease is characterized by fever and severe pulmonary symptoms and is fatal 30% to 40% of the time, the report says (the CDC doesn’t say how many of the cases early this year were fatal). The culprit is most often the Sin Nombre virus. Sealing up holes around the home to prevent rodents from entering Taking precautions when cleaning rodent feces or nest sitescenter_img CDC has initiated a “Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!” campaign (see link below) to limit exposure to HPS and other rodent-borne diseases. Measures to prevent HPS include: Trapping rodents in the home to curb the population The report also says that survival probability increases with early disease detection, so healthcare professionals should become familiar with HPS’s presentation. The only treatment, according to the CDC, is supportive care. Since the virus was identified in 1993, the CDC (as of May 10) has confirmed 438 HPS cases in the United States, 35% of which have been fatal. Most cases have occurred in states west of the Mississippi River, with New Mexico (68 cases since 1993), Colorado (49), Arizona (46), and California (43) outpacing other states. As noted in the Jun 9 issue of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, HPS was reported early this year in Arizona (3 cases), New Mexico (3), Texas (1), North Dakota (1), and Washington state (1). The CDC says people should take precautions against the often deadly disease. CDC. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome—five states, 2006. MMWR 2006 Jun 9;55(22):627-8 [Full text] CDC’s “Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!” campaignhttp://www.cdc.gov/rodentslast_img read more

27 Sep

The insane message legalizing ‘death with dignity’ sends to the suicidal

first_imgLifeSiteNews 16 November 2015I’d like the defenders of euthanasia and so-called “death with dignity” to explain something to me. How is the legalization and relentless promotion of “assisted suicide” not the “glorification of suicide”?I’m tired of all of transparently mindless babble about how “assisted suicide” is not a slippery slope. The phrase itself screams with denial: “Wanna kill yourself? Here, let us help you with that.” When helping people kill themselves is referred to as “end-of-life care” rather than “accomplice to murder,” who will be picking up the phone at the other end of the suicide prevention hot line?Here’s the thing. I know many people who struggle with depression. I would wager that everyone does. If we’re honest, we can admit that many people who struggle with mental illness would, in a particularly black moment, consider suicide if it was easily available and relatively painless. That is the reason the number one cause of death by gun in Canada is suicide—because many people who would not have ordinarily taken their own lives do so in a fit of palpable darkness.The idea that our government, our health care system, our society, would send such mixed signals to those contemplating suicide is criminally negligent and outright disgusting. Suicide is never the answer, campaigners used to say. Now, I suppose, they’ll have to qualify. Suicide is never the answer—except sometimes. It’s complicated!That’s already happening.Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.Consider Laura, a healthy 24-year-old from Belgium. Doctors recently approved her request for euthanasia, because she had “suicidal thoughts.” The solution to suicidal thoughts is now suicide, apparently. One of Laura’s friends, who was also suicidal, had died by euthanasia some time previously.The story hasn’t caused much of a stir, though. Five people a day die by euthanasia in Belgium, and reports have emerged that many elderly people are increasingly being killed without their consent, like aging house pets being put to sleep. For some reason, we’ve managed to abolish the death penalty for rapists and serial killers but approved the needle for the old, the sick, and the depressed.And then there is the Netherlands, where a report noted that a minimum of 50% of those killed by euthanasia were suffering from depression at the time. The Dutch researchers didn’t find this a big deal, stating that there was no reason to believe that the death requests by these people were not thought through properly, as if requesting death was not in and of itself a sign of warped thought processes.This is not some conspiracy theory, either. In 2013 the Dutch Health Minister Edith Schippers admitted that there had been at least 45 “psychiatric euthanasia deaths” in that year alone.The impact of families can be tragic, as Tom Mortier can attest. He filed a lawsuit with the European Court of Human Rights to challenge Belgium’s euthanasia laws after doctors killed his mother because of “untreatable depression”—and nothing else. The heart-broken Mortier, who wasn’t even contacted by anyone, said his mother was depressed because of a recent break-up—and the doctors who killed her didn’t even have any psychiatric qualifications.https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/how-is-assisted-suicide-anything-other-than-the-glorification-of-suicidelast_img read more

