22 Jul

Viewpoints FDA Needs More Power To Regulate Compounding Pharmacies Time To Revamp

first_imgViewpoints: FDA Needs More Power To Regulate Compounding Pharmacies; Time To Revamp Military Benefits, Including Health This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. The Washington Post: The Crisis Of Compounding Pharmacies Traditionally, the licensing and control of pharmacies has been left to the states, but their performance has been uneven. The federal role has been thrown into question in recent years by lawsuits. … compounding pharmacies are not generally required to inform the FDA that they are in business nor to register with the FDA or disclose what products they are making. … Congress needs to give the FDA new tools and enforcement powers. Congress also needs to close a standards gap. The nation’s major pharmaceutical companies must meet Good Manufacturing Practices, a set of strict standards for the production of drugs so that consumers know that each and every dose is correctly formulated and sterile. But these do not apply to compounding pharmacies (2/13). Los Angeles Times: Covered California Previews The New Marketplace For Health Insurance You might not know it from the near-incessant fighting over the 2010 federal healthcare law, but its main provisions — the ones designed to bring coverage to millions of the uninsured — won’t go into effect until next year. State officials gave Californians their first look Wednesday at some of those changes, revealing what the out-of-pocket costs would be for a new, standardized set of insurance policies (Jon Healey, 2/13). The Wall Street Journal: Four Key Questions For Health-Care Law Thanks to the Supreme Court and Barack Obama’s re-election, the Affordable Care Act—”Obamacare” to foes and a few of its friends—isn’t going away. The issue now is how it will work. Even by Washington standards, implementing this law is extraordinarily complex. The federal government last year issued 70,000 pages of guidance, including 130 pages on the look of websites for new marketplaces where many will shop for insurance (David Wessel, 2/13). The Wall Street Journal: From SEAL Team Six To Retiring Without Health Insurance Esquire magazine’s report this week that a retired 16-year veteran of the United States military—a Navy SEAL who played a key role in the May 2011 raid that killed Osama bin Laden—now struggles without health care has become a mini cause celebre. The story is an opportune time to review how the U.S. takes care of the men and women who do so much to protect it (John Barnett and Michael O’Hanlon, 2/13). Politico: Ben Carson Vs. Obama The National Prayer Breakfast is not supposed to serve as a forum for a clash of political visions, but that was what Ben Carson made it last week. The Johns Hopkins Hospital neurosurgeon and motivational speaker lit up the event with a politically charged speech that quickly went viral. Mention “death panels” standing a few yards from the president, who is professionally obligated to sit and listen, and that tends to happen. … Warning of the disastrous effects of “moral decay” and “fiscal irresponsibility,” Carson touched on a very different approach in his speech at the prayer breakfast, advocating government frugality, a flat tax and health care accounts controlled by individuals. Carson said — not persuasively given the complexities involved — that these items are just common sense (Rich Lowry, 2/13). The Seattle Times: Painful Tales Of Mental Illness Spur Lawmakers To Action There is finally urgency in Olympia to reform mental-health care. One lawmaker after another has heard harrowing first-person accounts of scant treatment, denied at critical moments. … (Jordan Taylor-McPhail’s) story underlines the costs of our last-in-the-nation ranking for community psychiatric beds. In the last decade alone, the tally of beds certified for involuntarily committed patients dropped by a third (Jonathan Martin, 2/13). Boston Globe: A Strong Message For Beth Israel DeaconessThe settlement between Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Harvard doctor who said she endured years of sexist treatment — and punishment for complaining about it — is a hallelujah moment for working women everywhere. It took courage for Dr. Carol Warfield, the former chief of anesthesia there, to file suit against a premier teaching hospital, the chief of surgery who she said humiliated her, and the chief executive who she said ignored her complaints. It also took tenacity to press forward as the defendants tried to bury her in endless paper and pleadings (Joan Vennochi, 2/14). Oregonian: Oregon Lawmakers Eye Smoking In The Car: Agenda 2013People make a lot of bad parenting decisions. They let their kids overindulge on junk food and slip into obesity. They blow the family paycheck on video lottery games provided thoughtfully by the state of Oregon. Sometimes, they even light up a cigarette in the family SUV while Junior’s in the back seat. Parents shouldn’t do any of this stuff, of course. But should the state make bad parenting a crime? If it involves tobacco, lawmakers seem particularly inclined to say “yes” (2/13). Health Policy Solutions (a Colo. news service): Medicaid Expansions Will Help Colorado’s EconomyWhen the Colorado Health Foundation commissioned my team to study the economic and budgetary impacts of expanding eligibility for the Medicaid program, we looked at the issue objectively through a dollars-and-cents lens. … The results of our analysis, highlighted in the just-released Colorado Health Foundation report, “Medicaid Expansion: Examining the Impact on Colorado’s Economy,” show that the Colorado economy will grow more with Medicaid expansion than without it. In short, expansion will have a net positive impact on the Colorado economy (Charles Brown, 2/13).last_img read more

22 Jul

Putting The Health Law Puzzle Pieces Together And Making Sense Of It

first_imgNews organizations help make sense of all the different moving parts of the health law — attitudes, concerns, lawsuits and business decisions — as the nation gears up for Oct. 1’s launch of the health insurance exchanges.Philly.com: Sorting Out Obamacare Facts From FictionWe’ve been batting down bogus claims about the Affordable Care Act for years, since 2009, when legislation was still in the debate stage. But they’ve been increasing in intensity in recent months as we approach Oct. 1, the date the insurance exchanges will be open for business for those buying their own insurance, mainly with the help of federal subsidies. So, more than three years after our last health-care-whoppers piece (published just before the law was signed in 2010), we’re giving readers a rundown of the top claims (Robertson, 9/17).Minnesota Public Radio: ‘Obamacare’ Or ‘Affordable Care Act’?What’s in a name? Everything when it comes to polling about the health care law, officially known as the Affordable Care Act. In a new Fox News poll, 55 percent of those surveyed held an unfavorable view of the new law when the pollster referred to it as the Affordable Care Act. But when the name was replaced by “Obamacare,” the negative opinion increased to 60 percent. Seventy-five percent of Republicans viewed the Affordable Care Act unfavorably — that jumped to 83 percent when “Obamacare” was used (Collins, 9/17).The New York Times: Concern Over Drug CostsAmong the most troubling questions facing consumers as they shop for insurance under the Obama administration’s new health care law is whether the plans will cover the drugs they take — and how much they will have to pay for them. But with less than two weeks remaining until enrollment opens on Oct. 1, the answers are still elusive and anxiety is growing for consumers whose well-being depends on expensive medications (Thomas, 9/17).Kaiser Health News: A Guide To The Lawsuits Challenging Obamacare’s Contraception Coverage RequirementsEven with so much attention focused on the Oct. 1 launch of the health law’s state insurance exchanges, one of the Affordable Care Act’s most controversial elements is still percolating through the nation’s legal system (9/17).The New York Times: Reaping Profit After Assisting On Health LawWashington’s health care revolving door is spinning fast as the new online health insurance marketplaces, a central provision of President Obama’s health care law, are set to open Oct. 1. Those who had a hand in the law’s passage are now finding lucrative work in the private sector, as businesses try to understand the complex measure, reshape it by pressing for regulatory changes — or profit from it (Stolberg, 9/17). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Putting The Health Law Puzzle Pieces Together, And Making Sense Of Itlast_img read more

