16 Sep

LIVE BLOG: Wisconsin vs. Alaska Anchorage Game 2

first_imgWelcome to the Badger Herald live blog. I’m Brett Sommers, Statistics Editorat the Badger Herald, alongside Sports Content Editor Kelly Erickson. We will bebringing you all of tonight’s Game 2 action between Wisconsin and Alaska Anchorage from the Kohl Center.Friday night the Badgers (11-10-1, 6-9-2 WCHA) controlled the game throughout against the Seawolves  (6-13-2, 3-13-1 WCHA), scoring in every period on the way to a 4-0 victory. The biggest story of the night was another lock down performance by UW freshman goalie Joel Rumpel, who secured his second shutout in three games. After being quiet on offense recently the top two Wisconsin offensive weapons, junior defenseman Justin Schultz and sophomore center Mark Zengerle, each tallied three points in the victory. Each finished the game with one goal and two assists. Heading into tonight’s game, Wisconsin looks to reach two games above .500 for the first time all season in an effort to climb higher in  the WCHA standings.Stay tuned for all of tonight’s action.<a href=”http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=fa21935c04″ >Wisconsin vs. Alaska Anchorage Game 2</a>last_img read more

24 Dec

PRIEST GIVEN 27 PER CENT SHARE OF HOME OF EX-LOVER

first_imgFr RosbothamA GAY Catholic priest has today been awarded 27 per cent of a home he once shared with his lover, former Franciscan friar Hugo Crawford.Rose Cottage, in Letterbarrow, is to be now divided, with Mr Crawford getting a 73 per cent share of any future sale. Judge Keenan Johnson told Donegal Town Circuit Court today that he had calculated ownership of the property based on the amount of money he believed each party had contributed to the property.He found Father Rosbotham, a curate in Ballina, Co Mayo, had made a contribution of €22,500 to the cottage whilst Mr Crawford’s contribution amounted to just over €59,000.The court heard yesterday how Fr Rosbotham and Mr Crawford met in the 1980s when they were both Franciscan brothers.Mr Crawford quit the order and paid IR£25k for the house in 1994.In 2000 and 2002 he had applied to add Fr Rosbotham’s name to the title deeds as by that stage the priest had also left the Franciscans – which has a vow of poverty and a ban on ownership of property – and had become a curate in Ballina.Judge Johnson said before delivering his judgement: “They are both clear very decent men who still have considerable regard for each other. They have dedicated their lives to helping others, Fr Rosbotham as a priest and Mr Crawford as a carer.“I think it is unfortunate that this matter had to be aired in court and it certainly strikes me as a case that was tailor-made for mediation. Had the parties agreed to mediation, the matter could have been dealt with in private, with each of the parties retaining ownership of the ultimate resolution.”PRIEST GIVEN 27 PER CENT SHARE OF HOME OF EX-LOVER was last modified: October 17th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal Town Circuit Courtfather rosbothamgayhouseHugo CrawfordPriestlast_img read more

27 Jul

B2B Market Sizing A Quick Easy Way to Estimate Number of Potential

first_imgNote: This post is part of a series on 8 B2B Market Sizing Approaches to Quickly Assess Market Opportunity. Top-Down-Market-SizingMany B2B products and services are sold at the user level. Consequently, the best ways to estimate a market size is to get a sense of the total number of potential users who could buy the product or service and then apply the user-level pricing to the employment count. One of the quickest ways to do this is to pull employment statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), as it tracks U.S. workforce statistics by title/role and industry.This post will help you understand when to use this top-down sizing approach, and will walk you through the process with a step-by-step example below.When is This Approach Useful?This approach works well with products and services that have multiple users in an organization and used by a concentrated type of buyers like accountants or retail sales associates. However, the occupational list does not track all titles in all companies, rather it tracks roles. So sometimes you cannot find an exact match. This same issue exists with the industry classifications.Market Definition Restrictions of the ApproachThe difficulty in using this approach is getting a clear definition of who can use your product or services and then figuring out how to apply this definition using the occupation and industry categories tracked in the BLS.This approach also only works with U.S.-focused businesses and is limited to the occupation and industry categories defined by the BLS.A Step-by-Step Guide to BLS Market SizingStep 1: Develop a clear target user definition.Step 2: Determine if the market is restricted to a subset of industries.Step 3: Go to the BLS employment tables by occupation. Find the occupation category/categories that house your potential buyers/users.Step 4: Now find the relevant industries and pull the employment counts. The data is hierarchical, so be careful not to aggregate summary and detailed level counts.Step 5: Now apply the price per user per month to the employment count. If you have multiple price points, then you will have to figure out how to apply your pricing segmentation model to the BLS data. This is easy if it is by industry and/or role, but is more tricky if it is by size, usage, or some other factor.Example of How to Apply this Model in ActionExample Market Size Question: What is the U.S. market size for a real estate sales associate enablement tool that costs $3 per user per month? And how will this market change by 2022?Question 1: Who are your target users? Real Estate Sales Associates (Non-Brokers). This group is tracked in the BLS under occupation code: 41-9022.Question 2: Is this a horizontal solution or is focused on a subset of industries? No, it is a residential only real estate tool, but can be used in leasing or sales. This is identified as code: 531000 in the BLS data.employment by industry chartQuestion 3: How many retail sales associates are there in the U.S.? 139,100 real estate sales associates.So the market size today is: 139,100 real estate sales associates in the U.S. * 12 Months = $1,669,200What do we project the market size will be in 2022? 1,669,200 * (1 + 12% Forecasted Percentage Change) = $1,869,504Free Tool to Help You Size Your Market Using the BLS ApproachRussell Conard at Ornicept put together an Excel-based tool for helping you size a market using the BLS data. I recommend checking it out if you are looking at sizing a market with users across more than 1 occupation and looking to document how you got at the estimate. It also provides a visualization of the market size to share with you team or prospective investors.Alternative Market Sizing Approaches to ConsiderI also recommend evaluating the other approaches that you could use to get at this question and making sure you are using the most logical approach to get at your market sizing question.Last year, I put together a presentation to train the investment team at OpenView on how to think about B2B market sizing.  I think this is a great source to get you started on how to think about sizing your market. The deck walks you through seven different approaches to quickly sizing a B2B market and provides step by step examples. Check it out below: How to Size a Market Opportunity — Fast from OpenView Venture Partners Another good starting point is my post “The Science of B2B Market Sizing,” which provides tips on how to use the right applications, create a clear market definition, and identify the best market opportunities for your company. Photo by: Nicolai BerntsenAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more