18 Dec

World Coaches Academy at Wits

first_imgThe University of the Wiwatersrand has aproud tradition of football, and is home tothe “Clever Boys”, the Bidvest Wits FCPremier Soccer League team.(Image: Wikipedia)MEDIA CONTACTS• Shirona Patel, communications managerUniversity of the Witwatersrand+27 11 717 1019Shironal.Patel@wits.ac.zaRELATED ARTICLES• From Football to Fly the Flag• Top marks for SA’s World Cup• Out of Africa, something new• A legacy of harmony and pride• World Cup: 97% of SA ‘more proud’ Thato MokhouSouth Africa’s Johannesburg-based University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) and the Netherlands government have joined forces to create a World Cup legacy programme to develop social and football skills in the southern African region.Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbalbond (KNVB), the Dutch football association, saw the need to revolutionise school-level football development in South Africa and decided to make Wits the home of the first World Coaches Academy in the country.As part of conditions set for the Netherlands team to use the university as a training camp for its 2010 Fifa World Cup preparations, the team was required to present a legacy project that would run long after the tournament. The team formulated two projects. The first was to extend the World Coaches Academy to southern Africa, and the second the laying of a brand new astro pitch to develop Wits’ youth programme in Johannesburg’s inner-city area of Hillbrow.“The Wits World Coaches Academy will see 1 000 coaches in the southern African region trained as life-skills mentors and coaches,” says Yunus Ballim, the Wits vice-chancellor in charge of academic affairs.“The academy is a well-established programme in Holland and it seeks to improve the relationship between football and social development. The World Coaches programme launching at Wits has a new dimension and that is the life-skills element.”The university has a proud tradition of football, and is home to the “Clever Boys”, the Bidvest Wits FC Premier Soccer League team.Wits academics Ruksana Osman, Norman Duncan, Eric Worby and Demitri Constantinou have partnered with colleagues from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands to develop a curriculum for the life-skills component of the initiative.Ballim will meet with the deputy vice-chancellors from the Universities of Zambia and Mozambique this week to get their institutions involved in the project.“Our intention is to focus on soccer as social development rather than develop players who will play for premier leagues around the world,” Ballim says. “And that is why we are going to try and focus on teachers in rural and township schools who will become the coaches trained by the World Coaches programme.”The primary aim is to see teachers going back to their schools to develop the lifeskills of their students. The skills taught will include how to deal with crime, poverty and social power relations, and how to take advantage of opportunities for learning.“If we can reach 1 000 coaches in four years, I think we can make an enormous contribution,” Ballim says. Wits will be the academic coordinator and base for the training programme. There will, however, be delivery sites that will reach out to the 1 000 people throughout the southern African region.KNVB have proposed to lay an astro pitch at Sturrock park stadium where the coaches from Wits will be trained and will also improve facilities where the lifeskills lectures will take place.“Sturrock Park will become a soccer-knowledge precinct. In other words, it will be about the knowledge about soccer and also knowledge about the role of soccer in community development,” says Ballim.The programme will also be used as a research, learning and teaching structure, and Ballim encourages Wits students to take part in the initiative.last_img read more