22 Jul

Having Dedicated Hospital Space For Caregivers Actually Makes Economic Sense And Facilities

first_imgHaving Dedicated Hospital Space For Caregivers Actually Makes Economic Sense, And Facilities Are Starting To Listen Under the health law, there are penalties on hospitals for avoidable readmissions. Providing support for family caregivers could help keep patients from having to come back to the facility. Meanwhile, some hospitals are revamping to become more energy efficient, and they’re saving millions. Modern Healthcare: Few Hospitals Dedicate Space For Family Caregivers, But That Could Change  Kaiser Health News: Energy-Hog Hospitals: When They Start Thinking Green, They See Green Hospitals are energy hogs. With their 24/7 lighting, heating and water needs, they use up to five times more energy than a fancy hotel. Executives at some systems view their facilities like hotel managers, adding amenities, upscale new lobbies and larger parking garages in an effort to attract patients and increase revenue. But some hospitals are revamping with a different goal in mind: becoming more energy-efficient, which can also boost the bottom line. (Appleby, 8/16) In other news — Modern Healthcare: Young Nurses Seek Advanced Degrees, Leaving Gaps In Direct Patient Care  This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. More young nurses are opting to obtain advanced degrees, which could help fill gaps in primary care. But it could also take them away from the patient’s bedside. Nearly half of millennial nurses (ages 19-36), 35% of those in Generation X (ages 37-53), and 12% of baby boomers (ages 54-71) plan to become advanced-practice nurses, according to AMN Healthcare, a healthcare staffing agency that polled nearly 3,400 nurses in April 2017. (Kacik, 8/15) Dedicated spaces for family caregivers are rare. Fewer than 20 acute-care hospitals have them, according to experts in the field, and Burke says theirs, which opened in June, is the first such caregiver center inside a rehab hospital. Even so, caregiver advocates believe several factors are coming together to convince hospitals such investments make economic sense even as margins are increasingly crunched. The Affordable Care Act put in place penalties for avoidable readmissions, which caregivers can help prevent, and some encouraging programs are cropping up to pay caregivers for their work. (Bannow, 8/15) last_img read more

22 Jul

The Witcher 3 will only run at 540p on Nintendo Switch in

first_imgThe Witcher 3: Wild Hunt was finally confirmed for the Nintendo Switch during the Nintendo E3 2019 Direct presentation. The game will be a ‘complete edition’, meaning that players will be granted access to the main game as well as to the expansion packs – Hearts of Stone and Blood and Wine – that came out following its release.There’s a massive caveat with this port though, with the trailer showing that the Witcher 3’s visuals have suffered a significant downgrade in order to get the massive open-world game running on the Switch.CD Projekt Red confirmed via Twitter that the game will only run at 540p in handheld mode, which is a significant drop in quality from the PS4 and Xbox One versions. That said, you will supposedly see 720p visuals with Dynamic Resolution enabled on the Nintendo Switch when the hybrid console is docked and hooked up to a TV.Related: E3 2019 540p handheld, 720p, with dynamic resolution enabled, on screen.— The Witcher (@witchergame) June 11, 2019It will be interesting to see how the Witcher 3 actually performs on the Nintendo Switch, as while the visual downgrade may be tolerable, any dips in frame rates or a choppy performance could well be a deal breaker. We do have faith in CD Projekt Red that this won’t be the case though.CD Projekt Red also confirmed the Witcher 3’s file size will be roughly 32GB, which is the same as the default storage of the Nintendo Switch. This won’t be a problem if you buy the cartridge, as then you won’t need any additional downloads. But if you’re looking to buy a digital copy of the Witcher 3, you’ll definitely want to upgrade the storage with a microSD card.Read our review of The Witcher 3: Wild HuntIn our review of the third game in The Witcher series, we couldn’t praise the game enough: ‘It still has the classic hook of every RPG – fighting monsters to gain experience and loot to level up and upgrade to make you even better at fighting monsters – but it has other pleasures too, with incredible scope for exploration and quests that are well-scripted, varied and full of personality’.The Witcher 3 is not the only game to cross over and find a new home on Nintendo’s portable console – Skyrim, LA Noire, Dark Souls, Diablo 3 and Dragon’s Dogma have all made the switch in recent years.The Witcher 3 is expected to arrive on the Nintendo Switch later this year. The game is available now on Xbox One, PS4 and PC. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.center_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend. We use industry standard tests to evaluate products in order to assess them properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. Trusted Reviews may get a commission if you buy through our links. Tell us what you think.last_img read more

21 Jul

Porsche Dealers Gear Up For Electric Cars

Porsche dealers are faced with high short-term financial investments into the charging infrastructureWhen Porsche decided to enter the electric vehicle world, they sure paid attention to every detail. As their investments towards electrification garner speed, the German carmaker is entering a stage where not only the vehicle itself but also, the infrastructure will play a key ingredient in their overall success. Hence, Porsche authorized dealers, and especially those ones in the United States will have to shoulder a significant share of the company’s investment plans.More from Porsche Porsche Explains Production Process For Electric Taycan Porsche Taycan Sport Turismo Wagon Spied For First Time Source: Electric Vehicle News Porsche Mission E Cross Turismo Gets Production Green Light Just recently, Porsche bumped up the number of high-speed chargers it deems necessary to more than 700, or about 40 percent more than previously estimated. And Porsche’s U.S dealers will have to cough up the investment for at least 200 of those. And just like the cars they sell, this investment will be a costly one for the 190-store brand. According to recent info revealed by the Zuffenhausen based carmaker, the chargers will cost retailers between $300,000 and $400,000 per store on average.However, time is scarce as the planned U.S. arrival of the Taycan – Porsche’s first electric sedan – is set for 2020, just over a year from now. And judging by the most recent developments and information coming from the carmaker, Porsche is clearly embracing electrification. And there’s no better sign of that than more than €6 billion ($6.9 billion) the company intends to spend on vehicle electrification by 2022.“We expect by 2025, roughly 50 percent of our products to be electrified, either with a fully electric engine or with a plug-in hybrid,” Porsche sales chief Detlev von Platen told Automotive News.And for Porsche dealers in the U.S., that means they’ll have to get busy installing electric vehicle chargers. However, even Porsche Cars North America CEO Klaus Zellmer concedes that this will be a huge financial undertaking for the retailers, who will be faced with a prolonged payoff of the investment. However risky, it may be one of the most financially sound decisions they will ever make. After all, high-performance machines from Porsche are already a highly coveted item, let alone the planned onslaught of potential EVs from the carmaker set to arrive in the future.“It’s typical, if you’re an entrepreneur, that the investment doesn’t pay off within the first one-two-three years,” Zellmer told Automotive News last month at Porsche’s Rennsport Reunion motorsports event here. “It’s a long-term investment – he added. You need to establish the tech prerequisites to show what the car can do, which first for customers is charging,” he said.In the end, it’s a necessary investment. Porsche’s ambitious electrical plan hinges on the availability of robust and fast charging infrastructure, set to alleviate range anxiety. After all, the fear of running out of juice and the inconvenient lengthy charge times have been major hurdles to widespread EV adoption. If Porsche can tackle those successfully, the carmaker could find itself in a fruitful market position. The retailers playing ball is key to their success, however financially painful (in the short term) the investment may be for them.Source: Autonews Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 20, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