11 Jan

Ducks beat Huskies

first_imgAaron Brooks scored 30points, making 10 of 14 field goals – including 4 of 7 from 3-point range – to lead No. 23 Oregon to a 93-85 victory over visiting Washington. The victory gave the Ducks sole possession of fourth place in the Pacific-10 Conference. Meanwhile, Washington saw its hopes of sneaking into the NCAA Tournament take a big hit. Tajuan Porter scored 19points and Bryce Taylor added 15 for Oregon, which shot 54percent, including 47percent (9 for 19) from 3-point range. Ryan Appleby led Washington with 21 points, while Spencer Hawes added 21. No. 9 Washington St. 58, Oregon St. 54: Mac Hopson’s jumper with 35.5 seconds to go put Washington State ahead for good and the Cougars held off the Beavers. Washington State was coming off a 64-59 loss to No. 23 Oregon on Thursday. The loss slimmed the Cougars’ chances of catching UCLA in the conference race. center_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

30 Dec

Around Whittier

first_imgMac users groupmeets SaturdayNORWALK – The Whittier Area Macintosh Users Group will meet here from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at 12722 Woods Ave.Members will demonstrate the new operating system from Apple called OS X “Leopard.” They will also answer questions and discuss Apple news.All are welcome to attend.For more information, call (562) 943-4919 or visit www.geocities.com/wamug.Up to speedon labor laws?The Santa Fe Springs Chamber of Commerce and Industrial League is sponsoring a 2008 Labor Law Update seminar from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Dec. 4 at the Radisson Whittier Hotel, 7320 Greenleaf Ave.Topics include wages and hours, leaves of absence and discrimination.The state Legislature, regulatory agencies and courts at the state and federal level have been changing the way you must do business. Learn the new ins and outs from Paul Fleck of the law firm Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo.Seating is limited. The cost is $50 for chamber members and $75 for nonmembers and includes breakfast.Register and pay online 24 hours a day at www.sfschamber.com and clicking on “events” or call (562) 944-1616.Holiday boutiquevendors soughtNORWALK – Vendors are being sought for a holiday boutique from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Norwalk Senior Center, 14040 San Antonio Drive.Crafters who knit, crochet, work with wood, make greeting cards or other goods can register to sell their wares.A table for those 50 or older costs $10. For those younger than 50, a table costs $20.The event is free and open to the public.For more information or to register, call (562) 929-5580.Make a differencefor women awardSoroptimist International of Whittier is seeking applicants for its Making a Difference for Women Award. Eligible nominees are women who, through professional or personal activities, make extraordinary impacts and improve the lives of women and girls.The winner of the club-level award will compete for additional kudos at other levels of the Soroptimist International organization.Nominations should be turned in by Nov. 20.For more information, call Carol Fleck at (562) 698-1272.– From staff reports160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre For information on the watch program, visit www.nwnw.info.Pork feast tobenefit veteransSANTA FE SPRINGS – The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3752 invites you to make a pig of yourselves.Enjoy stuffed pork loin with all the fixings from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Friday at the post, 11912 Rivera Road.Family, friends and neighbors are welcome. The cost is $5.95. All proceeds benefit veterans.For more information, call (562) 698-9059. The North Whittier Neighborhood Watch will host its eighth Night Out beginning at 7 p.m. Thursday at 13597 Ankerton Ave.The purpose is for neighbors to get acquainted and establish a safer neighborhood for children, youths and senior citizens.California Highway Patrol officers, as well as sheriff’s deputies and representatives from Supervisor Gloria Molina’s office will be present.Several houses in the Neighborhood Watch area were burglarized in October. If residents see suspicious individuals in the area, they should call the Sheriff’s Department at (626) 330-3322.last_img read more