3 Jan

Israeli court: Land sales must include Arabs

first_imgUnder the deal accepted Monday by the Israeli court, while the fund would agree to sell land to Arabs, the Israel Lands Authority would give the JNF an equal amount of land in exchange. That would allow the fund to tell its contributors that it still maintains its original function of providing land for Jews in Israel. The court ordered the fund to come up with a permanent solution in three months. Critics charged that the deal still discriminates against Israel’s Arabs, who make up about 20 percent of the population. “The JNF’s policy could create a total separation between Arabs and Jews in where they live,” said Auni Bana, a lawyer with one of the petitioners, the Association for Civil Rights in Israel. “This is racism.” On the other side, die-hard fund donors insisted they won’t let the organization back down. Israeli Nobel laureate Robert Aumann and former military chief Moshe Yaalon said they want to join the court case on the side of the JNF.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! JERUSALEM – Israel’s Supreme Court on Monday gave the country’s main land distributor three months to change its policy of selling property only to Jews – a practice that Israel’s Arab minority deems racist. The policy also has provoked criticism of the Jewish National Fund – one of world Jewry’s most beloved organizations. Supporters of the fund insist it has the right to refuse to market its lands to Arabs. The case points up a basic contradiction Israel has been grappling with for decades: maintaining its Jewish character while offering equality to its Arab minority in the framework of a democratic regime. The venerable Jewish group in effect acknowledged before the court that it can no longer eliminate Israeli Arabs from its land transactions, agreeing to reinstitute a complex land-for-land deal to try to keep everyone happy. “I think part of this is redefining the vision of what the JNF is all about,” said Mike Nitzan, a member of the fund’s board. The fund is a century-old symbol of the drive to reclaim the Holy Land and fill it with Jews. Founded in 1901, it is known around the Jewish world for its little blue collection boxes, where Jews contributed money to buy land for settlement. A century later, the fund is still in the business of providing land for Jewish settlement in Israel, owning about 13 percent of the land in the country. But even some Jewish critics say it has outlived its usefulness in a modern, democratic state that grants equal rights to non-Jewish minority citizens. Legal expert Moshe Negbi told Israel Radio the fund should have been phased out when the state of Israel was created in 1948. last_img read more

3 Jan

Boost for Burnley as defender Duff has red card rescinded

first_img1 Burnley defender Michael Duff Burnley defender Michael Duff is free to play in Saturday’s relegation six-pointer at Hull after the Football Association rescinded the red card he received against West Ham.The Clarets centre-back was sent off for tripping Cheikhou Kouyate in the penalty area during last Saturday’s 1-0 defeat at Upton Park.Referee Jonathan Moss issued a straight red to Duff as he thought West Ham had been denied a clear goal-scoring opportunity, but there was cover for Burnley in the box.The FA confirmed in a statement that the red card had been overturned.“An Independent Regulatory Commission has today upheld a claim of wrongful dismissal in relation to Michael Duff,” it read.“The Burnley defender was dismissed in the game against West Ham United on Saturday 2 May 2015 for denying an obvious goalscoring opportunity.“Therefore, his one-match suspension has been withdrawn with immediate effect.”Mark Noble scored the penalty Moss awarded in the 23rd minute and Burnley went on to lose their fourth straight match.The Clarets therefore need to win at the KC Stadium this weekend to keep alive their faint survival hopes.The Lancashire club are bottom of the table, eight points below 17th-placed Hull with three matches to go.After Saturday’s trip to Hull, Burnley host Stoke and round the season off with a visit to fellow relegation candidates Aston Villa.last_img read more