21 Jul

Seat Presents An Inside Look At The Cupra eRacer

first_img SEAT Electric Car Uses 440 LBS of Dry Ice Daily The Cupra e-Racer under multimedia x-rayCupra, the new Seat‘s brand, takes us on a journey deep inside the e-Racer, which is the world’s first fully electric competition touring car, unveiled earlier this year. The first races are planned for 2020 under new ETCR Racing format.The 3D animation and multimedia x-ray presents four-motor beast with 500 kW of power, which can do 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds and would be one of the fastest EV on the race track. The motors and inverters are placed between rear wheels:CUPRA e-Racer Cupra news Cupra e-Racer – A Proper Electric Racing Car In Geneva Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 22, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News The battery consist 6,072 cylindrical cells and is big enough for 40 km (25 miles) of driving at full performances: Cupra e-Racer– A 450 kg battery, the core element: It accounts for a third of the vehicle’s total weight and is a challenge when developing this model, as explained by the head of engineering at CUPRA, Xavier Serra: “The battery determines the entire design and position of the remaining elements”. It is located “as low as possible so that the centre of gravity is closer to the ground and enhances the car’s dynamics”, he points out. This part is made up of 23 panels with a total of 6,072 battery cells, generating the same power as 9,000 mobile phones connected at the same time.center_img Source: Electric Vehicle News SEAT Confirms E TCR Racing Series Intention With CUPRA e-Racer Cupra e-Racer specsfour electric motors (300 kW continuous and 500 kW peak) but rear-wheel drive only0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 3.2 seconds0-125 mph (200 km/h) in 8.2 seconds168 mph (270 km/h) top speedrange at full performances: 40 km (25 miles)40 minute recharge6,072 battery cellsbattery pack weight: 450 kgtotal weight: 1575 kgHere is video from tests at the race track:.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } 14 photos – No energy is lost; it is transformed: This car features an energy recovery system that harnesses energy from braking and decelerating. The steering wheel of the CUPRA e-Racer has a display panel that the driver and engineers can monitor and transfer a full range of vehicle performance data in real time while driving for efficient energy management.– Temperature control: On the track, the technical team and the driver himself must know how to manage the temperature of the components. This car is equipped with a bespoke cooling system in the radiator, which provides cooling in around 20 minutes. “There are three independent cooling circuits, as each element has different temperature limits:  the battery threshold is 60 °C, the inverters 90 °C, and the engines 120 °C”, points out Xavier Serra.last_img read more

21 Jul

NIO Founder Pours Own Money Into Automaker To Show Support

first_imgIncluding 189,253 A shares and 49,810,747 C shares, the trust fund is created to deepen the connection between users and NIO, which is in correspondence with the company’s original aspiration to be a user-focused enterprise.Li Bin will still retain the right to vote over the transferred shares and he is going to further discuss with NIO’s users about the operation mechanism of the trust fund.As one of most well-know EV startups in China, NIO takes the lead in both mass-produced vehicle delivery and financing progress.NIO has so far released two volume production models. The first model ES8, hitting the market at NIO Day 2017, saw its deliveries amount to 11,348 units by the end of 2018. In addition, the world premiere of the ES6 high-performance long-range electric SUV, NIO’s second model, held at the NIO Day 2018.According to reports issued a few days ago, the startup’s third model will be a sedan dubbed “EP7”.On September 12, 2018, NIO went public on the New York stock exchange, the first Chinese electric vehicle startup listed in the U.S.Source: Gasgoo NIO’s 3rd Electric Vehicle Rumored To Be EP7 Sedan Put your money where your month is.Li Bin, founder, chairman and CEO of China-based EV startup NIO, transfers 50 million shares registered under his name as the capital of a trust fund built for NIO’s users, the startup announced on January 24.More China News NIO ES6 Electric Crossover Specs, Images & Video From World Debut Source: Electric Vehicle News NIO Sold Record 3,318 ES8 Electric SUVs In December Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 29, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

21 Jul

Jaguar IPACE Accounts For Almost 6 Of Jaguar Sales In US

first_img Tesla Model 3, S, X March 2019 U.S. Sales Estimates: Final Source: Electric Vehicle News 1,000 sold in U.S.In March, Jaguar sold in the U.S. 212 Jaguar I-PACE, which isover 5.7% of its total result of 3,679 (by the way, up 13% or 419 units year-over-year). Sales during the first quarter amounted to 608, while cumulatively the total is now 1,001.Comparing the Jaguar I-PACE to Tesla Model X and Tesla Model S, it turns out that sales are more than an order of magnitude lower than in case of Tesla models (each of them), despite the fact that the S/X had lower results than in its best years. It prompts us to ask whether the I-PACE or other new BEVs like the upcoming Audi e-tron will be able to match Tesla at some point in the future?U.S. sales March 2019 U.S. EV Sales Continue The Trend, Barely Exceeding 2018 Toyota Prius Prime Plug-In Outsells Honda Clarity PHEV To Capture Sales Crown Jaguar I-PACE sales in U.S. – March 2019Tesla Model X sales in U.S. – March 2019 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 7, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

21 Jul

Tesla Model 3 becomes bestselling car in Switzerland – not just electric

first_imgTesla Model 3 became the best-selling car in Switzerland last month – beating not just other electric vehicles, but all passenger vehicles period. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVp0Cr2Pg4gThe post Tesla Model 3 becomes best-selling car in Switzerland – not just electric appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