18 Dec

Scientist gets mine drainage patent

first_imgProf Jannie Maree has successfully received a patent to treat acid mine drainage.(Image: www.savingwater.co.za) Masters students Vhahangwele Akin Bologo and Dineo Maila, with Prof Jannie Maree.(Image: Prof Jannie Maree) MEDIA CONTACTS • Professor Jannie Maree   Rand Water Chair, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology  +27 12 382 6343. RELATED ARTICLES • Working towards sustainable mining • CSIR at the World Water Forum • Mining history for new solutionsAneshree NaidooWhen the Witwatersrand Gold Rush began 127 years ago, it birthed the city of Johannesburg, affectionately known in Zulu as eGoli, the City of Gold. But years later, as the ground gave up its last golden nuggets, the abandoned mines have filled up with acidic water that poses a significant pollution threat to the city’s water resources.But South African academics and scientists have been hard at work on solutions to tackle the corrosive mining by-product, and one has successfully applied for, and received, a United States patent for an acid mine water treatment process.A world-leading scientific processProfessor Jannie Maree, Rand Water chair in water utilisation in Tshwane University of Technology’s Faculty of Science, says the magnesium-barium-hydroxide (MBO) process, which removes metals and sulphate from mine water, offered South Africa a technically sound and cost-effective solution for the acid mine water problem.Acid mine drainage is highly acidic water, usually containing high concentrations of metals, sulphides and salts from mining. This acid runoff also dissolves heavy metals such as copper, lead and mercury into ground or surface water, threatening the health of rivers by disrupting aquatic organisms’ growth and reproduction. Further problems include the acidic runoff corroding infrastructure like bridges. Most importantly though, the drainage pollutes groundwater, which contributes to the drinking water supply. In a water-poor country like South Africa this poses a significant problem.So much so that in his 2012 State of the Nation address South Africa’s President Zuma said that R248-million was to be invested over the next two years to deal with acid mine drainage on the Witwatersrand, an extensively mined area in the Greater Johannesburg Metropolitan Area in the province of Gauteng.Gold mining began in 1886 on the Witwatersrand, which stretches 50km from Krugersdorp to the west, to Boksburg to the east. From the 1950s mines across the region started closing down and the last remaining operational mine, East Rand Propriety Mines in Boksburg, closed its operations in 2008.During the mining period, there was infrastructure in place to pump water out of the mines. But as they closed down, the underground voids created from mining operations have filled up as the pumps have ceased. Accumulated water has also flowed into adjacent mines, filling up the entire void.Laboratory success, real world applicationMaree said removing metals and sulphate with the MBO process could produce water that contained levels low enough to be acceptable as drinking water. “This was provided the levels of sodium and chloride in the treated water was low.”He added that the “patented process was used with great success at laboratory level”, where water from coal and gold mines was used. The success of the process success was recorded in Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) postgraduate student Hangwi Bologo’s master’s dissertation.Maree describes the income-generating side to the process, saying “the saleable products from the process would be sulphur, calcium carbonate and the treated water. Depending on the water quality other saleable compounds could be metals and magnesium hydroxide.”He adds: “SA imports its sulphur. Sulphuric acid is produced from sulphur which is an important raw material in the manufacturing of fertiliser.”The water treatment stage is ready for full-scale implementation.  The thermal stage where barium sulphate is processed to barium hydroxide needs to be demonstrated on a pilot scale.  This will be done by September 2014. For full-scale implementation the process will compete with technologies such as reverse osmosis, ion exchange and biological sulphate removal.Acid drainage filtrationAnother academic working on, among others, the acid mine drainage problem, Professor Sunny Iyuke of the University of the Witwatersrand School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, has, with the help of PhD students, developed a membrane to separate waste from water. The membrane has applications across industry, water purification and even medicine.According to Iyuke the membrane (similar to a household water filter) could be used to catch water waste from mines before it entered drains or the water table.last_img read more