28 Dec

GAA STAR CASSIDY PLEADS GUILTY TO AFFRAY CHARGE

first_imgDonegal star Kevin Cassidy has appeared in court charged with causing an affray.The Gaoth Dobhair player pleaded guilty to threatening unlawful violence when he appeared at Letterkenny Circuit Court today.Cassidy, 30, of Cotteen, Derrybeg appeared wearing suit trousers and a dark jumper. He pleaded guilty to the charge.He is a teacher at a special needs school in Letterkenny and is a fluent Irish speaker.Cassidy’s brother Stephen, 37, of Upper Brinaleck, Gweedore also appeared in court charged with assault causing harm.He also pleaded guilty to the charge.The incident happened on the evening of August 24th, 2008 at Ard na gCeapairi, Derrybeg, Gweedore.Two other brothers also appeared in court charged with offences related to the same incident.Shaun Maguire, 28, of Ardsbeg, Gortahork pleaded guilty to engaging in threatening behaviour in a public place.His brother Michael, 21, of Ardsbeg, Gortahork pleaded guilty to causing an affray in a public place with threatening behaviour.Judge John O’Hagan adjourned the case until July and said the issue of community service should be considered.AT HEARING – © 2011 donegaldaily.com, all Rights ReservedThe copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law.Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailyCOMMENTS ARE CLOSED ON ONGOING COURT CASESGAA STAR CASSIDY PLEADS GUILTY TO AFFRAY CHARGE was last modified: February 1st, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:AFFRAYJUdge John O’HaganKevin CassidyLETTERKENNY CIRCUIR COURTSTEPHEN CASSIDYlast_img read more

25 Dec

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgTUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for its weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. WEDNESDAY Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org THURSDAY THANKSGIVING FRIDAY Fun After Forty ballroom dance group will not meet due to the Thanksgiving holiday. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Emotional Freedom Technique Group offers weekly demonstrations and practices, 6:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends). Self-help tapping technique used to reduce or eliminate stress, cravings, pains, fears, phobias. Call (661) 945-4045. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet, 5:30 p.m. at Foxy’s Southwestern Restaurant, 46643 60th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586 for reservations by Friday. Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30 p.m. Sunday at 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $7. Club membership: $20. Call (661) 718-8997. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with panic attacks, anxiety or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, third floor. Call (661) 943-3956. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at the Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

20 Dec

San Jose Sharks react to Joe Thornton’s one-game suspension

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the gallery on your mobile device.LAS VEGAS — The Sharks on Tuesday were disappointed but not altogether surprised that Joe Thornton was suspended for one game for an illegal check to the head of Vegas Golden Knights forward Tomas Nosek in Game 3.Thornton received the suspension Monday, hours after he, general manager Doug Wilson and coach Pete DeBoer had a hearing with the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. Thornton will sit out Tuesday’s Game 4 of the …last_img read more

18 Dec

World Coaches Academy at Wits