20 Jul

What Are the Best Books on Aging

first_imgby, Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.orgTweet26Share143Share3Email172 SharesI hope folks are enjoying ChangingAging’s new design and features. Our Submissions Page is now live and ready to accept guestblog submissions, Journey stories and your Questions. I’m going to kick things off with a question of my own that I hope the ChangingAging community can help me with.This week I received a guestblog submission from a wonderful ChangingAging reader who is writing a book on graceful aging and submitted a post listing her Top 15 Books on Aging. I was so excited to receive one of our first submissions that it was truly upsetting when I realized I had to reject it.The description of her book on graceful aging sounded wonderful, with a great focus on the positive aspects of aging, meaningful living and legacy. However, when I took a look at her top 15 books I realized that every book on her list was about life extension, anti-aging strategies and longevity.Now, several of her picks are great books, such as aging-guru Robert N. Butler’s “The Longevity Prescription: The 8 Proven Keys to a Long, Healthy Life,” or “The Blue Zones: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest” by Dan Buettner. But the bulk of the list are books I would only post on ChangingAging to criticize for their obsession with superficial youth, such as Ageless Face, Ageless Mind: Erase Wrinkles and Rejuvenate the Brain by Dr. Nicholas Perricone or the dubious RealAge: Are You as Young as You Can Be?, part of the RealAge.com website that operates as a front for the Pharmaceutical Industry to collect consumer information (with backing by Oprah and Dr. Oz).I emailed the reader explaining my thoughts and asked for her feedback (I’m waiting for a reply).  I explained that our mission at ChangingAging is to counter society’s obsession and worshiping of youth. We believe this obsession with youth has many negative consequences on society, one of which is that the worth of people is largely determined by their apparent youthfulness. Rather than focus on how to “retain youth”, we are trying to change the way society views aging to become more accepting of old age and more open to the positive attributes of aging.Which leads to my two-part question:1) Do you think I did the right thing rejecting this guest post?2) What are the best Pro-Aging books that we should be featuring on ChangingAging? We’ve been compiling a Top 50 Pro-Aging book list and would love to hear what you’re reading. Take a look below and let us know what we’re missing — we have a few slots open.Abrahams, Ruby, At the End of the DayButler, Robert, N, Why Survive?: Being Old in AmericaButler, Robert, N, The Longevity Revolution: The Benefits and Challenges of Living a Long LifeChittister, Joan, The Gift of Years: Growing Older GracefullyCohen, Gene, D., The Creative Age: Awakening Human Potential In The Second Half Of LifeCohen, Gene, D., The Mature Mind: The Positive Power of the Aging BrainDass, Ram, Still Here: Embracing Aging, Changing, and DyingFischer, Kathleen, Winter Grace: Spirituality and AgingFreedman, Marc, The Big Shift: Navigating the New Stage Beyond MidlifeFriedan, Betty, The Fountain of AgeFry, Prem, S., Keyes, Corey L.M., New Frontiers in Resilient Aging: Life-Strengths and Well-Being in Late LifeGraydon, Shari, I Feel Great About By Hands: And Other Unexpected Joys of AgingGreen, Brent, Generation ReinventionGrossman, I.Michael, Coming to Terms with AgingHanson, Amy, Baby Boomers and Beyond: Tapping the Ministry Talents and Passions of Adults over 50Heilbrun, Carolyn G., The Last Gift of Time:Life Beyond SixtyHill, Robert D, Seven Strategies for Positive AgingHurd, Clarke, Laura, Facing Age: Women Growing Older in Anti-Aging CultureJackman, Elspeth, Enjoying Later Life (Making a Difference)Lustbader,MSW, Wendy, Life Gets BetterMartz, Sandra, Grow Old Along with Me, The Best Is Yet to BeMatzkin, Alice, The Art of Aging: Celebrating the Authentic Aging SelfMoody, PhD,Harry and Carroll, David, The Five Stages of the Soul: Charting the Spiritual Passages That Shape Our LivesMoody, Harry PhD and Sasser, Jennifer, Aging: Concepts and ControversiesMorgan, PhD, Leslie A., and Kunkel PhD, Suzanne R., Society, and the Life Course, Fourth EditionMorganroth Gullette, Margaret, Agewise: Fighting the New Ageism in AmericaMorganroth, Gullette, Margaret, Aged by CultureNelson, Todd D., Ageism: Stereotyping and Prejudice against Older PersonsNouwen, Henri, J.M., Gaffney, Walter, J Aging: The Fulfillment of LifePlotkin, Bill, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented WorldPowell, Jason, Gilbert, Tony, Aging Identity: A Dialogue with PostmodernismReid, Eve, Fearless Aging: A Journey of Self Discovery, Soul Work and EmpowermentRich, Cynthia, MacDonald, Barbara, Look Me in the Eye: Old Women, Aging and AgeismRichmond, Lewis, Aging as a Spiritual Practice: A Contemplative Guide to Growing Older and WiserRohr, Richard, Falling Upward:A Spirituality for the Two Halves of LifeSarton, May, As We Are NowSarton, May, Encore: A Journal of the Eightieth YearSchachter-Shalomi, Zalman, Miller, Ronald, Age-ing to Sage-ingThomas, William H M.D., What Are Old People ForThomas, William H M.D., In The Arms of EldersThomason, Sally Palmer, Living Spirit of the Crone: Turning Aging Inside OutWalker, Smith, J. and Clurman, Ann, Generation Ageless: How Baby Boomers Are Changing the Way We Live Today….And They’re Just Getting StartedWeintraub, Arlene, Selling the Fountain of Youth: How the Anti-Aging Industry Made a Disease Out of Getting Old-And Made BillionsWilliamson, Marianne, The Age of Miracles: Embracing the New MidlifeRelated PostsChangingAging Books: The Wonder of AgingWhen I received a copy of Michael Gurian’s new book “The Wonder of Aging: A New Approach to Embracing Life After Fifty” I could tell this was a changing aging book.ChangingAging Weekly Blog RoundupIt Starts Here — Announcing the ChangingAging Blogstream The mass media is the most ageist element of our society — it will not help us change aging. There is an alternative option to get our story out. It’s BIG. It’s powerful. It’s under our control. It’s called Social Media. One…This is the Changing Aging Book of the YearWendy Lustbader is one of America’s finest and most illuminating writers. Equally passionate as a writer, teacher, and therapist, Wendy brings a social worker’s lived experience to her writing, teaching, and service to older people. Indeed it is her long experience with and concern for the well being of older…Tweet26Share143Share3Email172 SharesTags: Anti-Aging books Dr. Oz oprah Pro-Aginglast_img read more

20 Jul

Minka the AirBnB

first_imgby, Kyrié Carpenter, Managing EditorTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesNestled into the shore of Lake Cayuga in Upstate New York sits the very first Minka.The Minka prototype was created for Haleigh Jane Thomas. Haleigh is now graciously sharing her Minka through Airbnb. Any Tribes of Eden fans out there? This is your chance to be hosted by the amazing, Jude Meyers Thomas. The real-life version of Jude lives up to and surpasses her namesake character. Her immense gift for hospitality and kindness radiate when you are with her. Jude is the heart of the Thomas family innovations. It all started with The Eden Alternative, then GreenHouse and now Minka.When asked why to put Haleigh’s Minka on AirBnB Jude replied,“Minka should be out there for everyone to share. I believe Haleigh Jane believes in Minka and wants to help her family get this business off the ground, by showing the world what a home for people of all ages and abilities looks like.”The fun part, said Jude, is that the first guests were perfect guinea pigs. They knew nothing about the Minka or Haleigh Jane’s story before booking a visit. They found the Minka on Airbnb. The first guests knew nothing of the philosophy or history of Minka. For them, it was a lovely place to stay on the lake that met their needs. The experiences so far have been “amazing!” Jude said.“I have always loved meeting new people and learning people’s story,” Jude shared. “I love seeing people’s reaction to the Minka. Everyone who has come has been in awe of the space and the Minka itself. I keep hearing people say ‘everything we need is right here’. It is a very positive affirmation about the work we have done.”The beauty of universal design is that it fits everyone. This Minka was made for Haleigh and her specific lifestyle and needs. It suits the needs of those she is sharing it with thanks to Universal Design.Who should come and stay at Haleigh’s Minka? “Anyone and everyone!” Jude exclaimed. “It is open to all people of varying ages, different abilities and all walks of life. All are welcome and encouraged to come. I especially encourage those who are playing around with the idea, ‘I want to simplify my life.” Come, stay and live out the dream. See if it fits.”Minka is a tool to create a community that is MAGIC-al ( Multi-Ability, multi-Generational, Inclusive, Community). The first Minka is doing this through being a get-away for Haleigh and Airbnb guests. Each Minka will have its own story. Each Minka will have a way it contributes to bringing about the world the Thomas family have been working for decades to manifest. How will your Minka be a part of this story? Book a stay now or reserve your spot in the production queue and start dreaming.Related PostsThe Minka Factory Opens Its DoorsJust outside of Ithaca, New York in a newly constructed warehouse. Sandwiched between a local solar company and a Lime Bike depot is another innovative and earth-friendly neighbor. The very first Minka factory rolled open it’s doors earlier this month. Zach Thomas, Director of Manufacturing and master builder Jeremy Andrews…Minka MAGIC Homes and CommunitiesNationally renowned aging expert Dr. Bill Thomas unveiled today the first-of-its-kind robotic prefabricated Minka house built on the University of Southern Indiana (USI) campus in less than a week featuring universal design accessibility and advanced manufacturing technology.Grateful Changemakers: ChangingAgingAll of ChangingAging’s performances, all of our advocacy, all of our innovation is driven at its core by love. Love is the driving force behind combating ageism.TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: Airbnb jude Minkalast_img read more

