10 Feb

WICB’s Nanthan slams Sammy

first_imgROSEAU, Dominica (CMC):The vice-president of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB), Emmanuel Nanthan, yesterday launched a major broadside against Darren Sammy 48 hours after he led West Indies into the history books by becoming the first team to capture the T20 World Cup twice.Nanton has blasted as “irrelevant, demeaning, insulting, and unfortunate” comments made by Sammy minutes after West Indies pulled off a stunning four-wicket victory over England to seal the title.Sammy courted controversy when he hit out at the WICB for its lack of support and praised Prime Minister of Grenada Dr Keith Mitchell and CARICOM for messages of support, which inspired his team.”So to try to make it look like the board was inefficient in any way is rather unfortunate,” declared Nanton in a radio interview in Dominica.”To spoil what was a tremendous achievement for the Caribbean civilisation with comments that are totally irrelevant and demeaning and insulting to the Caribbean people I believe was rather unfortunate”.Contracts disputeSammy’s comments were also made against the backdrop of the players’ contracts dispute with the WICB before the start of the tournament back in February, which threatened the side’s participation.Sammy acted as the players’ representative during the brief impasse.The WICB vice-president also took issue with the players for complaining about a reduction in their fee structure for the World Cup while not disclosing increases in fees for the regional competition.”So the players complained that for the World Cup, their fees went down maybe by US$20,000 or thereabout. But they did not say that the week before they got the World Cup contract, all of them signed contracts for the regional competition, where their fees went up by US$80,000, $140,000, $145,000, and $75,000. They did not say that,” said Nanthan.”But they are saying that they had a loss of US$20,000 each on the World Cup. The World Cup is every other year. Our regional competition is every year. So really and truly, they weremaking noise for losing $20,000 on one side but gaining $150,000 or $280,000 in some instances on the other hand and never ever said that to anybody.”Praised new managerOn Sunday, Sammy also praised newly installed manager Rawl Lewis, who, he said, went to extraordinary lengths to solve a uniform problem during the pre-tournament camp in Dubai.But Nanthan has dismissed Sammy’s comments on this issue as misleading, blaming the impasse for the delay in printing numbers on the uniforms.”The date was coming. The players had not consented to go to play, so the company delivered the uniforms without the numbers in them because we were not sure which players we going to play,” he said.”So when the logistics officer left the Caribbean for Dubai, he had a ticket in his hands to go to pick up the uniforms in Calcutta, put the numbers on them, and carry them himself to the team well before the World Cup.”Earlier, the WICB, in a release, had described Sammy’s comments as “inappropriate” and promised an investigation with a view to taking necessary action.Nanthan’s comments are likely to fuel more tension between the champion West Indies side, which has garnered massive support in the region, and an embattled Dave Cameron-led WICB, which is coming under mounting public pressure to step down.last_img read more

18 Dec

Gas power to assist SA, Mozambique

first_img8 June 2012Plans for a gas-fired power plant to supply electricity to South Africa and Mozambique for two years have been unveiled by UK-based power specialist Aggreko and South African investment company Shanduka.“This is thought to be the first project by a private company to supply an interim cross-border power solution to two utilities in southern Africa, and underlines the potential benefits that can accrue to countries sharing resources,” the two companies said in a statement this week.The 107-megawatt plant in Ressano Garcia on the border of the two countries was approved by South African energy regulator Nersa and the Departments of Energy and Public Enterprises.It will be fuelled by gas from Sasol’s Temane gas field and will service Eskom and its Mozambican counterpart, Electricidade de Moçambique (EDM).It will be located in Ressano Garcia as it is in close proximity to the existing Sasol gas pipeline, which runs from northern Mozambique through to South Africa, as well as a 275 kV transmission corridor.In addition, Aggreko will install containerised power generation units, which will be shipped in from Dumbarton in Scotland, and build gas interconnections, a substation, and a 1.5 km 275 kV transmission line to the main network. This infrastructure will remain intact once the installation is dismantled.Power purchase agreements have been signed by both utilities and Eskom will utilise 92 megawatts of the available capacity, while EDM will use 15. The joint venture is expected to bring in revenues of about US$250-million over its operational period, which should begin in October and carry on until July 2014.Eskom is planning to use the power to bolster its base-load capacity ahead of the introduction of new generation capacity from the Medupi coal-fired power station, which is scheduled to begin operating towards the end of 2013. EDM has contracted with the facility to meet its daily peak demand.The project is expected to complement other alternative energy initiatives South Africa is embarking on, including a 100 MW concentrated solar power plant in Upington in the Northern Cape, as well as a 100 MW wind power project in Sere, outside Cape Town.Eskom is also currently building two major coal-fired power stations, Medupi and Kusile, in Limpopo and Mpumalanga respectively. But until the completion of the stations, South Africa’s high energy demands are expected to continue to threaten the country’s supply.It is hoped that with the agreement this week, both South Africa and Mozambique will get much-needed additional power, with the project also underlining the importance of the two countries as energy hubs for the entire southern African region.According to Aggreko’s chief executive, Rupert Soames, the contract was not only important for South Africa and Mozambique but for southern Africa as a whole.“We also hope this project will be an example for other countries seeking to optimise their resources and manage the supply of regional power.”The companies envisage employment and training of about 100 locals with the procurement process tailored to benefit South African companies.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