first_imgThe University of the Wiwatersrand has aproud tradition of football, and is home tothe “Clever Boys”, the Bidvest Wits FCPremier Soccer League team.(Image: Wikipedia)MEDIA CONTACTS• Shirona Patel, communications managerUniversity of the Witwatersrand+27 11 717 1019Shironal.Patel@wits.ac.zaRELATED ARTICLES• From Football to Fly the Flag• Top marks for SA’s World Cup• Out of Africa, something new• A legacy of harmony and pride• World Cup: 97% of SA ‘more proud’ Thato MokhouSouth Africa’s Johannesburg-based University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) and the Netherlands government have joined forces to create a World Cup legacy programme to develop social and football skills in the southern African region.Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbalbond (KNVB), the Dutch football association, saw the need to revolutionise school-level football development in South Africa and decided to make Wits the home of the first World Coaches Academy in the country.As part of conditions set for the Netherlands team to use the university as a training camp for its 2010 Fifa World Cup preparations, the team was required to present a legacy project that would run long after the tournament. The team formulated two projects. The first was to extend the World Coaches Academy to southern Africa, and the second the laying of a brand new astro pitch to develop Wits’ youth programme in Johannesburg’s inner-city area of Hillbrow.“The Wits World Coaches Academy will see 1 000 coaches in the southern African region trained as life-skills mentors and coaches,” says Yunus Ballim, the Wits vice-chancellor in charge of academic affairs.“The academy is a well-established programme in Holland and it seeks to improve the relationship between football and social development. The World Coaches programme launching at Wits has a new dimension and that is the life-skills element.”The university has a proud tradition of football, and is home to the “Clever Boys”, the Bidvest Wits FC Premier Soccer League team.Wits academics Ruksana Osman, Norman Duncan, Eric Worby and Demitri Constantinou have partnered with colleagues from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands to develop a curriculum for the life-skills component of the initiative.Ballim will meet with the deputy vice-chancellors from the Universities of Zambia and Mozambique this week to get their institutions involved in the project.“Our intention is to focus on soccer as social development rather than develop players who will play for premier leagues around the world,” Ballim says. “And that is why we are going to try and focus on teachers in rural and township schools who will become the coaches trained by the World Coaches programme.”The primary aim is to see teachers going back to their schools to develop the lifeskills of their students. The skills taught will include how to deal with crime, poverty and social power relations, and how to take advantage of opportunities for learning.“If we can reach 1 000 coaches in four years, I think we can make an enormous contribution,” Ballim says. Wits will be the academic coordinator and base for the training programme. There will, however, be delivery sites that will reach out to the 1 000 people throughout the southern African region.KNVB have proposed to lay an astro pitch at Sturrock park stadium where the coaches from Wits will be trained and will also improve facilities where the lifeskills lectures will take place.“Sturrock Park will become a soccer-knowledge precinct. In other words, it will be about the knowledge about soccer and also knowledge about the role of soccer in community development,” says Ballim.The programme will also be used as a research, learning and teaching structure, and Ballim encourages Wits students to take part in the initiative.last_img read more