20 Jul

Early childhood adversity increases sensitivity of the bodys immune response to cocaine

first_imgJul 17 2018Childhood adversity permanently alters the peripheral and central immune systems, increasing the sensitivity of the body’s immune response to cocaine, reports a study by researchers at the IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation and University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Italy.The study, published in Biological Psychiatry, showed that exposure to psychosocial stress early in life altered the structure of immune cells and inflammatory signals in mice and led to increased drug-seeking behavior. Exposure to early psychosocial stress in mice, or a difficult childhood in humans, increased the immune response to cocaine in adulthood, revealing a shared mechanism in the role of immune response in the effects of early life stress on cocaine sensitivity in mice and humans.The findings help explain why as many as 50 percent of people who experience childhood maltreatment develop addiction problems. The results in mice and humans suggest that exposure to adversity during childhood triggers activation of the immune system, leading to permanent changes that sensitize the immune system and increase susceptibility to the effects of cocaine in adulthood.”This paper suggests the existence of an extraordinary degree of interplay between the neural and immune systems related to the impact of early life stress on later risk for cocaine misuse. It both highlights the complex impact of early life stress and suggests an immune-related mechanism for reducing later addiction risk,” said John Krystal, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.After inducing psychosocial stress in 2-week-old mice by exposing them to a threatening male, first author Luisa Lo Iacono, PhD, and colleagues examined brain immune cells, called microglia, in adulthood. Early social stress altered the structure of microglia in the ventral tegmental area, a brain region important for the reward system and drug-seeking, and increased the response of microglia to cocaine. In the peripheral immune system, early social stress increased the release of inflammatory molecules from white blood cells, which was further amplified by exposure to cocaine, compared with control mice.Related StoriesAntibiotics can wipe out early flu resistance, study findsE-cigarettes much more effective for traditional cigarettes finds studyVirus employs powerful strategy to inhibit natural killer cell function”Remarkably, pharmacologically blocking this immune activation during early life stress prevents the development of the susceptibility to cocaine in adulthood,” said senior author Valeria Carola, PhD. Mice who received an antibiotic to prevent activation of immune cells during social stress did not have cellular changes or drug-seeking behavior.The study also compared immune system function of 38 cocaine addicts and 20 healthy volunteers. Those who experienced childhood maltreatment had increased expression levels of genes important for immune system function. And the highest levels were found in cocaine addicts who had experienced a difficult childhood.The findings add to the growing collection of evidence from the research group for the negative effects of early life trauma on brain development. “Our work emphasizes once again the importance of the emotional environment where our children are raised and how much a serene and stimulating environment can provide them with an extra ‘weapon’ against the development of psychopathologies,” said Dr. Carola. Source:https://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

20 Jul

Study Neural signal that urges to eat overpowers the one that says

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 21 2018Almost everyone knows the feeling. You’re at a restaurant or a holiday meal, and your stomach is telling you it’s full, so logically you know you should stop eating.But what you’re eating tastes so good, or your friends and family are still eating, or you don’t get this treat very often. So you keep going.A new study explores the mystery of why this happens, at the most basic level in the brain. It shows that two tiny clusters of cells battle for control of feeding behavior — and the one that drives eating overpowers the one that says to stop.It also shows that the brain’s own natural opioid system gets involved – and that blocking it with the drug naloxone can stop over-eating.The researchers studied mice, not over-eating humans. But they do note that the findings could help inform the fight against the global obesity epidemic.The team, from the University of Michigan Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, published their work in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.The two groups of brain cells they looked at, called POMC and AgRP, are next-door neighbors in a deep brain region called the arcuate nucleus, or Arc, within a larger region called the hypothalamus, which is a master regulator of motivated behaviors.Neuroscientist and U-M Department of Psychiatry professor Huda Akil, Ph.D., led the research team. She says the discovery involved a strong dose of serendipity.”We used a transgenic approach to specifically address the POMC neurons for optogenetic stimulation, and we expected to see a decrease in appetite. Instead, we saw a really remarkable effect,” she says. “The animals ate like crazy; during the half hour after stimulation, they ate a full day’s supply of food.”A tale of two genesPrevious research, including work done in several U-M laboratories, showed that the Arc region, and specifically POMC and AgRP neurons, play key roles in feeding behavior.The gene called POMC (short for pro-opiomelanocortin) has multiple functions: it encodes a stress hormone called ACTH, a natural opioid called beta-endoprhin, and several other molecules called melanocortins.The first mammalian gene to be cloned, it was also the first gene that scientists visualized in the brain of a mammal using a technique called in situ hybridization – work that was led by Stan Watson, M.D., Ph.D., who also co-authored the new paper. Another U-M researcher, Roger Cone, Ph.D., first cloned the receptors for POMC-produced melanocortins, and demonstrated their role in food intake, energy regulation and obesity.POMC’s products get opposition from products of the AgRP gene, whose name is short for Agouti-Gene-Related Peptide. Watson also mapped the location of AgRP cells in the brain, and Cone’s team determined their role in feeding and obesity.In general, POMC acts like a brake on feeding when it gets certain signals from the body, and AgRP acts like an accelerator pedal, especially when food is scarce or it’s been some time since a meal.But the new study shows for the first time how their activity relates to one another, thanks to a technique called optogenetics. By focusing on unique molecular features of a particular group of neurons, it makes it possible for scientists to target, or address, those cells specifically and activate them selectively.A hunt for answersThe serendipitous optogenetic finding about the over-eating mice set off a search for the reason why they overate, led by research scientist Qiang Wei, Ph.D., working with others in Akil’s lab.The answer was that while they were optogenetically stimulating the POMC cells, they were also unintentionally stimulating a subset of AgRP cells nearby. The two types of cells originate from the same parent cells during embryonic development. That common heritage meant that the transgenic approach Akil and her colleagues used to address POMC captured not only the POMC neurons but also a segment of the AgRP neuronal system.Related StoriesNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellIn other words, they had turned on both the brake and the gas pedal for eating. When both types of cell got activated, the “keep eating” signal from AgRP cells overpowered the “stop eating” signal from POMC cells. “When both are stimulated at once, AgRP steals the show,” says Akil.Then the researchers used a different technique, addressing the cells with an injected virus rather than a transgene, to focus the optogenetic stimulation on just POMC neurons and ensure that AgRP neurons didn’t get activated.They found that stimulating just POMC cells caused a significant decrease in eating – and were surprised at how rapidly it happened. Akil notes that past research had shown slow effects of POMC stimulation on eating – but in these previous experiments, mice had recently eaten, while the mice in the U-M study were slightly hungry.The team also used a new method called CLARITY to visualize in 3-D the pathways that start from POMC and AgRP neurons. These pathways of neurons, once activated, can trigger either a sense of feeling full – called satiety — or the drive to eat. They stitched together images of activated neurons in a computer, to create 3-D videos that show the neurons’ reach.Then, the researchers used a method called c-fos activation to dig deeper into the downstream effects of POMC and AgRP neuron activation – and showed that its effects spread throughout the brain, including in the cortex, which governs function like attention, perception, and memory.Since POMC encodes a natural opioid (B-Endorphin), the authors asked whether activation of this system triggers the body’s own natural painkiller system, called the endogenous opioid system. They found that activation of POMC blocked pain, but that this was reversed by the opioid antagonist drug naloxone.Interestingly, the activation of AgRP, which triggered feeding, also turned on the opioid system in the brain. “When we administered naloxone, which blocks opioid receptors, the feeding behavior stopped,” says Akil. “This suggests that the brain’s own endogenous opioid system may play a role in wanting to eat beyond what is needed.”More than just metabolic signalsThe involvement of the cortex and opioid systems lead Akil and her colleagues to think about how the results might relate to the human experience. Though mice and humans are very different, Akil speculates that the bombardment of our senses with sights and smells related to food, and the social interactions related to food, may be involved in encouraging overeating.Perhaps, she says, these factors combine to trigger us to become interested in eating when we’re not even hungry, and the battle between the “stop” and “keep going” signals is lost.”Our work shows that the signals of satiety – of having had enough food – are not powerful enough to work against the strong drive to eat, which has strong evolutionary value,” she says. She notes that other researchers are looking at opiate receptor blockers as potential diet aids, and that it’s also important to study the pathways that are activated by the products of both POMC and AgRP cells, as well as individual differences in all these systems.Many studies in humans have looked at the metabolic aspects of the drive to eat, and overeat – for instance, the metabolic signals that travel between the body and brain in the form of peptides such as leptin and ghrelin. But Akil says there appears to be a strong neural system involved in overeating that results from perceptual, emotional and social triggers, and that is not receiving sufficient scientific attention.”There’s a whole industry built on enticing you to eat, whether you need it or not, through visual cues, packaging, smells, emotional associations,” she says. “People get hungry just looking at them, and we need to study the neural signals involved in those attentional, perceptional mechanisms that drive us to eat.” Source:http://www.med.umich.edu/last_img read more