16 Dec

The History of Peeling Paint, Insulation, and Vapor Barriers

first_imgInsulation and the early building science researchersI’ve mentioned Bill Rose’s excellent book, Water in Buildings, in this space before, and it’s a wonderful resource. Chapter 3, “Water and Building Materials,” lays out the U.S. history of building science research spurred by the paint-peeling episode of those early adopters of insulation. RELATED ARTICLES Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?How Risky Is Cold OSB Wall Sheathing?Vapor Retarders and Vapor BarriersForget Vapor Diffusion — Stop the Air Leaks!Questions and Answers About Air BarriersQ&A Spotlight: Vapor Barriers Redux Vented Crawl Spaces and the Psychrometric Chart Are Not Friends Q&A: I have a problem with peeling paint Back in the 1930s, a rash of paint-peeling showed up across North America. One thing that most of these homes had in common was insulation in the walls. Painters put two and two together and decided that the problem was the insulation. According to building scientist Bill Rose, the painters surmised that the problem was happening because insulation “draws water,” and some refused to paint insulated houses.Now, I know what you’re thinking. Those painters didn’t want to paint insulated buildings because building science hadn’t been invented yet, and they thought the insulators were jumping the gun. Or was it that painters thought that stuffing the cavities with insulation was silly when all they needed was some good insulating paint? Then again, maybe I’m just jumping to conclusions here, as, it turns out, the proponents of insulated buildings did in their response to the painters’ revolt. Will the real culprit please stand up?Those early building scientists did some good research and advanced our knowledge of vapor diffusion and other building science topics. For example, Teesdale found that a material’s wetness is related to its temperature in what Rose calls the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness: Cold materials tend to be wet and warm materials tend to be dry.They misfired, however, on the cause of the peeling paint. The industry, led by Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, focused almost entirely on moisture diffusion and the need for vapor barriers. (These are also the guys who gave us vented crawl spaces, but that’s another story.) Browne is the one who got it right, way back in 1933. Yes, he mentioned diffusion as one mechanism for the wetting of walls and peeling of paint, but he also called out “poor carpenter work or faulty design,” as Rose quotes him.That is, the bigger problem was bad flashing details, which allowed rainwater to get into the building assemblies — and then stay there. Before insulation, it didn’t matter so much because of the Fundamental Rule of Material Wetness. Uninsulated walls stayed warmer and thus dryer. With insulation in the walls, the cladding was colder and that meant it had less tolerance for bad flashing.Another factor more important than vapor diffusion is air leakage. Air moving through leaks in a wall can carry far more water vapor than diffusion allows. Dr. Joseph Lstiburek just wrote about this in his latest article at the Building Science Corp. website: “Air leakage was and is more important than vapor diffusion. Things have not changed.” It’s a great article about MacBeth and vapor barriers, and even though Joe is full of sound and fury, he’s not an idiot. Go read it.The moral of the story is not to jump to conclusions. We learned a lot about vapor diffusion, but our decades-long obsession with vapor barriers was counterproductive and hindered us from learning the more important lesson: It’s generally more important for building assemblies to be able to dry out than it is to prevent wetting by vapor diffusion.I’ll give the last word to Bill Rose on this topic: “Given the fact that a very small percentage of building problems (1 to 5% at most in the author’s experience) are associated with wetting by water vapor diffusion, the argument for enhanced drying potential becomes much stronger.”center_img On the first page of that chapter, Rose outlines how a set of moisture management practices developed in the period from 1937 to 1942, and that’s pretty much how we’ve treated buildings ever since. I’ll abbreviate his six bullet points to three (since I’m not going to delve into profile analysis in this article):Insulated buildings can have moisture problems because the exterior cladding and sheathing stay colder.Water vapor from the indoor air diffuses through the wall and settles in the cold cladding and sheathing.Vapor barriers are the solution to the problem.It’s a fascinating history, and Rose goes into the details of the different people who advanced the theory of diffusion and vapor barriers, the papers they wrote, and nearly two full pages on the 1952 condensation conference. The big names of the early building science research were F.L. Browne, Larry V. Teesdale, T.S. Rogers, and Frank Rowley. (For more information on Teesdale, Rogers, and Rowley, see Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?)One of the most amusing parts of the story is how the National Paint and Varnish Association got involved and declared “War Against Water.” Figure 2 below shows thecover of one of the booklets they published in the early 1950s. Written near the beginning of the Cold War, the booklet villainizes moisture much the same as McCarthy maligned communists. For example:They seem innocent enough, these three pools of moisture: the milk from the bottle, the steam from the shower, the vapor rising from the whistling tea kettle. But are they? Oh, no… they’re up to no good. Where do they go from here? Believe it or not, they have an engagement. At the “dewpoint” — if you please.Yeah, we can laugh now, but back then building professionals and homeowners alike were practicing their duck-and-cover drills at the slightest hint of water vapor! Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

