19 Jan

Vicente hopes for continuous volleyball program after Macandili plum

first_imgNational team head coach Francis Vicente. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOBIÑAN, Laguna—Philippine head coach Francis Vicente had a high vantage point as he watched his defensive ace Dawn Macandili claim the second Best Libero award in the AVC Asian Senior Women’s Volleyball Championship.And as the national mentor looked on, he immediately knew a perpetual volleyball program for the country can produce more players like Dawn Macandili.ADVERTISEMENT 2 nabbed in Bicol drug stings Filipino fans make Korea star Kim Yeon-koung feel at home View comments Vilma Santos, Luis Manzano warn public of fake account posing as her Albay to send off disaster response team to Batangas Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite LATEST STORIES “This is why we need to just trust on a continuous program for a national team,” said Vicente Thursday at Alonte Sports Arena.CONTRIBUTED PHOTOThe Philippines team for the AVC and the upcoming Southeast Asian Games was formed just few months before the grueling August stretch.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Vicente added that other positions could also win individual awards in international tournaments and not just the Best Libero plum.“Let’s be patient, let’s support the national team,” said Vicente. “For me we should all be united and stop the crab mentality that we drag other players down.” Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Teen gunned down in Masbate Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano MOST READ 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

18 Dec

Still farming at 88 with no signs of stopping

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It seems like an everyday occurrence that something is unveiled in agriculture that is the next greatest thing. Products that will boost yields, thwart diseases and insects and plant at twice the speed of sound are certainly steps forward in producing enough food, fiber and fuel for our ever-increasing world population.Although we can never stop thinking about how agriculture needs to look in the future, I believe that some of the greatest assets of our industry have been around for awhile.Recently, I stopped by a half-harvested soybean field in Shelby County and jumped in a John Deere combine that was being piloted by 88-year old Bernard Clinehens.Clinehens is a true veteran, not only in the military sense, but also with his 8 plus decades of farming experience. I have always felt that one of the best ways to move agriculture forward is to take a look at the past. Farmers like Clinehens have seen it all and have survived. In his lifetime, Clinehens has seen a Great Depression, a Dust Bowl, a Prohibition, multiple wars, two new states and a boom in technology, both on and off of the farm, that changed the way we live today. Who wouldn’t want to learn from someone like that?Clinehens mentioned a time or two about the “auto-steer” function on his machine and how he could head down the rows without a hand on the wheel. Heck, he was just as thrilled that the combine had a cab. He swallowed a lot of dust when he first started farming, after deciding becoming a teacher wasn’t for him.As you might imagine, Clinehens has been asked many times by many younger farmers what it takes to make it in this business. His answer didn’t have a thing to do with outguessing the markets, or having all of the newfangled gear, but it had everything to do with enjoying the job.Who, after 88 years of doing anything would still be doing it with a smile, except for a farmer? Thanks for the ride, Mr. Clinehens. I learned more in 30 minutes in your cab than I have learned in a long time.Take a look at some of our conversation with this Cab Cam video featuring Bernard Clinehens.last_img read more

3 Dec

Kashmir colleges to remain shut

first_imgStudents in the Kashmir Valley continued protests for the third consecutive day on Wednesday, forcing the authorities to close down all 46 colleges for two more days. “Teaching work in all colleges of the Kashmir division will remain suspended on April 20 and 21 as a precautionary measure,” said a spokesman of the Divisional Commissioner, Kashmir, Baseer Khan.Class work was stopped in all colleges and a few schools in Srinagar on Monday after students clashed with the security forces, leaving dozens injured. The trigger was the alleged police excesses on students of Government Degree College, Pulwama on April 13, which left over 50 students injured.In fresh protests on Wednesday, students took to the streets in north and central Kashmir. “This is a grim situation. We are worried,” said a spokesman of the State Education Ministry. The ministry officials claimed that the decision to close down schools and colleges “is taken by the district administration after assessing the ground situation”.This year’s academic session, like in 2016, when five months were lost to the street agitation, is again staring at a blank. Sources said the government was mulling multiple measures, including barring circulation of videos on social media platforms to stop unrest in colleges. Separatist leaders, Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Mohammad Yasin Malik, while strongly criticising the administration for “invading educational institutions and assaulting students,” called for solidarity protests on Friday.Meanwhile, the principal of Government Degree College, Pulwama, which is at the centre of the storm, was on Tuesday attached to the directorate office “till the inquiry is completed.”last_img read more