20 Jul

Seedy tale Chinese researchers stole patented corn US prosecutors allege

Email FBI agents tracked the group for about a year, according to court documents, eventually indicting the alleged ringleader, Mo Hailong, and five partners this past December. Last week, U.S. prosecutors arrested and charged another suspect in the case. Mo Yun, a researcher with a “PhD in an animal science field,” according to court records, heads up DBN’s research and technology division in Beijing. All seven defendants have been charged with being part of a conspiracy to steal trade secrets.  Mo Yun is the wife of DBN Chair Shao Genhuo and the sister of alleged ringleader Mo Hailong. Her arrest suggests that agents have traced the operation back to the scientists in China who would have handled any seed lines obtained from the United States. Mo Yun, who oversaw DBN’s seed breeding efforts in China, was “in charge of the specifics from the home country side,” DBN’s chief operating officer wrote in an instant message to Mo Hailong that was intercepted by FBI agents.The germplasm, or genetic makeup, of corn lines is a valuable form of intellectual property and is carefully guarded by seed companies. Through extensive research, breeders develop inbred seed lines that have particular traits. They can then be crossbred with other inbred lines to create hybrid lines that are sold to farmers.In China, Mo Yun and her colleagues operated in an atmosphere that works against the homegrown development of such seed lines, say observers of China’s agricultural research programs. China’s plant breeding research is mainly conducted in the public sector, and researchers are not always in close contact with the companies that sell and trade seeds. Less money is available for the private sector, says Huang Jikun, director of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy in Beijing. “The current institutional setting and incentive system” is a barrier to innovation, he notes.Plant breeding research elsewhere in the world has benefited from advances in genomics and molecular markers, but plant breeding scientists in China do not work closely with researchers in those areas, says Carl Pray, an agriculture, food, and resource economics expert at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, who has worked in China. “Only a few private Chinese companies have developed major biotech and plant breeding research capacities,” he adds. Rather than labor in an atmosphere stymied by poor investment, fragmented research groups, and weak intellectual property protection, the defendants may have seen obtaining patented seed lines as a shortcut. The United States has a climate and crop growing conditions that are similar to China’s, making it a “natural place to look,” Pray says.In 2012, a court document alleges, Mo Hailong and two other defendants “attempted to ship approximately 250 pounds of corn seed, packaged in 42, 5-gallon zip-lock bags contained in 5 separate boxes,” from Illinois to a logistics company in Hong Kong. Another defendant is said to have stashed “374 small manila envelopes each containing small quantities of corn seed within two boxes of Pop Weaver brand microwave popcorn,” which he stowed in his checked luggage on a flight to Beijing.Mo Yun, who would have overseen efforts to ascertain the germplasm of any stolen seed lines in Beijing, allegedly participated from behind the scenes. Agents intercepted instant messaging chats in which she and her brother discussed which seeds to collect.Later, she told her brother that some of the seeds he had sent were performing well. She added that a DBN scientist had been asked to test the DNA of the seed lines deemed most promising, according to court documents.DuPont Pioneer has developed a popular corn line in China in partnership with a Chinese company. But because of the Chinese government’s concern about foreign control of China’s seed industry, Pray says, officials have allowed the company to commercialize only one hybrid cultivar. Those tight controls mean that little of the company’s intellectual property finds its way into China. Pray says “it could be that if the Chinese government was not so effective at keeping out U.S. companies and U.S. maize lines, [Mo Yun] and her brother could have taken these lines from DuPont in China rather than violating U.S. law and taking U.S. trade secrets from the U.S.”Mo Hailong and several other defendants have entered not guilty pleas. Attorneys for the accused could not be reached for comment. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The court documents read like something out of a Coen brothers film. Employees of the Chinese agricultural company Dabeinong Technology Group Co. (DBN) and a subsidiary sneaked through midwestern cornfields, U.S. prosecutors allege, stealthily gathering patented corn that they attempted to smuggle out of the United States in microwave popcorn boxes. Over a span of years, the associates allegedly came up with various ways of stealing coveted seed lines developed by agricultural giants DuPont Pioneer, Monsanto, and LG Seeds—a feat that, had it succeeded, would have sidestepped years of research. The case is remarkable in its scope. Experts on Chinese agriculture say that it also reflects real obstacles to innovation within China.The U.S.-based defendants roamed rural Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa in rental cars, digging up corn seedlings, stealing ears of corn, and stealing or illegally obtaining packaged seed, according to court documents. In 2011, a DuPont Pioneer field manager spotted one alleged thief on his knees digging in a field, as a collaborator waited in a nearby parked car. The defendants stored hundreds of ears of corn in a storage locker, where a manager warned them that their stash might attract rodents. They eventually purchased 13 hectares of Iowa farmland in an apparent attempt to conceal their activities. Click to view the privacy policy. 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20 Jul