18 Dec

Public-private partnerships in national parks to boost tourism

first_imgSix million people visited our 19 national parks last year. This presented a huge opportunity for private investors, delegates were told at the inaugural South African National Parks Tourism Investment Summit held in Johannesburg this week.Opportunities in the Sanparks public-private partnership programme include accommodation, bottled water, wellness centres and adventure activities. (Image: South African Tourism, Flickr)Melissa JavanMore than 50 public-private partnership (PPP) opportunities are available for investors in South African National Parks.This emerged at the inaugural Sanparks Tourism Investment Summit in Johannesburg on Tuesday 4 April 2017. Sanparks, which falls under the Department Environmental Affairs, manages South Africa’s 19 national parks – from the massive Kruger Park in the east to the tiny Bontebok National Park in the west.The summit showcased a range of opportunities available to private investors in 10 of these public-owned parks. The opportunities include the development of tented camps, lodges and boutique hotels, activities such as helicopter and hot air balloon trips, zip-lining and hiking activities, and retail kiosks.Business and conservationIn 2016, over 10-million foreign tourists arrived in South Africa. According to Sanparks, 6-million people visited its parks in the past financial year. The country’s tourism sector accounts for some 730 000 jobs – 4.5% of total employment.In her keynote address at the summit, Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa said partnerships between the government and private sector could only increase tourism’s contribution to employment.The Sanparks summit, she said, would help public officials and private businesspeople working in the tourism sector to engage and network with each other.“The national parks don’t only play a conservation role,” she said. “We cannot just rely on the fiscus and say, please government, give us money.”There are currently 45 PPPs in operation in South Africa’s national parks. These give private partners access to state property for a certain period, allowing them to conduct business there.This model transfers risk to the private sector and allows Sanparks to focus on its core function: wildlife conservation. According to Molewa, seven national parks are currently being used for PPPs. She said there was a possibility to include all 19 parks in these partnerships, nationally.“In 2016, over 10 million tourist arrivals were recorded in #SouthAfrica, a 13% increase from 2015″ – Minister BEE Molewa#InvestSanparks— Sanparks (@Sanparks) April 4, 2017Through our PPP programme, R57 million per annum is spent on SMME and a total of 1946 direct jobs have been created.#InvestSanparks pic.twitter.com/2nZc7CnReV— Sanparks (@Sanparks) April 4, 2017There are 4 major categories of opportunities, these are:Accommodation, Restaurants, Retail and Activities#InvestSanparks— Sanparks (@Sanparks) April 4, 2017Return on investmentTokozile Xasa, South Africa’s new minister of tourism, said at the conference that many of today’s investors want more than just profit. “They want to make a contribution in the lives of people.”Tourism investment would help reduce poverty and inequality. “Tourism is the one sector all over the world that countries can look at to turn around the economy.”Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa and Tourism Minister Tokozile Xasa at the inaugural Sanparks Tourism Investment Summit in Johannesburg. (Image: Melissa Javan)Xasa said those who did invest in South Africa’s tourism industry would get value. Her department provides skills training to entrepreneurs to ensure tourism businesses survive and thrive.She added that PPP opportunities would encourage local and international businesspeople to visit Sanparks’ attractions. “We are hoping to attract more business events to our parks. The businesspeople can then be exposed to what else South Africa has to offer.”Private party operators interested in any of these opportunities should register their interest by email toannemi.vanjaarsveld@sanparks.org https://t.co/xLtbfsH5iw— Sanparks (@Sanparks) April 4, 2017Boosting domestic travelSisa Ntshona, head of South African Tourism, said that although international tourists were flocking to the country, domestic tourism was weak.If each South African could link their economic well-being and prosperity to tourism, he said, it would help grow the domestic sector. “We need to cultivate a travel culture into South Africans, especially the youth. We should look at how we can inform and educate our children to increase domestic travel.”Ntshona said the country needed more tour guides, especially those able to share the stories and experiences of historical sites. “We need more young people, but they need to be knowledgeable. We’ve got to make tourism everybody’s business.”It was also important for small businesses to build networks in the communities in which they operate, he said. “If you are not plugged in, you will not make it. Look at how you can become visible, and who the tourism operators are within the community.”Discussing opportunities and challenges in South African tourism at the Sanparks summit. From left: moderator and former talk show host John Robbie, Sisa Ntshona of South African Tourism, Hannelie du Toit of South African Tourism Services Association and Blacky Komani of Tourvest Holdings. (Image: Melissa Javan)Bringing black South Africans into tourismAn important issue raised at the summit was the lack of black people taking part in South Africa’s tourism sector.Hannelie du Toit of the South African Tourism Services Association said more local heroes were needed need to promote tourism. “We need our black entrepreneurs to be involved and say that they want to get involved in the tourism industry.”Rob Cilliers of Sun International said specific products should be created for specific markets. The Cape Town International Jazz Festival, for example, was well supported by the black market.“Put on the product to bring the people. We cater for the full community of South Africa.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