16 Dec

The History of Peeling Paint, Insulation, and Vapor Barriers

first_imgInsulation and the early building science researchersI’ve mentioned Bill Rose’s excellent book, Water in Buildings, in this space before, and it’s a wonderful resource. Chapter 3, “Water and Building Materials,” lays out the U.S. history of building science research spurred by the paint-peeling episode of those early adopters of insulation. RELATED ARTICLES Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?How Risky Is Cold OSB Wall Sheathing?Vapor Retarders and Vapor BarriersForget Vapor Diffusion — Stop the Air Leaks!Questions and Answers About Air BarriersQ&A Spotlight: Vapor Barriers Redux Vented Crawl Spaces and the Psychrometric Chart Are Not Friends Q&A: I have a problem with peeling paint Back in the 1930s, a rash of paint-peeling showed up across North America. One thing that most of these homes had in common was insulation in the walls. Painters put two and two together and decided that the problem was the insulation. According to building scientist Bill Rose, the painters surmised that the problem was happening because insulation “draws water,” and some refused to paint insulated houses.Now, I know what you’re thinking. Those painters didn’t want to paint insulated buildings because building science hadn’t been invented yet, and they thought the insulators were jumping the gun. Or was it that painters thought that stuffing the cavities with insulation was silly when all they needed was some good insulating paint? Then again, maybe I’m just jumping to conclusions here, as, it turns out, the proponents of insulated buildings did in their response to the painters’ revolt. Will the real culprit please stand up?Those early building scientists did some good research and advanced our knowledge of vapor diffusion and other building science topics. For example, Teesdale found that a material’s wetness is related to its temperature in what Rose calls the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness: Cold materials tend to be wet and warm materials tend to be dry.They misfired, however, on the cause of the peeling paint. The industry, led by Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, focused almost entirely on moisture diffusion and the need for vapor barriers. (These are also the guys who gave us vented crawl spaces, but that’s another story.) Browne is the one who got it right, way back in 1933. Yes, he mentioned diffusion as one mechanism for the wetting of walls and peeling of paint, but he also called out “poor carpenter work or faulty design,” as Rose quotes him.That is, the bigger problem was bad flashing details, which allowed rainwater to get into the building assemblies — and then stay there. Before insulation, it didn’t matter so much because of the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness. Uninsulated walls stayed warmer and thus dryer. With insulation in the walls, the cladding was colder and that meant it had less tolerance for bad flashing.Another factor more important than vapor diffusion is air leakage. Air moving through leaks in a wall can carry far more water vapor than diffusion allows. Dr. Joseph Lstiburek just wrote about this in his latest article at the Building Science Corp. website: “Air leakage was and is more important than vapor diffusion. Things have not changed.” It’s a great article about MacBeth and vapor barriers, and even though Joe is full of sound and fury, he’s not an idiot. Go read it.The moral of the story is not to jump to conclusions. We learned a lot about vapor diffusion, but our decades-long obsession with vapor barriers was counterproductive and hindered us from learning the more important lesson: It’s generally more important for building assemblies to be able to dry out than it is to prevent wetting by vapor diffusion.I’ll give the last word to Bill Rose on this topic: “Given the fact that a very small percentage of building problems (1 to 5% at most in the author’s experience) are associated with wetting by water vapor diffusion, the argument for enhanced drying potential becomes much stronger.”center_img On the first page of that chapter, Rose outlines how a set of moisture management practices developed in the period from 1937 to 1942, and that’s pretty much how we’ve treated buildings ever since. I’ll abbreviate his six bullet points to three (since I’m not going to delve into profile analysis in this article):Insulated buildings can have moisture problems because the exterior cladding and sheathing stay colder.Water vapor from the indoor air diffuses through the wall and settles in the cold cladding and sheathing.Vapor barriers are the solution to the problem.It’s a fascinating history, and Rose goes into the details of the different people who advanced the theory of diffusion and vapor barriers, the papers they wrote, and nearly two full pages on the 1952 condensation conference. The big names of the early building science research were F.L. Browne, Larry V. Teesdale, T.S. Rogers, and Frank Rowley. (For more information on Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, see Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?)One of the most amusing parts of the story is how the National Paint and Varnish Association got involved and declared “War Against Water.” Figure 2 below shows thecover of one of the booklets they published in the early 1950s. Written near the beginning of the Cold War, the booklet villainizes moisture much the same as McCarthy maligned communists. For example:They seem innocent enough, these three pools of moisture: the milk from the bottle, the steam from the shower, the vapor rising from the whistling tea kettle. But are they? Oh, no… they’re up to no good. Where do they go from here? Believe it or not, they have an engagement. At the “dewpoint” — if you please.Yeah, we can laugh now, but back then building professionals and homeowners alike were practicing their duck-and-cover drills at the slightest hint of water vapor! Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

28 Nov

#KicksStalker: Jordan’s second shoe gets new life

first_imgThe Bred, meanwhile, will come out on Oct. 18 together with the low-top version.No word yet on the Philippine price, but SoleCollector.com reports the regular mid-top versions will cost $185 while the low-tops will be at $160.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparc Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Read Next Photo from Jordan Brand’s official FacebookMichael Jordan’s second signature shoe is set for a resurrection, and this isn’t a new colorway of the same exact design that released in 1986.The new Air Jordan XXXII took inspiration from the Air Jordan II, the shoe that started the legend of his Airness, with its Italian roots and subtle design.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. As per Nike.com, the Air Jordan XXXII will have a Flyknit upper with “high-tenacity yarn.”The sole will feature Zoom Air bags, a Flight Plate, and a herring bone construction underneath.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingReigning NBA MVP Russell Westbrook will be the poster boy of the new design as the Oklahoma City point guard featured in the promo shots wearing the “Bred” colorway.The “Bred,” however won’t be the first colorway to be released as the distinction belongs to the “Rosso Corso,” which will be available on Sept. 23. Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo MOST READcenter_img Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Biggest Pogo service provider padlocked for tax evasion Nara upsets 2004 champion Kuznetsova at US Open Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters View comments LATEST STORIES NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaullast_img read more