Anonymous peerreview comments may spark legal battle

first_imgThe power of anonymous comments—and the liability of those who make them—is at the heart of a possible legal battle embroiling PubPeer, an online forum launched in October 2012 for anonymous, postpublication peer review. A researcher who claims that comments on PubPeer caused him to lose a tenured faculty job offer now intends to press legal charges against the person or people behind these posts—provided he can uncover their identities, his lawyer says. The issue first came to light in August, when PubPeer’s (anonymous) moderators announced that the site had received a “legal threat.” Today, they revealed that the scientist involved is Fazlul Sarkar, a cancer researcher at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Sarkar, an author on more than 500 papers and principal investigator for more than $1,227,000 in active grants from the U.S. National Institutes of Health, has, like many scientists, had his work scrutinized on PubPeer. More than 50 papers on which he is an author have received at least one comment from PubPeer users, many of whom point out potential inconsistencies in the papers’ figures, such as perceived similarities between images that are supposed to depict different experiments.Recently, PubPeer was contacted about those comments by Nicholas Roumel, an attorney at Nacht, Roumel, Salvatore, Blanchard & Walker P.C. in Ann Arbor, Michigan, who represents Sarkar and spoke to ScienceInsider on his behalf. On 9 June, the University of Mississippi Medical Center announced that Sarkar would join the faculty in its school of pharmacy. Records from a meeting of the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning note that he was offered a tenured position and a salary of $350,000 per year, effective 1 July. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email But on 19 June, Roumel says, Sarkar got a letter from the University of Mississippi revoking its offer. Science has not seen the letter, but Romel says that in his view, “it made it crystal clear the PubPeer postings were the reason they were rescinding the job offer.” A representative for the University of Mississippi declined to comment on the case, citing prospective employees’ confidentiality.According to Roumel, Wayne State allowed Sarkar to keep the position he had formally resigned but revoked his tenure. The events have “had a devastating effect on his career,” Roumel says. A representative of Wayne State confirmed that Sarkar is employed there but gave no details about any change in his status.Roumel says that because Sarkar suspects the person or persons who posted some of the PubPeer comments also circulated them to the University of Mississippi, as well as to colleagues in his department at Wayne State, he wants to find out their identities and file suit against them. One possible charge is defamation, Roumel says, because he believes several comments—some now removed by PubPeer’s moderators—stray from the facts to insinuate deliberate misconduct, in violation of PubPeer’s posting guidelines. Roumel has exchanged letters with PubPeer requesting the identity of the commenters, but no suits or request for a subpoena have been filed.PubPeer argues that researchers should defend their papers against online comments without resorting to legal action. “Authors have every opportunity to respond directly to any comments on PubPeer they feel are unjustified,” an anonymous PubPeer contact told ScienceInsider in an e-mail. Roumel’s response is that his client has no responsibility to critics who refuse to put a name to their accusations. “I don’t think he has any obligation to provide the data [behind the papers called into question] to anyone other than a journal,” he says.PubPeer’s own liability is a separate issue. If the site merely provided a forum for the comments and did not contribute to their content, as its moderators maintain, they would be immune from libel actions under a section of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, says Nicholas Jollymore, a libel lawyer at Jollymore Law Office P.C. in San Francisco, California, who represents PubPeer. But the effort to identify the commenters may involve a subpoena to PubPeer for information about it users, Roumel says.And although those who post comments have a right to anonymity under the First Amendment, “it’s by no means an absolute right,” says Alexander Abdo, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in New York City. They can lose this protection if there is a strong case of wrongdoing against them. “Whoever is trying to unmask someone needs to show that there is some likelihood of success of their claim,” Abdo says. He says the ACLU would work with Jollymore to defend PubPeer should Sarkar go forward with a lawsuit or subpoena.It’s not clear how much information a subpoena would yield. Users can create a PubPeer account using their e-mail address at an academic or research institution, but others submit “unregistered” comments through the site’s moderators. PubPeer may have names and e-mails for registered posters, but only IP addresses for the others. An Internet service provider may be able to look up who accesses the Internet from an IP address at a given time, Abdo says, but there are also ways to conceal one’s identity from such a search. Asked about possible wrongdoing by the PubPeer community, the moderators replied, “We will do everything possible to protect our users.”center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

20 Jul

Updated Brains GPS earns three neuroscientists a Nobel Prize

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img (Science has made this 2006 feature looking at the history of place and grid cells freely available)Research on how the brain knows where it is has bagged the 2014 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, the Nobel Committee has announced from Stockholm. One half of the prize goes to John O’Keefe, director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour at University College London. The other is for a husband-wife couple: May-Britt Moser, who is director of the Centre for Neural Computation in Trondheim, and Edvard Moser, director of the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in Trondheim.In the 1970s, O’Keefe discovered the first component of this positioning system, a kind of nerve cell that is active when a rat is in a certain place in a room. Trying to learn more about how individual brain cells could control behavior, he recorded signals from individual nerve cells in a rat’s brain as the animal moved around a room. He noticed that a specific cell in the brain region called the hippocampus would signal each time the rat was in a specific part of the room. Different cells corresponded to different places, and O’Keefe concluded that these “place cells” allowed the rat to construct a mental map of the environment. The hippocampus stores multiple maps, based on the activity of place cell activities. Place cells “set in motion an entire field” within neuroscience, says Loren Frank, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco. “Hundreds, if not thousands” of neuroscientists interested in how the brain perceives, remembers, and plans movement through space flocked to study the hippocampus’s role in spatial memory after O’Keefe’s original find, adds Lynn Nadel, a neuroscientist at the University of Arizona in Tucson, who collaborated with O’Keefe on a 1978 book about place cells.Three decades later, May‐Britt and Edvard Moser were trying to figure out more about how the place cells work, when they discovered another set of cells in a neighboring part of the brain, the entorhinal cortex. Those cells, called “grid cells,” play a role similar to the grid on street maps that can help locate a specific street or point of interest. In a series of three papers in Science and Nature between 2004 and 2006, they laid out how the brain uses the grid cells to help animals find their way, even in the dark. “We’re over the moon about this discovery,” O’Keefe told Science in 2006 in a feature story on the history of place and grid cells.”The discoveries of John O´Keefe, May‐Britt Moser and Edvard Moser have solved a problem that has occupied philosophers and scientists for centuries—how does the brain create a map of the space surrounding us and how can we navigate our way through a complex environment? How do we experience our environment?” the Nobel Committee says in its statement.Recently, researchers have begun to manipulate these navigational neurons. A team earlier this year altered the positive and negative associations that mice had formed with specific locations, by triggering hippocampal place cells with lasers while simultaneously stimulating other brain cells. And although grid and place cells remain a focus of fundamental neuroscience research, there are hints of clinical relevance: The hippocampus and entorhinal cortex are among the first brain regions damaged in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s,  One of the first symptoms in Alzheimer patients is that they lose their way and become disoriented easily.Although the Nobel committee’s choice was a surprise to few in the neuroscience community, it still caught the Mosers and O’Keefe off-guard. O’Keefe latter was plugging away on grant proposals at home when he got the call. When May-Britt received the call from the Nobel Committee informing her of the prize this morning, her husband was on an airplane flying to Munich, she told Nobelprize.org in an interview. Upon landing, the news finally made it to him, he said in an interview: “Finally I found out, because there were 150 emails and 75 text messages that had come in the last two hours.”For more on Nobels in science, click here.last_img read more