9 Dec

You Have One Set of Values

first_imgI received an email from a subscriber to my weekly newsletter. She was unhappy with something I’d written about my childhood, and she asked me to please limit my email newsletter to business-related topics. But there is no personal life and professional life. There is just life. You are who you are, wherever you are and whatever you are doing.You don’t have one set of values when it comes to business and a separate set of values when it comes to your personal life. But even if you did, it wouldn’t matter. Your real values would still be the lowest standard you set for yourself.If you wouldn’t dare steal in your personal life but you do steal at work, you are still a thief. The location as to where the theft occurs doesn’t change it’s nature (or yours).If you are rude to people and treat them poorly at work while being a prince at home, you are still a rude person. The fact that you are polite to some people doesn’t change the fact that you are rude to others.If you are a gossip at work it’s likely you are a gossip at home, too. But even if you didn’t gossip at home you’d still be a gossip.If you have a substance abuse problem that doesn’t prevent you from showing up to the office, you are a still a person with a substance abuse problem, even if you are highly functioning. Substance abuse may begin as a value issue, but addiction that comes later is an illness. You are still ill, whether at home or at work.What you do on your personal time is your business, but it doesn’t change your values. Your standards for yourself are yours and yours alone. You are who you are, wherever you are and whatever you are doing. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

9 Dec

The Stupid Idea of Being a Closer

first_imgEvery week I receive an InMail or a connection request on LinkedIn from a person who describes them as a “high ticket closer,” an inaccurate description of both the individual and their skill set. Also not something a salesperson should ever strive to become.First, let’s dispatch with the idea of “high ticket.” The idea that $2,997 is a “high ticket” is an indication that the person describing themselves in this way is not a “high ticket” anything, that number being minuscule. Real Estate Agents, automobile salespeople, and a reasonably good tailor all have average sales that are many times larger, and business-to-business salespeople would find that description laughable.Second, let’s deal with the idea of “being a closer.” Your intentions in sales matter. Who you are matters. Your character matters. What you do and how you do it projects these things to others. The idea that one should be a closer suggests that what matters most is a signed contract, making the entire interaction about the outcome the person selling wants and not about the person buying and their results. I am forced here to use the clumsy description “the person selling,” because such a person is not worthy of calling themselves a salesperson.These “closers” have been taught to manipulate and pressure individuals to buy by con-artists and charlatans who used the very same tactics to sell them a get rich quick scheme (another unfortunate, but accurate, term as these snake oil salesmen are not selling a solution as much as they are selling the individual a dream, and nothing more). These would-be wolves don’t know they’re sheep.Your Philosophy and Your IntentionsIn The Lost Art of Closing: Winning the 10 Commitments That Drive Sales, I wrote about the importance of having a philosophy of sales that guides your intentions and your actions. I summed up this other-oriented philosophy with this idea: “Selling isn’t something you do to someone. It is something you do with and for someone.” Once one understands and embodies this philosophy, selling is a whole lot easier.The idea that one needs “to close” their prospective client suggests that the person is doing something “to” their prospect—not for them or with them. The idea that one needs to close a sale in a single interaction and that pressure must be applied is evidence that the person selling doesn’t know how to sell. Pressure, force, and manipulation are the tactics and tricks of those who don’t know how to sell. You’ll have to forgive my strong language here, but it also makes you a five-star, gold-plated asshole.These are the approaches of those who wish to get rich quick. It’s what one does when they know no better, and when they are looking for a result without having to do the necessary work. They are looking for a way to hack the outcome. It is an immature mentality, the mindset of a small child, the tactics of one who is not mature enough to delay their gratification. You should outgrow this by around the age of six or seven.Grown Up SalesI don’t need to write what follows. If you are a professional salesperson, nothing I say here is going to provide you with anything more than a confirmation of who you are and what you already believe. What follows is for those who may need a more accurate understanding of what closing means to real salespeople.In sales, it is essential to gain commitments (video). Those commitments are what allows a salesperson and their prospective clients to have the conversations necessary to explore change, collaborate and evaluate potential solutions, determine the appropriate and necessary investment, review the solution, and resolve the prospective client’s concerns. The commitment to decide to move forward is the easiest and most natural outcome when a salesperson helps their potential client by creating value through this process (or something like it).If the commitment to move forward isn’t easy for you to obtain, it’s an indication that you didn’t do an excellent job throughout the sales conversation. It might also be that you have been taught to be a smarmy, self-oriented person who mistakenly believes what they are doing is selling, in which case, your approach repels your prospects. Great salespeople don’t have to resort to high pressure, which is why we call what we do “selling” and not “closing.”All of the people I have heard describe themselves as a “closer” couldn’t close a door with both hands and an instructional manual. The ability to win business is inversely proportional to the individual’s willingness to describe themselves as a “closer.”Trusted. Advisor. Consultative. Salesperson.If you ask a salesperson what they aspire to be, you will hear them describe their desire to be a trusted advisor (video). You will also hear them suggest they want to be consultative.Real salespeople won’t sell something to their prospective clients if they don’t believe it will serve them. Not selling someone something isn’t right for them is how salespeople create and retain trust. Once you break that trust, your prospective client is no longer going to listen to your advice, nor should they. A professional salesperson values their relationships over the individual transaction.Those who call sales their profession don’t try to close people, nor do they try to use a one-call close (video) when it isn’t appropriate. Nor do they pressure their future clients.A real salesperson creates a preference to buy from—and work with—them by creating value for their prospective client, most of which occurs long before the potential client decides to buy. If you can’t sell effectively, the right solution is to learn to sell better, not to use manipulation, force, or pressure. If you don’t want to learn to sell effectively, you should find another line of work. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more