15 Oct

Jerry OConnell loves North Bay talks new TV show Carter

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook O’Connell was born in Manhattan but seems Canadian because: he’s super nice, even while being interviewed on the phone at 1 a.m., his time; his favourite TV show is “Schitt’s Creek”; and when he’s not working in Canada, he’s working with Canadians.The 44-year-old made his film debut in 1986 as one of the young lads scrambling across railway tracks in Rob Reiner’s memorable feature “Stand By Me.” Among his co-stars: a young Kiefer Sutherland.O’Connell was in Toronto for three of his teen years shooting the CTV comedy “My Secret Identity.” He was cast opposite Second City veteran Derek McGrath, who, as O’Connell points out, is from the northern Ontario town of Porcupine, near Timmins.It was during those “My Secret Identity” years that O’Connell started identifying with the Canadian anthem. “You go to enough Leafs games, Jays games and Argo games, you pick it up.”He sang it loud and proud last fall with a children’s choir on the ice at an OHL North Bay Battalion game. “That night we went out after the game to a bar,” he says. “The whole crew was critiquing my performance of the national anthem. They said I was drowning out the kids.”Several years after “My Secret Identity,” O’Connell was cast alongside another Canadian, Jill Hennessy, on the U.S. network drama “Crossing Jordan.”“She was born in Edmonton and grew up in Ontario,” says O’Connell, who knows his Canadian towns, cities and actresses.After that series, about 10 years ago, O’Connell was cast in the short-lived U.S. sitcom “Carpoolers” which was created by Bruce McCulloch from “Kids in the Hall.”“I have Bruce McCulloch to thank for this job,” says O’Connell of “Carter.” According to the actor, McCulloch told “Carter” creator Garry Campbell (a former “Kids in the Hall” writer who also has worked on “Kim’s Convenience” and “Less than Kind”) that he should cast the American.“He said, ‘Jerry’s not that reliable but you’ll have fun working with him,”‘ suggests O’Connell. “I’m totally joking — that was a joke. He must have said something positive. I got hired.”O’Connell does squeeze in the occasional job on American soil. He’s in this week’s season finale of “The Big Bang Theory.” As Sheldon’s seldom-seen big brother Georgie, he’s among the guests at the wedding of characters Sheldon and Amy.His nine-year-old twin daughters — big “Young Sheldon” fans — are thrilled dad’s going to be on “Big Bang.” O’Connell is married to actress Rebecca Romijn, who brought the kids to Canada for a visit during the series shoot.O’Connell truly fell in love with North Bay, which, thanks to tax incentives, has become a thriving film and TV production site. He kept running into Billy Campbell, Karine Vanasse and the cast of “Cardinal” while in North Bay, and advocates for a “Carter”-“Cardinal” crossover.“I really do feel like I have a job to do in letting people know that the north is gorgeous and everybody should come up there,” says O’Connell. “Not only is it a beautiful place to shoot, it’s a beautiful place to come visit.”He’s looking forward to returning to the city this week for a special premiere screening of “Carter.”“Everybody who works at Timmy Ho-Ho’s is going to be there. It’s going to be crazy.” How many American TV stars could come up to Canada and belt out our national anthem at a hockey game without a teleprompter?Jerry O’Connell performed the task — without missing a word — while working on his new series “Carter” in North Bay, Ont.If that doesn’t sound honourary Canadian enough, here’s the plot of “Carter,” which premieres Tuesday, May 15, on Bravo: a Canadian actor (O’Connell), who stars in a top-rated American detective series, heads back to his small town in Northern Ontario to escape the phoniness of Hollywood. He reunites with his old pals from high school (played by Sydney Tamiia Poitier and Kristian Bruun) and together they form a crime-solving team.center_img Actors Jerry O’Connell and Sydney Tamiia Poitier are shown in a scene from the television show “Carter.” (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO)THE CANADIAN PRESS Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more