20 Jul

Look out Robots could soon teach each other new tricks

first_img By Matthew HutsonMay. 10, 2017 , 10:00 AM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Someday soon, robot assistants will be a part of our everyday lives—but only if we can teach them new tasks without programming. If you have to learn to code, you might as well make the sandwich yourself. Now, a new system makes teaching robots almost as easy as teaching a child. And conveniently—or alarmingly, if you’re afraid of robot dominion—they can use this system to share their skills with each other.There are two basic ways to train a robot. One is to program its movements, which requires time and coding expertise. The other is to demonstrate what you want by tugging on its limbs, moving digital representations of them, or doing the task yourself as an example for the robot to imitate. But delicate tasks sometimes require more precision than a person can demonstrate by hand—defusing a bomb is one good example. Now, with a system called C-LEARN, scientists have imbued a robot with a knowledge base of simple steps that it can intelligently apply when learning a new task.“[C-LEARN] takes a very practical approach that works really well,” says Anca Dragan, a roboticist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was not involved in the research. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In this system, human users first help build the robot’s knowledge base. Researchers taught a two-armed robot called Optimus by clicking and dragging its limbs in a software program. They demonstrated movements, such as grasping the top of a cylinder or the side of a block. They performed each task seven times from different positions. The movement varied slightly each time, and the robot looked for patterns that it then integrated into its system. For example, if the grasper always ended up roughly parallel to the object, the robot would infer that parallelism was an important constraint to that process.At this point, the robot is “like a 2-year-old baby that just knows how to reach for something and grasp it,” says Claudia Pérez D’Arpino, a computer scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge and the leader of the study. With its knowledge base, the robot can learn new, multistep tasks with just a single demonstration. Users show robots the desired task with the C-LEARN software, and then approve or correct the robot’s attempt. It’s a one-and-done affair.“Robots that can obey geometric constraints have been around for more than a decade,” says Maya Cakmak, a roboticist at the University of Washington in Seattle who was not involved in the work. “However, so far only experts have been able to make use of them.”To test the system, the researchers taught Optimus four multistep tasks: to pick up a bottle and drop it in a bucket, to grab and lift a tray horizontally with both hands, to open a box with one hand and press a button inside it with the other, and to grasp a handle on a cube with one hand and pull a rod straight out of the cube with the other. For each task, Optimus received one demonstration and made 10 attempts. It succeeded 37 out of 40 times, researchers will report later this month at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation.For an even tougher challenge, the researchers transferred Optimus’s knowledge base and its plans for the four tasks to a simulation of Atlas, a two-footed robot that has to keep its balance. Atlas managed to complete all four tasks. But when researchers deleted some of the transferred knowledge, such as the constraint of keeping certain movements parallel, it failed.Such knowledge transfer would have practical application, D’Arpino says. “You can teach one robot to do something in a factory in Germany, and there’s no reason you can’t transfer that to a different robot in Canada.” Of course, of concern to those who have a dystopian view of the future is that robots teaching each other new skills over the internet would be a necessary first step toward world domination.D’Arpino is now seeing whether people interacting with Optimus for the first time can teach it new tricks. The results so far are promising, though she’s not ready to discuss them in detail. Next, she hopes to teach robots the flexibility to adjust their learned skills on the fly.One eventual goal is to teach the robots to disable bombs, a delicate task in which robots need to be directed quickly and with high precision. Other applications include finding people in a disaster, manufacturing electronics, and helping sick—or lazy—people with chores around the house. “There’s this promise of robots at home, but the reality is that now they can do nothing,” D’Arpino says. “What can a robot today do at your place, other than vacuum? It’s really hard.” She’s hoping to change that.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Look out: Robots could soon teach each other new trickslast_img read more

20 Jul

Baby marmosets learn to talk just like we do

first_img Baby marmosets learn to ‘talk’ just like we do Iuliia Timofeeva/Shutterstock 00:0000:0000:00 By Virginia MorellMay. 25, 2017 , 12:00 PM Baby marmosets learn to make their calls by trying to repeat their parents’ vocalizations, scientists report today in Current Biology. Humans were thought to be the only primate with vocal learning—the ability to hear a sound and repeat it, considered essential for speech. When our infants babble, they make apparently random sounds, which adults respond to with words or other sounds; the more this happens, the faster the baby learns to talk.To find out whether marmosets (Callithrix jacchus, pictured) do something similar, scientists played recordings of parental calls during a daily 30-minute session to three sets of newborn marmoset twins until they were 2 months old (roughly equivalent to a 2-year-old human). Baby marmosets make noisy guttural cries; adults respond with soft “phee” contact calls (listen to their calls below). Daniel Y The baby that consistently heard its parents respond to its cries learned to make the adult “phee” sound much faster than did its twin, the team found. It’s not yet known if this ability is limited to the marmosets; if so, the difference may be due to the highly social lives of these animals, where, like us, multiple relatives help care for babies.last_img read more

20 Jul

Ultrasonic probe could detect stroke brain damage in young babies

first_img By Emily UnderwoodOct. 11, 2017 , 2:00 PM ISTOCK.COM/STOCKSTUDIOX Ultrasonic probeEEG electrodes So Baud’s team aimed for a soft spot: the anterior fontanelle, a membrane-covered gap between the bones of an infant’s skull, which hardens as the bones fuse around age 2. The researchers attached a 40-gram ultrasonic probe to the anterior fontanelles of six healthy babies. A flexible silicon mount kept the device in place, while a wire transmitted data to a computer.Despite their small size, the probes are 50 times as sensitive at measuring blood flow as conventional ultrasound. Like an EEG machine, they could easily distinguish between two phases of sleep in napping newborns: “active” sleep, in which the brain displays continuous electrical activity; and “quiet” sleep, in which brain activity waxes and wanes. When combined with EEG, the probes detected seizures in two infants whose cortexes had developed abnormally. The researchers were even able to identify where in the brain the seizures started by tracking the waves of increased blood flow that occur during such an event, they report today in Science Translational Medicine.The probe, which runs custom software on commercially available hardware, is not yet sensitive enough to monitor brain activity outside the fontanelle area. With refinement, however, Baud believes the device will be able to detect abnormal brain activity caused by conditions like early onset sepsis, an infection of the bloodstream that can cause brain damage. It could also help distinguish healthy and unhealthy brain activity in young babies, a vitally important aspect of clinical trials for drugs aimed at protecting the brain from infection.The new technique is equally important for neuroscientists who want to study normal brain development and the developmental origins of diseases such as autism, Thomason says. If researchers could acquire more data about brain development during this early stage, she says, “we could make much stronger predictions in the future.” If you’ve ever found yourself in an MRI machine, you know keeping still isn’t easy. For newborns, it’s nearly impossible. Now, a portable, ultrasonic brain probe about the size of a domino could do similar work, detecting seizures and other abnormal brain activity in real time, according to a new study. It could also monitor growing babies for brain damage that can lead to diseases like cerebral palsy.“This is a window of time we haven’t had access to, and techniques like this are really going to open that up,” says Moriah Thomason, a neuroscientist at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, who wasn’t involved in the new study.Researchers have long been able to take still pictures of the newborn brain and study brain tissue after death. But brain function during the first few weeks of life, which is “utterly essential to future human health,” has always been something of a black box, Thomason says. Two techniques used in adults—functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which can measure blood flow; and electroencephalography (EEG), which measures electrical activity in the outer layers of the brain—have their drawbacks. FMRI doesn’t work well with squirmy tots, is expensive, and is too big to haul to a delicate baby’s bedside. EEG—which only requires attaching a few wires to someone’s head—can’t penetrate deeper brain structures or show where a seizure begins, critical information for doctors weighing treatment options, says Olivier Baud, a developmental neuroscientist at the Robert Debré University Hospital in Paris. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Ultrasonic probe could detect stroke, brain damage in young babies Some newborns are at risk of seizures and abnormal brain activity. Seeking to develop something small, yet powerful, Baud and colleagues turned to ultrasound, an imaging technology that uses high-frequency sound waves to capture moving images of structures inside the body. Previous studies have shown that extremely fast ultrasound waves—10,000 frames per second, compared with the 50 frames per second in conventional medical imaging—can detect tiny changes in blood volume within blood vessels in rodent and human brains. As in fMRI, scientists use these changes in blood flow to approximate electrical activity in neurons. But because ultrasound does not easily pass through bone, these studies required that the skull be filed down or cracked open. A portable brain scan Ultrasonic probe can detect seizures in young infants. V. Altounian/Science after Demene et al. Imaging plane Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more